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First time viewing Pleiades


SacRiker
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Last night went outside with my binocs and watched Jupiter while I waited for my eyes to adjust.  After 15 minutes or so I turned my attention to Orion and follwed his belt up to Taurus...then scanned back and forth looking desperatley for  pleiades.  I say desperately because I was scared the moon would blind me (so bright!).  Finally, through some wispy coulds, I saw a beautiful tiny dipper-like cluster.  The more I looked at it, the more I was amazed. 

For those with more experience, what's the best way to view pleiades?  Binocs seemed pretty good.

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Moon is not going to do any damage, I use binoculars all the time to view the moon. Have observed it through a 6" scope (no filter), it was superb, great residual image on the eye for about 30 seconds. :grin: :grin: :grin:

Last night the moon was close to the Pleiades and they were not overly easy to locate.

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Binoculars are excellent for the Pleiades because they are actually quite large. They look best (to me) when framed by dark sky so you can take in the whole cluster.

I reckon about 2.5 degrees or more is good, a nice Widefield scope will do the trick too.

This image has TelRad circles of 0.5, 2 and 4 degrees on it so you have some idea of scale.

d363b371c307a827fde7f403fbb516a5.jpg

This shows a 4.5 degree binocular field, plus a 2.3 ish field which I get from a Widefield refractor and 32mm Plossl for example.

31d4058f6261a37e4e9ed9dc81270819.jpg

Stu

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Binoculars are excellent for the Pleiades because they are actually quite large. They look best (to me) when framed by dark sky so you can take in the whole cluster.

I reckon about 2.5 degrees or more is good, a nice Widefield scope will do the trick too.

This image has TelRad circles of 0.5, 2 and 4 degrees on it so you have some idea of scale.

d363b371c307a827fde7f403fbb516a5.jpg

This shows a 4.5 degree binocular field, plus a 2.3 ish field which I get from a Widefield refractor and 32mm Plossl for example.

31d4058f6261a37e4e9ed9dc81270819.jpg

Stu

Very helpful!  Thank you!

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Binoculars are good but a tripod (with bins or a 'scope) would give you the stability to view it in more detail (also your arms don't ache!). 

Funny you should say that -- I just today bought a tripod and adapter for my binocs.  Trying to look at Jupiter's moons with arms shaking is damn near impossible. 

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Pleiades looks great though anything. But without the moon turning the sky grey, your bins will really make them jump out and possibly give the best view out of all the viewing.

Good call re the tripod.

Paul

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The first DSO I viewed and nearly always have a quick peak when they are on show, either with the scope or bins. 

If you enjoyed the Pleiades track down the Beehive (M44) another great object for bins.

Thanks, will check this out tonight.

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I would say that out of all my instruments, my 20x80 bins provide the best view of the Pleiades.  They are framed nicely in the 20x80's, and on most dark nights, here in Arizona, they reveal the associated reflection nebulosity quite well.

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I would say that out of all my instruments, my 20x80 bins provide the best view of the Pleiades. They are framed nicely in the 20x80's, and on most dark nights, here in Arizona, they reveal the associated reflection nebulosity quite well.

Are those bins massive?

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My two options currently are 10x50 bins and a 10" Dob. Having tried both I'd rather use the bins to view Pleiades every time. Not to say they aren't pretty in the scope, but given the choice I'd much rather go with the larger field of view, where you can see the entire cluster.

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Well done! For me the best views are in binoculars. I've looked at them in a few instruments up to a 12" reflector, and whilst their nebulosity is visible in the latter, it's always the 20x80s that leave me and others saying "wow". The wide field of binoculars contextualises the cluster so beautifully.

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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Are those bins massive?

Pretty much so, and at the absolute limit for very short hand held use. I have an entrance porch South facing and can jam my elbows into the walls either side, but otherwise a sturdy tripod is essential.

I agree Pleiades are beautiful.

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