Jump to content

sgl_imaging_challenge_6_banner_jupiter_2021.jpg.eacb9f0c2f90fdaafda890646b3fc199.jpg

 

 

Best off the peg shed to convert?


skippyinspace
 Share

Recommended Posts

OK have now had quotes and have bought the plans for the skyshed and things are getting a bit expensive, So its time to go back to basics.

IF I was to buy a B&Q, Homebase, etc shed, looking at 8 x 8 size, What would you reccomend, Metal, timber, Personal experience of converting.

And most of all a ball park figure to convert one of these standard sheds.

Thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I bought a metal 6 x 7 shed from Argos, £120, was a bit of a job to put up by myself but got there. The best part is the roof is in two parts, the centre spar splits so this enables me to roll both sections out sideways rather than the orignal way of the whole roof off longways. By doing it sideways I did not have the problem of needing more space. The shed was also big enough for all my gear, all the photo links on my sig.

Jim

Edited by The Sailor
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Regarding wooden sheds from DIY stores:

These sheds are quite flimsy IMO. Remember that the rigidity comes from the shed being complete. That is, if you remove the roof then the rest of it becomes floppy.

You would need to beef up the wall bearers to combat this.

It might be more prudent to get a shed from someone who makes them, then you can specify the type of construction. Yes, it will be more expensive but it would do the job.

Steve

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Imn impressed Sailor, very impressed and I like the wooden panelling as well, a great place to live when the wife chucks you out lol. Seriously well done I hope its well secure

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank Super, yes the panelling has helped me route cables round to where I need them without them being in the way. The security is a problem but all I can do is cover it with cameras and a security light on the door, if someone is determined no amout of security will stop them but they will have to make a bit of a racket to get in :(

Jim

Oh SWMBO would never do that, well I don't think so :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know mate , my garage was attacked a few months ago but I did not make it easy and in the end they were caught red handed by place plain clothes police albeit after they did all the damage. Im contemplating having a small obsey but still bare the scars from a few months ago.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes the damage is the worst part, all your hard earned cash down the drain. Although surrounded by a large fence and wall I have tried to ensure that anyone getting into the garden has a hard time, axel grease on top of the fence and wall, the thorniest of rose bushes and what ever else I have learnt from my jungle days is there to give them a nice welcome :) The area by the observatory and fence has a bit of rubble, enough to give anyone comming over the fence a cracked ankle :(

Jim

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My 10'x8' shed was about £700 from a local company. Much better build quality rigidity than your average B&Q etc. Despite this, I still ended spending a few hundred quid strengthening further and making the roof slide off.

Biggest thing with any shed is that it relies on 4 sides & floor & roof to make a strong box. By making a moveable roof, you lose a lot of the strength.

Hope this helps.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Agree David, what I done to diminish any loss of strength was add 4 6x1 planks to the top, this also helped to establish the base for rolling the roof. I have to say that with the shed I bought it was quite rigid without the roof anyway, the corner panels were built in a way to alleviate this and were quite strong.

Jim

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Have a look at my Blog in my signature - you will have to go back quite a bit!! There you can see how I "upgraded" a metal shed with a new inner frame to get over the rigidity problem. Mine is only 6'x6' so I would suspect you will need around 8'x8'. The big advantage of the metal shed is the roof conversion is relativly easy - all the bolt holes are already there!!

When I was researching the project it was quite obvious that most commercial garden sheds are really not very strong at all. It is quite unlikely they would stay upright with the roof off and no additional framing,

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To be honest, a decent shed will cost £300 - £500 for something like a 5 x 7 pent roof, and then it will loose a lot of its stability when the roof is made to roll off. Years ago I was involved in the building of our societies observatory, and for around the same amount of cash we managed to build it from stock timber and tongue and grove. Have a look at these images for some inspiration.

obs8.jpg

obs1.jpg

obs5.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, the observatory was opened in August 1993, and apart from regular maintenance and modifications to the mount to take a Mead LX200 14", its been running fine. The roof is counter-balanced by a cable and counter-weight system, which contain buckets of lead shot used for grinding pigments. The drop of is south facing.

The design has held up for almost 18 years so yes I guess I would go down the same route again.. like a said, cost wise buying loads of 4" x 3" from a local builder worked our reasonable even back then. If I recall our budget was £1500 on the observatory, and £1500 for a scope and other bits and bobs, but we actually came in at around £1000 for the observatory and that included the concrete for the foundations part of which was a 1m cube for the mount... all laid single handed (and I mean that as I had just had my left arm out of plaster !) by yours truly !

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The other option is to cut the side walls at a height and make the "roof" bigger.

With the Argos TSO, I found that I was limited by surrounding houses, street lights, trees etc anyway, so there was no need to push further down to the horizon.

If you go for lower wall just make sure the "roof" will clear the scope!!

Also make sure you finish the build before the storm comes!

post-15261-133877544419_thumb.jpg

post-15261-133877544424_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

I slightly less bothersome option, which I adopted due to lack of space but do not regret in the least, is to have a roll off shed obsy.

If you have the "right" situation regarding the position of your obsy the roll off shed can be much smaller, mine is 6x4 link here - http://stargazerslounge.com/diy-observatories/106187-my-roll-off-obsy.html

Avantages, small shed, lower cost, no roof worries, no strength worries, plenty of space for the scope.

Disadvantages, more exposed to wind - I am lucky as I have a nice sheltered spot anyway, no warm room, again I had a seperate shed already for that duty!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.