Jump to content

Walking on the Moon

The Moon with 8''


astrolulu
 Share

Recommended Posts

3 minutes ago, astrolulu said:

I will try different methods, but let's face it - the aperture determines the scale and if there is a feeling that the photo would look better when reduced, the only real salvation is the larger diameter of the telescope. I'm working on it too - but so far to no avail ...

Meanwhile - Oceanus Procellarum - the land of lunar ejecta... 🙂

ARISTARCHUS-2022-10-17-B-d1.5x58-Celestr

 

Loving that spectacular detail

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This time I wanted the subject to be light rather than details that are not precisely defined with this lighting. I tried to get the effect of characteristic, lunar "luminosity". I have corrected the brightness many times and I have probably reached the acceptable limit 🙂

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 25/10/2022 at 15:36, astrolulu said:

The night of October 17 in my area turned out to be particularly fruitful in terms of astrophotography - thanks to exceptionally good seeing. The quality of photos details taken that night clearly exceeds what I have been able to achieve with the SCT telescope of the same 8 '' diameter - and even what I was able to get with the larger C9.25. I looked closely at my photos made so far - I've focused for example on Clavius - and I must say that this inconspicuous 8 '' Newtonian really surprised me by showing what he can do with good seeing!

Here are the fruits of that amazing night:

TYCHO-2022-10-17-A-d1.5x58-Celestron-C8-


COPERNICUS-2022-10-17-A-d1.5x58-Celestro


MARE-IMBRIUM-2022-10-17-d1.5x58-Celestro


RUPES-RECTA-2022-10-17-A-d1.5x58-Celestr


SCHILLER-2022-10-17-d1.5x58-Celestron-C8


SINUS-IRIDUM-2022-10-17-1-d1.5x58-Celest

 

Hi @astrolulu - i just wanted to let you know i've "borrowed" the last image in this series to use as my new desktop wall paper - it is absolutely fabulous and i'm enjoying it very much! Thanks.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you very much. I started my adventure with astronomy in the 1980s in Poland. There was no astronomical equipment at that time, I built my first refractor from a cardboard tube and a piece of PVC sewer pipe. You could only dream about amateur astrophotography while watching pictures in Sky & Telescope.

Two revolutions have happened since then. Communism collapsed and astromic equipment became available also in our part of the world. The second revolution is digital photography and the amazing opportunities it has opened up for people like us. If in the 1980s someone told me that it would be possible to obtain such photos with a simple 20 cm Newtonian, I would send him to a psychiatric consultation 🙂

I still cannot believe it and I am constantly happy about every photo I manage to take. But it is a slightly different experience and a different kind of satisfaction than direct contact with the Universe during visual observations. I recently restored an old 1962 Japanese 76/1200mm refractor. I have to say that when it comes to the "jaw dropping" effect, it was this old achromat that made me feel it when I looked at Mars and the Moon through its eyepiece. Amazing feeling of "being there". The unique charm of visual observations ... 🙂

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 hours ago, astrolulu said:

Rupes Recta, Cassini Bright Spot, Tycho... pick 'n' mix 🙂

 

RUPES-RECTA-2022-08-18-1-d1.5x53-Celestr

This is fabulous, as is the previous ones. The expertly processed subtle colour really makes them stand out for me, not to mention the fine, clean detail 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
14 minutes ago, astrolulu said:

It turns out that even in such vertical lighting, with practically no visible chiaroscuro, you can also get an interesting image of the lunar surface:

TYCHO-2022-11-10-d1.5x42.3-Celestron-C8-

 

OOH! wonderful! I'm loving the colours on display here, it gives the moon an organic feel.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The color that we see in the photos straight from the camera is almost imperceptible - the photos look like black and white pictures. This is good and bad at the same time. Bad - because you don't know which direction to go when working on color. Good - because even quite risky decisions can be justified in such a situation 🙂

Edited by astrolulu
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The weather is awful, but there is a reliable friend - Photoshop! It's fair to say that due to Adobe's current policy of updating its products (more often than I use them...), Photoshop likes to crash sometimes. However, I can still count on it more than good weather, and that's what happened now. I returned to the observation session of September 17 due to persistent cloud cover.

Of course it is true that Tycho reigns here. But for me the most important actor is Clavius. It's Clavius I always look at, it's Clavius where I look for small details that allow me to assess the quality of a photo...

TYCHO-2022-09-17-C8-N.jpg

 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mare Nubium with Rupes Recta fault to the east and Bullialdus crater to the west. The Ptolemaeus-Alphonsus-Arzachel series of craters is slowly entering the shadow zone, as are giant Deslandres and its Cassini Bright Spot:

RUPES-RECTA-2022-09-17-C8-N.jpg

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It must be said with appreciation that everyone did a really good job posing for this photo. Everyone brought out as much color as they could. And the blue Aristillus crater made the most effort. Only INA - a mysterious area distinguished by a blue tint, because of which it is sometimes called "Blue Lake", does not want to be blue... As usual.


MONTES-APENNINUS-2022-09-17-C8-N-2.jpg

 

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 minutes ago, astrolulu said:

It must be said with appreciation that everyone did a really good job posing for this photo. Everyone brought out as much color as they could. And the blue Aristillus crater made the most effort. Only INA - a mysterious area distinguished by a blue tint, because of which it is sometimes called "Blue Lake", does not want to be blue... As usual.


MONTES-APENNINUS-2022-09-17-C8-N-2.jpg

 

So so good, can't get enough of these. Thank you.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, astrolulu said:

Only INA - a mysterious area distinguished by a blue tint, because of which it is sometimes called "Blue Lake", does not want to be blue... As usual.

Hi Astrolulu, where would Ina be in your image? It's another very beautiful image!

Mark

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.