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Sky Safari - Telescope Observe configuration


Alex_o0
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Hi All,

Recently I have been using SkySafari Plus on ios.  I have been experimenting with different telescope displays by adding equipment under observe.

When I set the scope display to use the scope and a lens for example , the scope view shows Saturn as a bright star and you cannot make out any detail unless you zoom in.

How accurate is sky safaris telescope  emulation is this what I can expect with the scope in question ?

Or am I misunderstanding the concept/feature Sky Safari is offering.

 

1) Scope being set 

IMG-2829.thumb.JPG.7510ad48e4471c2d360cb449368b41f6.JPG 

 

2) Observing with the scope in question (Cannot make out any detail) also tired with A Barlow

  IMG-2827.thumb.JPG.4f83d25221ec4f54d2c4273f610671f1.JPG

 

3)After I zoom in 

IMG-2828.thumb.JPG.92c97ca886bb10993471c150c16a72f4.JPG

Edited by Alex_o0
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If you're using Sky Safari to try to choose between the different size dobs in your equipment list I don't think that is going to work. I think the equipment lists are used simply to draw the field of view circles, not to emulate what a telescope will show. The brightness of objects and the maximum magnitude of stars shown are just determined by your Sky Safari settings. After all, you can set rings from multiple scopes at the same time. In your first picture, Sky Safari is only showing the brightness of Saturn to help you find it in the sky, it isn't emulating what Saturn will look like. With any of those scopes an 11mm eyepiece will distinctly show Saturn as a planet and rings but it will be very small and you will want to view with a shorter focal length eyepiece if the conditions allow it (and if the conditions don't allow it maybe that isn't the night to view Saturn).

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I would agree. SkySafari is great at a whole range of things but visualising how planets look at lower powers in the eyepiece is not one of its strengths. Same as the moon, below a certain size they are just represented as a circle, whereas in the scope you would likely still see some detail.

The feature is excellent for showing the size of a range of DSOs and also for giving you a perspective on where the planetary moons are in relation to the field of view.

The scopes you have setup are all the same focal length, so SkySafari will show them as exactly the same, no difference in detail at all. 

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