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APM 7x50 vs 10x50 coating comparison HELP PLEASE!


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Hello Everyone!

I am new here, but have a question I hope to find some answers to! I recently ordered a pair of APM APO ED 7x50s for my first stargazing bino.  After further reading I decided maybe the 10x50 variant would be better suited to my needs.  I ordered the second pair and now have them both side by side to compare, before returning one.  I've considered most of the other differences, but I notice the shade of green reflected by the eye piece are a much darker olive in the 10x50s vs an emerald green in the 7x50s.  Is this normal?  I am initially concerned it may be a QC issue (for which pair I an unsure), but I'm sure someone in the knowledgeable community will be able to shed some light on my issue! : )

 

Thank you!

APM Bino.jpg

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I think these binoculars only differ in the eyepieces used, and apparently the coating of the 10x50 EPs looks better. I personally prefer 10x50s over 7x50s, because I prefer a smaller exit pupil, but some feel the 10x magnification is difficult to hold steady. I would simply have a look through them and see which you prefer

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Excellent picture. Very clear.

  • 10x wins:  The  eyepieces of the 10x do have better anti reflection coatings. This is obvious from your picture..
  • 10x wins:  The EPs of the 10x have an apparent field of view of 65° compared to the 52.5° of the 7x.
  • 7x wins:    The true field of the 7x is 15% wider than that of the 10x.
  • 10x wins:  The 10x has a better exit pupil for astronomy. 5mm keeps a light polluted sky a bit darker and is more future proof (5mm makes more sense for when one gets older).
  • Tie:           Both show their best views when you keep them stable them on a bean bag, monopod or tripod.

These are just my ideas of course. The 7x50 is no doubt an excellent instrument, but the 10x probably is a better choice. You are fortunate to have both. Congrats! Please compare them in the field, and share your experiences with us. We'd be very interested!

 

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The differences from coating will be small, the exit pupil difference will likely be much larger. Try them out and return the one you prefer the least. I have the 10x50 and they’re really nice and wide and sharp, though I do use a monopod to stabilise the views.

Peter

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Thank you all for the insight! I must start off by saying I'm a rookie to all of this and Ruud's suggestion of a bean bag (i'm imagining a small to medium sized one I can put on the roof of my car and slouch my elbows into) seems like a terrific idea! I purchased a "zero-gravity" Magellan chair from a local sporting goods store for $70 and it also seems to work wonders.  Real nice to be able to lay entirely back with neck fully supported.  A bit of slouching and I can get my elbows on my chest or armrests fairly easily. - But I digress.

I will give a more detailed description of my newbie perspective on the two binocular models in a new thread, so hopefully it will get more exposure that way. In summary I decided to keep the 10x50s once everything I've been reading (and what Ruud mentions) became personally apparent.

Cheers All! 

 

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