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newbie

hi everyone firstly been having a look round the site and seems brilliant i very new to astrononomy and my experience is no bigger than over the last few years watching documentaries and the odd episode of the sky at night and old clips on youtube i have recently been interested in buying a telescope but after reading your comments it seems best to have a good understanding before rushing out and buying one, i was looking at ones with gotos and that sort of stuff but have decided to do things the old fashioned way was just wondering if anyone had some suggestions for the best books for novices to get me started, im 26 years old so maybe a kids one like 'my first space book' may not be suitable any help would be much appreciated thanks dan:)

rigione68

rigione68

 

Observing report 2 Part 1 - Saturn 22-4-11

So my Skyliner 200p had finally arrived, and after assembling and modding bits to it during shoddy weather, it got is first light last night. What a night it was! I checked the collimation before packing all my kit up into my car. I wasn’t going to waste a night of good seeing with my new scope, stuck in a garden filled with light pollution. I drove 15 mins to my local site, with my dad clutching onto a wooden stool and a rug. We have been trying to find a seat higher as with objects at the zenith, the dobsonian focuser was just too high for camping chairs. After setting up and taking what felt like 3 seconds to get everything ready, we set up the binos to allow the scope to cool down. We are both very pleased with the ease of use with this dob, it is exactly what I should have started with to begin my journey into serious amateur astronomy. There were 3 main environmental bonuses last night, they were that the dew didn’t come down at all, the moon hardly rose above the horizon and that the temperature was perfectly mild. This made a great difference to last time we were out and our coffee was freezing to the top of the cars! I spent 1 minute aligning the optical scope and telrad to my highest power eyepiece, centred on polaris for least movement. This REALLY helped for the rest of the night and enabled us to bath through a giant list of objects that would have definitely proved more difficult to locate. I recommend this to any new starters like me. While I was looking at polaris I also checked the collimation by defocusing and I was more than happy with the results. Firstly we zoomed to Saturn, there was still a little light in the sky so I knew it would be 3 or 4 hours before it reached its optimal height in the sky for viewing. Nevertheless my mind was blown away! For the first time in my entire life I could see the cassini divison J This beautiful gap in the rings was visible on both sides of the planet and I was so chuffed to have seen it! The 8mm televue plossl had really proved it’s worth. Obviously the contrast and sharpness was second to none, but what I am consistently impressed by is the way in which Televues make it really easy to focus into a crispness, something essential for planetary observing – buy this eyepiece! While spending around 30 mins so that my dad could also say he has seen cassini, we tried to catalogue the moons that were currently visible. We thought that we could make out 7, but I had remembered from previous sessions with my old scope that looking on stellarium afterwards had proven some of them were stars. I can now clarify that we saw Rhea and Dione very close to each other, Tethys and Titan the other side and bright. But for the first time a new moon as well, Mimas! Mimas was all but a tiny pin ***** of light, but it was definitely apparent, very close to the plane of the gorgeous rings. Through my new scope and eyepieces such lovely detail we observed. As well as Mimas and cassini being firsts, the increased detail showed horizontal shadow of the rings on the planet as a lovely thin black line. The rings were very obviously moving in front of the planet on one half of the semi circle, and moving behind the planet on the other. The rings were slightly brighter than the planets sphere so it was possible to make out them passing in front of the edges on the planet. Likewise, the planet cast a very small shadow one of the far side of rings, indicating they were behind. I mention this in depth because before my new purchases, it was impossible for me to detect which side of the rings were passing in front and behind of the planet. The current dark band on the planet was really confusing before now, it and the storm slightly above were causing a confusing optical illusion whereby both sides of the rings appeared to be passing in front of the planet. But now it was like witnessing a 3D hologram in space! Although my session featured Saturn and lots of deep sky objects, I have chosen to split it into two parts and I realised I have already droned on for far enough...!

Adz

Adz

 

WARM FUZZIES

April 25th, 2011 It was -16°C (3.2 ºF) outside so I knew that I didn't have to worry about frostbite. I was also well aware that the weather station was predicting rain for the rest of the week and I was leaving on vacation on Friday. Yeah,.. It was to be my last time outside with my telescope for a good three weeks. I didn't even think twice about it. Even if I had classes to teach the very next morning, even if I knew that it would take some time for darkness to fall,.. I brought my telescope out for some star gazing. I decided to set my sights on the constellation Leo since it seems that all one has to do in this sector of space is sneeze and one stumbles on a galaxy. I stumbled on two right away: M 95 and 96 (both spiral galaxies found over 30 million light years from where I was standing). I looked away from my eyepiece when I spotted them since a strong emotion overtook me. It's not that I hadn't seen galaxies before, it's also not because they were overly interesting,.. it was because I could see them. When I am struck with an MS relapse, my eyesight becomes blurry and remains as such for many weeks. Recovery is slow. Many times I wonder, "Is it becoming better?" or "Am I just getting used to it?",... To strain through blurriness to see what stands in front of me is one thing. To see perfectly and become excited in discovering something blurry through an eyepiece is quite another. I saw two. Nah,... they weren't blurry,... let's just call them for what they are: WARM FUZZIES. Since I was clearly able to see them, I can now officially declare that my vision has returned (no matter what my doctor says when I see him this summer). One doesn't need eyesight to have vision right? Before calling it a night I took a small detour to see my dazzling neighbour that had remained silent up till then. Saturn showed its rings proudly when I finally settled on its face. I guess we both were sharing the same tune that night: YOU CRAZY DIAMOND!

stolenfeather

stolenfeather

 

WARM FUZZIES

April 25th, 2011 It was -16°C (3.2 ºF) outside so I knew that I didn't have to worry about frostbite. I was also well aware that the weather station was predicting rain for the rest of the week and I was leaving on vacation on Friday. Yeah,.. It was to be my last time outside with my telescope for a good three weeks. I didn't even think twice about it. Even if I had classes to teach the very next morning, even if I knew that it would take some time for darkness to fall,.. I brought my telescope out for some star gazing. I decided to set my sights on the constellation Leo since it seems that all one has to do in this sector of space is sneeze and one stumbles on a galaxy. I stumbled on two right away: M 95 and 96 (both spiral galaxies found over 30 million light years from where I was standing). I looked away from my eyepiece when I spotted them since a strong emotion overtook me. It's not that I hadn't seen galaxies before, it's also not because they were overly interesting,.. it was because I could see them. When I am struck with an MS relapse, my eyesight becomes blurry and remains as such for many weeks. Recovery is slow. Many times I wonder, "Is it becoming better?" or "Am I just getting used to it?",... To strain through blurriness to see what stands in front of me is one thing. To see perfectly and become excited in discovering something blurry through an eyepiece is quite another. I saw two. Nah,... they weren't blurry,... let's just call them for what they are: WARM FUZZIES. Since I was clearly able to see them, I can now officially declare that my vision has returned (no matter what my doctor says when I see him this summer). One doesn't need eyesight to have vision right? Before calling it a night I took a small detour to see my dazzling neighbour that had remained silent up till then. Saturn showed its rings proudly when I finally settled on its face. I guess we both were sharing the same tune that night: YOU CRAZY DIAMOND!

stolenfeather

stolenfeather

 

What will the neighbours think?

Seeing has my wife likes to go to bed early! 9pm watch telly etc, i took the binoe`s up so i could see ISS coming over last night at 9.28, i was sat in bathroom with window wide open waiting with the sky masters binoe`s. must have looked a right perv hanging out there, ISS was good, low in sky very bright, wish i had scope out it was travelling quite slow, i reckon i could have tracked it with the heritage dob, for a bit more detail.

mr saddo

mr saddo

 

My CCD Journey : 4

Well it has been a while. Partly this is due to other new equipment that I have been 'getting to grips with'. Partly it is due to the frustration I was beginning to feel with the ccd and the seeming impossibility of me ever getting anything half-way decent. Anyway, I decided that last night would be an opportunity to have another go. Used the 6SE, as I wanted to image NGC 3242 (the ghost of Jupiter) before it completely disappears into the twilight for another year. Nice and bright, so thought it would not be a problem. First problem was the tracking. Because of the smaller fov, I found that, despite it being a better alt-az mount than the slt, fewer of the frames I took (which were only 15-second subs) were useable [due to trailing]; only 56/144. Well, 56 is better than none. However, when I put them in DSS, it told me that there were not enough stars to align and only one sub would be stacked. This is spite of the presence of at least a dozen quite bright stars. I tried numerous combinations, but could not get DSS to stack any more than one sub. Anyway, the result is attached. Horribly noisy, but this is hardly surpising in the circumstances. And even though it is only 15s data, the outer shell, inner structure and central star are all visible. So I suppose it could have been worse. And, in fairness, the problems I have had with it are due to the mount and DSS rather than getting to grips with the camera. So not too despondent.

Demonperformer

Demonperformer

 

Saturn 25 26 april

:clouds1:hi all got a few snaps of saturn ,the wind wad +12mph the 12 dob with dew shield,was here there and every were video was not on at all.so got the d10 and colred filters ,that wa even worse,so back to the web cami found away with 3 large crocodile clips with a bit of old push bike in a tube to clamp the base that worked out ok`ish any way to tired to upload all pics a will try one if a have no joy then will do later did any view tonight between 22:45/00"45 has all moons were on sjow and the amount of satalites that zoomed on by i counted 13 in this time also they was fly in past from all directions any one else notice these ?

todd8137

todd8137

 

iss? no! its a chinese lantern!!

went out for a look at ISS last night coming over at 9.04 for 5 mins so the NASA website said, had my 17x80 bins out what i thought was ISS, blumming Chinese lantern!! DOH, anyway did manage to get the correct object now heading east, very bright and in low orbit. Had a quick peek at Saturn with my scope out, now heading in to south, not much out at 9.30pm. Was hoping for the Lyrids but looks like i have missed them yet again, been cloudy here in York most nights, and foggy haze in early hours.

mr saddo

mr saddo

 

Viewing - Sun 24th Apr 11

Did not get out last night, too tired after a day with the outlaws, also old bones are giving out :( . Today I decided, a lovely day, done a bit of solar, just a couple of shots and a bit of play with them, here is what I am keeping: Will now keep myself in readiness for this evening, hoping for a clear night :). The evening went well, of course the ISS was part of it, nice and bright, tried to photograph it but a complete failure, too fast on the shutter. I have now put a warning label at the on/off switch on the mount warning me to put the weights on first, less accidents :). The viewing was good, returning to my own way of aligning I was pleased to be able to hit tragets and stay on them for quite a length of time, will start using the webcams next and see how they go on the new scope. Jim

The Sailor

The Sailor

 

Observing Report 1. - 06.04.11

Hey all, So while waiting for my Skyliner 200p to arrive after it’s many, many delays, I could see a good patch of clear skies coming my way – typical I thought. After feeling that I had outgrown them, I decided to try out my Revelation binoculars for another go and wow, just wow! I had completely forgotten how great these 15x70’s are. When I started zooming around the heavens, the giant field of view and really easy to use camcorder tripod made finding and looking at targets an absolute dream. One other pleasure was to view these objects the right way round and exactly how the naked eye (and stellarium + books!) shows them. I could only observe from home, which is somewhat light polluted but I cannot quite believe how much I accomplished! This is the first time I have observed with the aim to actually ‘cross off’ some messier targets and oh my did I get somewhere! I started with some targets I already knew and had observed before. M1 crab nebula in Taurus – very dim in my light polluted garden but still recognisable, obvious oval shape. M31 Andromeda galaxy – On its way out for another season but I just caught its giant expanse in the sky. M42 Orion nebula and running man – Targets just before they also cleared off below the horizon, lovely shapes in the peripheral view. NGC 1432 The Pleiades (seven sisters) – Jaw dropping in binoculars, the sharp pins of blue light were a gorgeous sight in binoculars, especially since it was optically the same way round as the naked eye. After viewing this, I realised with the binoculars I should concentrated on finding and getting to know the messier objects that were globular and open clusters. I can leave the fuzzy deep sky objects for when my dobsonian arrives. M36, M37 + M38 Clusters in Auriga – Situated perfectly from my garden I viewed these and tried to make comparisons in between them. M37 (the furthest left in the constellation) was the easiest for me to find and then simply panning right from it enabled me to discover M36 and M38. M35 in Gemini – Easily found from the leg of one of the twins, quite bold when I stumbled across it. I tried to find the cone nebula after it but failed and thought I would be better off trying with the dob. M67 in cancer – My first time learning and discovering cancer, it’s not a bright constellation, at least not from my situation. There seemed to be a bright collection within the cluster, towards the top left. M44 Praesepe beehive in Cancer – Holey moley! This was my first time viewing what I had heard many others mention before this. It was a jaw dropping sight for the eyes, just as good as the seven sisters, I cannot believe I hadn’t noticed it before! M13 in Hercules – I turned my attention to trying to view some globular clusters for the first time. Crikey when I found it I couldn’t believe how bright it was! The shape was also really impressive to the eye, I can fully recommend this to new observers! M3 cluster above Arcturus – A very easy to find globular being straight up from the very bright star, Arcturus. Not as bright as M13 for me, I later checked on stellarium and it is nice to have that confirmed by the software. I was starting to get cold so I thought I would try a few harder subjects that I had heard a lot about and then call it a night. I spent some time learning Leo as it was another constellation I didn’t have a clue about. I had seen many images on the forum featuring the Leo ‘triplet’ of galaxies so decided to give them a go to find. With the light pollution around me it was possible that I could just see M66 (the brightest). But the other two (M65 + NGC 3628) within the field of view of my binoculars evaded me completely. Finally, I had also heard a lot about the Bodes pair of nebula (M81 + M82). Located roughly between Ursa major and minor, finding them wasn’t easy. M81 is more face on and much brighter, I could easily make it out. However M82 was much more difficult and will be subject to a lot more study by me when the moon decides to clear off. So to round off my knowledge has expanded tremendously since I first started observing and it all just reinforces my decision to buy a dobsonian next with complete enthusiasm! Some of my next planned objects to discover are: > Juno > M56 ring nebula > Owl cluster > Cats eye nebula

Adz

Adz

 

My first proper 'Star Party' - 29.03.11

Hey all, I thought I should finally get around to writing about the adventures of my observing parties so far. I have been observing for a long time since I was young right up to now where my dad and me still regularly go out together. But recently when he cannot come, I take the opportunity to invite my friends along instead, and what an adventure it is now turning into! __________ My first session was at my local site with a good friend of mine and his girlfriend. He has a Meade SCG of about 6" and at the time I had an f/5 8" reflector. Before this we had spent many an evening trying to figure out each others equipment and getting to know how to achieve great viewing. Whenever possible we would stay up for meteor showers and other events. But this stargazing about a month ago took on a new feel when his girlfriend decided to come along this time. It was really refreshing to see her genuinely impressed with the knowledge and the views of objects my friend and me where able to provide. I found myself enjoying pointing things out and explaining what they meant. The information was coming from this forum, my current astronomy course, books and also Brian Cox. It is such a rewarding feeling and one that is addictive too! _________ Spurred on by this newly found enjoyment, I set about organising something proper. My first 'Star Party'. Helpfully, word had travelled around where my friend and me are employed and to my surprise, many, many people were interested in a star gazing session! So I set about looking up the weather and thank the lord there was a definite confirmed night of clearness. (clever me had forgotten to check up on the moons current stage and it was 1 day off a full moon!) I called and emailed everyone about the date and told them to meet at a friends boat mooring, the perfect place. It had unobstructed views, plenty of ground space and was not near any direct light pollution. I loaded up my scope and everything else into my little corsa (it is amazing what you can get into one if you put your mind to it) and drove a fair way to the boat place. Collimated nice and early and I had also prepared a flask of tea and one of coffee with two massive packs of biscuits (no jaffa cakes, please don't kill me!) which believe me didn't last long. It was all set up on the table with some books and many chairs. My powerpack thrusting a large amount of red light out over the meadow to help people. When people had finished arriving I finally realised how were actually here, about 15!!! So I had my work cut out and couldn't wait to see some of their reactions. I must stress that every single one of my friends had a real interest in astronomy and viewing the cosmos. There were male and female, old and young and lots of teens like I still consider myself :) So there was a great feeling of universal interest in staring at things that make you realise you are very small :evil6: With the moon being at a stage it was, everyone wanted to see it first through the scope. But I had to reiterate that it should be the last object for our party as it will really kill the night vision! As it was washing everything out and the temp was quite cold with the frost, I decided to just stick to some bigger, more impressionable targets that I could competently lend my knowledge on. So I adjusted my scope with different eyepieces appropriate to the object and its brightness, and made my best efforts to make sure every person had a good view of each object. I decided upon (not in this order) Saturn, m1 crab nebula, M42 and the running man,beetlejuice, sirius, m31 andromeda, double cluster in persius, misar and alcor and also the moon. I also had my binos set up on a tripod, allowing anyone to scan around the sky with them while I explained the shape of a certain constellation. Some of the reactions were nothing short of priceless. I couldn't have made them up if I tried. One of my female friends absolutely refused to believe she was actually looking at Saturn. (the focus was spot on and the rings are at a lovely impressionable angle) She exclaimed "Ad seriously this isn't funny. You are misleading people here. Where have you stuck the photo inside this tube!?" It is those kind of things that stick with you and make these parties worth while :evil6: Also viewing the moon everyone seemed to find particularly amusing. Even with the cover on the front of my scope with only a small opening allowing light in, and the moon filter on my eyepieces. People were still dashing back to their cars to grab the sunglasses! Some of the people that came didn't dress up enough like I had asked so I decided to call it a night when the cups started freezing to my car roof. After this we all went back to mine as I had a free place and drunk the night away. But remember the important point to my rendition, all these people were interested and my star party was a success, yay! Star gazing live eat your heart out! I welcome any feedback you guys have, perhaps for improving things next time. I hope it has been a good, if biblically long read. Cheers, Adam ps. It's a good thing Johnathan Ross didn't show up to mine, he would have ended up in the river! :evil6: pps. I will try to get some pictures taken of us all next time if you guys would like to see.

Adz

Adz

 

My best night ever - 11.01.11

Well what I story I have. I decided to visit my local (quite well known) observatory for the Stargazing live event they were holding with the local club. I showed up with my kit but a presentation had begun early so I decided to leave my stuff in the car. The presentation was great, with very down to Earth explanations to many objects within this beautifully clear night sky. Quite a few members of the public turned up and then left in due course as their ill prepared clothes didn't keep the toe warm! The first thing to surprise me was that the local astronomy club packed up and left at 8 o'clock, straight after their presentation! It was the best seeing conditions that I have seen in my area for weeks... this amused me and my dad greatly seeing as we had been waiting for what feels like ages when you have new kit :) Secondly, we queued up for the two giant telescopes in their observatories. They were both giant refractors that I am presuming were quite old. We looked at the Pleides and Jupiter through them and boy was a not expecting this...it wasn't that great! It made me and my 8" reflector so chuffed that I can actually get better results myself :eek: So we went home and decided that if the conditions were going to be this good, we needed to make the most of it. Went to bed early and woke up at 5 for a drive to our local sky viewing area. It was fantastic and there was a slight hint of sunlight coming so we knew we had to get on it! I should mention at this point that it was seriously cold, and this is coming from a guy who has jumped in a frozen lake! I need to get some fingerless mittens... Wondering back to the story, we saw Venus, Saturn and Mercury all in this morning session. I hadn't seen Saturn in my new scope before and the results were STUNNING :hello2: I also had never even seen Mercury or Venus through a telescope before so this was a blast! I could make out a disc of Mercury and the semi circle of Venus. I just had to get this off my chest because aside from my dad, when you tell other people how amazing these experiences a blank face is often the remark :icon_eek: I was so cold I had to get back into the car and warm up, while my dad was trying to persuade me to have a go at taking some photos for reference. I knew they wouldn't be great, but I had a good effort and I am glad I did in the end. We all have to start somewhere right? If you want to see what I managed to take it's here: 2011 pictures by add453 - Photobucket So to conclude I have recently seen Uranus, Saturn, Jupiter, Mercury and Venus. I am also starting an Open University course in Astronomy so wish me luck! Adam

Adz

Adz

 

Viewing - Fri 22th Apr 11

The evening started with a rerun of the previous night, an alignment from the idiots guide. I decided on this course of action to see what was going wrong, needless to say it was again a disaster and by 2330 hrs I decided to return to the old way of point, polar align and 3 star align, straight away I seen results in the handling. I put Saturn in the frame and left it for 30 min and it was still there when I came back. During the day I had a play with a remote timer and had set it up for the evening, plugged it in and away it went, me for a coffee :). All went well for the evening and another obstacle sorted :). Just remembered, earlier in the evening noticed on Stellarium that the ISS was about to rise so got the camera ready with a telephoto lens, watched the ISS move across the sky, a bright light against the now darkening background, up swept the camera, focused and clicked, nothing happened!! Did this a couple of times more but again a dud, have to work on this lol. The ISS came over again later but was in darkness so could only watch it's progress on Stellarium :(. Jim

The Sailor

The Sailor

 

Red letter day! Best session so far... (Beginner)

Just returned inside from a 3 hour window in clouds after a welcome flash monsoon and thunderstorm cleared all the rubbish out of the sky that has been hanging around for a couple of weeks. What a difference from past nights. This is the fourth time I have used my own telescope and everything seemed to go well. As a complete, first scope, novice I have suffered from dust clouds, bad atmosphere, security lights, bad collimation, poorly aligned finder, limited EPs and limited viewable sky from my back yard in the last 3 sessions since getting my xt8i. I had a look outside before bed (about 11:50pm) and saw my opportunity. After aligning the scope 3 times, it was too far out the first two times in the haste and excitement, and firing up Stellarium on the lap top I was off searching for DSOs. Immediately I was finding them in the middle of my eyepiece clerer than ive seen before. I'm really chuffed that it is possible to get excellent viewing from my back yard given decent conditions and my investment was not a waste. I'm sure I saw more noteable objects but here is a list of things I viewed with help from the 'push to' intelliscope. I was out from the moment the cloud parted to the moment it rolled back in so really got good value. I got really good resolution on some of the globular clusters using my Orion Sirius EPs. (40mm, 27mm, 17mm) Anyway objects viewed with help of Sky at Night Mag and Stellarium: M81 - Bodes galaxy
M82 - Cigar galaxy
M63 - Spiral galaxy
NGC 4449 - Magellanic Dwarf galaxy
NGC 5005 - Spiral galaxy
M85 - Lenticular galaxy
M51 - Whirlpool galaxy (Clear double blob)
M102 - galaxy
M106 - Spiral galaxy
M3 - Globular cluster
M92 - Globular cluster (great res!)
M64 - Black eye galaxy
M52 - Open cluster
M53 - Globular cluster
M29 - Open cluster
M39 - Open cluster
NGC 6910 - Open cluster.
I was gutted that the virgo galaxy cluster that I'd been after on 2 previous occasions was behind next doors roof but the rest of my finds made up for it! Next time maybe.. Andrew :)

mylatestwhim

mylatestwhim

 

saturn 1st

well here's my first go at imaging saturn,it's not hubble standard but highly satisfying that i've taken an image of a live planet id only ever seen tv or seen in a book.any advice on improvement's greatly appreciated

coxy63

coxy63

 

Viewing - Thu 21th Apr 11

Last night was a complete disaster, for some reason I decided to follow the instructions in the idiots guide regarding polar alignment, from that moment on it all went to pot. Not one target was achieved within the finder let alone the eyepiece, and to make matters worse light pollution was horrendous. Although I took some photos I am not holding out too much on them being any good :(. I accept that this is all part of package, good nights and bad nights but will plow on and hope to achieve some good results :) Jim

The Sailor

The Sailor

 

sky watcher LPF filter 1st test

hi all well did a few shots last night but things where not ideal partly cloudy and dodge in the rest to get a few shots the skywatcher LPF filter was purchased of flo next day delivery as prompt as ever ,shot polaris because it’s a easy thing and that direction as the most sky glow sheffield is about 12 mile down the valley from me and its like a big open bowl spew in orange evil every were I will have another try tonight as these pics were taken on the 21st april ,so we will see as tonight is clear and the out look is clear we have that smog drifting in on saturday so best make the most of it heres the link for the pics http://s473.photobucket.com/albums/rr93/todd8137/skywatcher%20LPF%20filter%20RESULTS%2012%20DOB/ this is just one of many tests but so far its made a dif here my light pol is not that bad may be 25% and most of that is towards my north any pics taken face in north get the orange glow to then paint shopable but would rather it not be there

todd8137

todd8137

 

Viewing - Wed 20th Apr 11

A lovely day today and was looking forward to tonight but just remembered that we have a group talk at the local library, so have closed the obsy for the moment and will get back to it later :) Well got home from the local group meet and got straight down to stargazing. Had worked out the problem with the camera attached to the refracter earlier so went straight into checking if all was well. Aligned and then set the camera up, got focused and with a list of messiers I set off, a 60 sec shot of each one with just a LPF on, turned out better than expected, each photo was on target. Next step will be to use a Barlow, greater focus and longer exposure. All in all a good night, tired but happy :) All photographs on Facebook, just click on the link in my signature block :). Jim

The Sailor

The Sailor

 

polaris and the camera and light polution

hi all ,well last night thought a would take a few long expo`s of polaris to try and get a good star trail pic ,but to my supprise they turned out better than a thoght .for one they did not trail ok the time was about 2 mins not much of a chance there then,but i did get some good shots a will put the pics up in a minute on photo bucket the link will be there shortly ,apart from them all be in orange! any way i ordered a lpf filter,and it came this morning so a will try that a read alot about these type of filters and every one as diffrent skies so it was hard to judge so i went for the 2" sized one can not comment on how well it works as it only came this morning.any way back to the pics,i took about 30 /40 altogether of polaris some good some bad tried dif settings to see what results a would getand the best was 1.35 mins and that gave the best out come to the picstonight a will do some more of the same and test the lpf out and get the pics to see the difference cheers pat enjoy they not so bad pics all were taken at Cannon d10 ,12"skyliner iso 200 bulb setting 1.35 sec , x10 subs awb on 4 mins between each shot just to cool down no filter heres the link http://s473.photobucket.com/albums/rr93/todd8137/20tth%20april%20polaris/ also a stuck the pic of the skywatcher lpf will try that in a bit,the other pic is a result of a drop so beware

todd8137

todd8137

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