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How long to take a widefield shot 10 secs 5 secs ?

hi all the most common private msg i get on sgl is,"how many seconds should i take ?" well basic wide field shots just on a tripod with no motors, piggy back or just stuck on a camera tripod its easy lets say you have a 28mm lens on the camera and lets say you want to do a basic wide field shot of ursa major. so you shoot for 45secs and stars trail doh! try this, the magic number is 600 :) so i no my camera as a 28mm lense attached but not sure how long to keep the shutter open before trails apear divide 600 by the lense of 28mm 600 divided by 28 = 21.4 seconds so lets round that of to say 21 secs and there you go no i hear you say i can not set to 21 secs most dslrs will shoot at 20 secs so use that always go lower, never higher a was in my local one night and a old drunk bloke told me that a took it with a pinch a salt tried it the next night worked a treat every time we see the old boy in the pub i always buy him a pint so divide 600 with the lens size now if you have say a 70mm lens, 600 divided by 70 = 8.5,you will get a time before trails of 8.5 secs so the bigger the lens the less time to keep the shutter open,the smaller the lens the longer you can keep the shutter open more time cheers pat clear skies always

todd8137

todd8137

 

quick question on saturn

around 3 weeks ago i was viewing saturn and i noticed a star just above to the right. i at first thought it was titan ( which i didnt think could be visible with the naked eye ) and after i pointed my scope at it i realised it wasnt, or so i believe. its now been a few weeks and saturn still has the same star at the same position and it is still visible to the naked eye, if it was titan it should have shifted round saturn but its still in the same place. what is this star like object that is following saturn? saturn is gradually drifting across the night sky and iv been expecting this star ( or whatever it is ) to be left behind but its still there. im curious as to what it is, can anyone explain? dave.

dodgeydodge

dodgeydodge

 

Full moon ,yellow last night

Last night around 11.43 after ISS passed, the moon was rising in the south, and was full and very big, and yellow, it did not take long for it to climb high in the sky. Looked very impressive.

mr saddo

mr saddo

 

Deneb Fail

june 17th fail DENEB/ Cygnus hi all failed last night from the word go!, forgot the filters for the camera (10d) i wrote down what a was gonna do,subs times iso`s darks ect,but this all went to the dogs a sat on the sheet .the moon came up and the night skies got lighter ,a brill gold color the moon ,any way got to it and started ,2 hours later (01:20) i came in i noticed the camera lens had lots of dew then no filter checked the darks and noticed they were all 45secs and not 1 min corr what a pain stacked them this morning no joy at all iso400,subs 1 min/45 secs heres a link to the pics and heres one for now i did not get the american neb or the pelican neb in my shots a good two hours in the cold a real lesson learnt ! v link v v 17th June fail Deneb pictures by todd8137 - Photobucket

todd8137

todd8137

 

images off the ISS

hi everyone. has anybody managed to get a good picture of the ISS yet with a scope. iv seen images on the net but id love to see a close up by an astronomer! dave

dodgeydodge

dodgeydodge

 

NO lunar eclipse! in YORK

very disappointed on the lunar eclipse, it was coming out of totality in south east only 6 degrees on horizon, no chance of seeing it with building and trees in way. Watched it live on line in Cyprus and Dubi via sloosh live telescope, managed to get some screen capture pictures of it of it. come on people lets see some pics of this historic event, a video would also be nice.

mr saddo

mr saddo

 

ISS - I See Something (June 14, 2011)

My ultimate goal in surveying the night sky is experiencing the wonderment of the natural world and how incredibly vast it is. The program Stellarium helps me find remote Messier objects such as nebulae, galaxies, clusters and also comes with a plug-in that enables the viewer to identify man-made satellites. Up till now, because of lack of interest, I haven't used it that much. However, after going to Florida, seeing the Space Shuttle Endeavour and then seeing it a couple of weeks after docked at the ISS, I have been obsessed in spotting it in the night sky! Unfortunately, there have been many conflicts up till now (clouds, time, school responsibilities,...)! After reading a post created by Phil announcing that the International Space Station would transit the moon, I quickly checked the weather outside but the horizon was littered with clouds once again. About half an hour later, the Stellarium program highlighted the path of the ISS and I looked through my window out of instinct: It was happening at that very moment and the clouds were,.. GONE! I had no time to take my telescope outside. The ISS was quickly making it's way across the sky and I have trouble taking "my behemoth" outside by myself. I therefore grabbed my birdwatching binoculars, tripped over a chair, uttered some words that should not be repeated online, and headed outside! Most times when searching the sky at night, careful scrutiny is needed. Objects are usually hard to find but the ISS? I stood back,.. It was much brighter than I had expected! There was no mistaking it! With the binoculars I could make out individual lights. My telescope would have surely let me see the structure and some detail but the binoculars were all I had. It went by silently but it's light could not be ignored! Although I couldn't make out the structure, I could see the lights very well and it was awesome! I screamed for my husband to come but by the time he made his way outside, there was only a few glimpses left before it disappeared over the horizon. Now, lets see, the first two steps are done: Step 1: Locate and see the ISS for the first time with the naked eye. Step 2: See the ISS with the help of binoculars. Step 3: See the ISS with my telescope. This will be a little hard since it travels pretty fast across the sky. My dobsonian will have to be set in a way to intersect it's trajectory. Step 4: Capture the ISS with my camera as it passes by my eyepiece. Now,.. that will surely be a feat! I believe that the best way to do this would be with a video camera to then stack the individual video files into a picture. For now, I sit back and relish what I have experienced. Feel like giving it a try? I recommend using this SITE (and Stellarium of course)! Isabelle

stolenfeather

stolenfeather

 

new to astronomy

hi everyone. i have only within the last year got into astronomy. i have a celestron astromaster and a meade LX10 8". i have upto now learnt myself all i know as i have no friends who are into astronomy for advice. i have recently moved to newquay and would like to join an astronomy club to help me understand and learn my telescopes and the night sky. please may someone be able to advise me of a club within the area which i can join to further my astro-knowledge! many thanks, dave. :)

dodgeydodge

dodgeydodge

 

Canon EOS 10d Piggyback photo technique and settings?

Hi I have eventually brought a Canon 10D with a couple of lenses i can squeeze f/4 out of. I am very, very new to this sort of camera there are so many options. Anyhow im apparently supposed to be taking night shots in bulb mode, but bulb mode only allows me a high f/32, no good presumably for night shots the results where poor to say the least. I also noticed it was very hard to take a photo of the moon with LE as it was over-exposed as soon as you go greater than a 1.5 sec exposure. ISO has ranged from 800 to 1600 with varying effects. Wandered whether any of you guys/girls could help me on this, ie whats the best setup (exp, iso, f3/f4, bulb not bulb?)for the camera to take a picture of stars and lunar. I have a remote for it and did try a 5min exposure, just wasnt very good at all. Still waiting for my adapter, hopefully be with me Tuesday so can connect to scope. Thanks folks. Rich T

zimzimma

zimzimma

 

my account hacked?

just received e mail from administrator about bad language? at 5.15 pm on here, i was not on the sgl site at this time, whats going on!! beware passwords may be not safe!! i have contacted ant on admin.

mr saddo

mr saddo

 

Binoculars..?????? Help.!

Hey up folks.! I was wondering if anyone could help me out please?. I have a small 60mm telescope in my garden but its a very llight polluted area (just my luck). So I am going to purchase a pair of binoculars so I can get about for a few midnight bike rides and peep at the optical delights of the night sky. But.! I am lost on the choice. For instance, do i get 15x70's?, are they light enough to hold and focus?, do i need a monopod?, do i need a tripod? (dont fancy lugging a heavy tripod around in a backpack), do i need smaller binoculars?, I cant really afford two sets so I wouldnt like to buy the wrong size. If anyone could give me a few pointers on this I would be most gratefull indeed. Cheers and have a nice day. catdubbs.

catdubbs

catdubbs

 

This is what I've been missing?

June 11th, 2011 The clocked seemed to tick forever yet still,.. the sun wouldn't disappear completely. It wasn't before midnight when most of the stars could be seen and the last light of day disappeared. I waited impatiently since it was the first time I would take my telescope out since my first collimation one week ago. No collimation after using my telescope fifty-eight times! What was I thinking? That's the problem, I wasn't thinking. I was simply nervous about tampering with the telescope. Now? Well, I feel like a chump. It was relatively easy and was done within 30 minutes or less. With time i believe I can reduce this to 10. I was also excited about this stargazing moment because I was having an "inauguration ceremony" for my new Celestron Ultima 2x Barlow lens which consisted of me simply breaking the seal of the box. The balloons and hoopla were all in my mind. The old Barlow I was using had developed a crack (top left) in it. I have no idea how this happened, I never dropped it and am tempted to believe that it was caused by the extreme difference of temperatures of going outside in -40 weather and back to 22 (inside the house). All I know is that I had been using it for months and it was about time I purchased a new one. Let's see here,.... No collimation for 58 nights AND a cracked Barlow? How on earth could I see anything? You'd be surprised what determination will get you! The weather, after a long week of temperatures flirting with the freezing point, was quite comfortable. I knew exactly what my target would be: Saturn. With spring advancing fast, I was well aware that Saturn's moments of fame was coming to a close. With the collimation finally done and the new Barlow, I was in for a spectacular view! The bands were clearly marked with no haziness due to the collimation and this combined with my new Barlow gave me a crisp image. I felt like I was looking through a completely different telescope altogether! I would love to try share this with you but please believe me, the picture taken below does not do justice to what I saw: I filmed this wonderful ringed planet for one of the last times this year and used the program RegiStax to stack the files (for some reason it always comes out small). My summer vacation is looming closer and I'm afraid I won't be able to do this while camping. The reason is very simple: I don't have any electricity out there! Well, we'll see, I will be touching "home base" many times during the following month and a half. Isabelle

stolenfeather

stolenfeather

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