Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

sgl_imaging_challenge_banner_constellations.thumb.jpg.6034fe99df7fe590f77a776877551964.jpg

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'double cluster'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Welcome
    • Welcome
  • Beginners
    • Getting Started General Help and Advice
    • Getting Started Equipment Help and Advice
    • Getting Started With Observing
    • Getting Started With Imaging
  • Community
    • Official SGL Announcements and Events
    • SGL Challenges and Competitions
    • SGL Star Parties
    • Star Parties & Astro Events
    • Celestial Events Heads Up
    • The Astro Lounge
  • Retailers
    • Sponsor Announcements and Offers
    • FLO Clearance Offers
    • Supplier Reviews
  • Astro Classifieds
    • For Sale / Swap
    • Wanted
  • Equipment
    • Discussions - Scopes / Whole setups
    • Discussions - Binoculars
    • Discussions - Mounts
    • Discussions - Eyepieces
    • Discussions - Cameras
    • Discussions - Software
    • DIY Astronomer
    • DIY Observatories
    • Member Equipment Reviews
  • Observing
    • Observing - Discussion
    • Observing - Reports
    • Observing - Solar
    • Observing - Lunar
    • Observing - Planetary
    • Observing - Deep Sky
    • Observing - Widefield, Special Events and Comets
    • Observing - with Binoculars
    • Sketching
  • Video Astronomy
    • Video Astronomy
  • Imaging
    • Imaging - Discussion
    • Imaging - Tips, Tricks and Techniques
    • Imaging - Image Processing, Help and Techniques
    • Imaging - Smartphone / Tablets
    • Imaging - Lunar
    • Imaging - Solar
    • Imaging - Planetary
    • Imaging - Deep Sky
    • Imaging - Widefield, Special Events and Comets
    • Imaging - Showcase Threads
  • Science
    • History of Astronomy
    • Observing and Imaging Double and Variable Stars
    • Physics, Space Science and Theories
    • Radio Astronomy and Spectroscopy
  • WADAS's WADAS Discussion Forum
  • Beaufort Club's Topics
  • Swindon Stargazers Club's Topics
  • East Midlands Stargazers''s Topics
  • Central Scotland Astro's Topics
  • SGL Cumbrian Skies's Topics
  • Herts, Beds and Bucks Group's Topics
  • SGL East Anglian Group's Topics
  • South Leicester Observers's Topics
  • South Wales Group's Topics
  • SGL Surrey Observers's Topics
  • South Yorkshire Stargazers's Topics
  • Yorkshire Astronomers's Topics
  • Devon and Cornwall's Topics
  • West Midlands's Topics
  • Essex Cloud Dodgers's Topics
  • Essex Cloud Dodgers's New equipment
  • NLO and Planetarium's Topics
  • Astronomical Society of Edinburgh's Discussion
  • Leicester Astronomical Society's Topics
  • Dorset Stargazers's Topics
  • Hairy Stars Club (Comets)'s Tutorials and Guides
  • Hairy Stars Club (Comets)'s General Discussion
  • Hairy Stars Club (Comets)'s Observing Campaigns
  • Hairy Stars Club (Comets)'s Analysis results
  • Hairy Stars Club (Comets)'s Useful Links

Calendars

  • Astro TV
  • Celestial Events
  • SGL Calendar
  • Astro Society Events
  • Star Parties
  • WADAS's Events
  • Beaufort Club's Events
  • Astronomical Society of Edinburgh's Events
  • Leicester Astronomical Society's Events
  • Dorset Stargazers's Events

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.


Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Interests


Location

Found 17 results

  1. Glad to be back out after some slim pickings in recent weeks, I had a couple of hours before the Moon came into play and spent most of my time pointing my scope in the vicinty of Southern Cygnus and Vulpecula. I began with a couple of open clusters in Vulpecula. NGC 6885 (Caldwell 37) was an attractive arrangement with 15 or so individual members around 20 Vulpeculae. NGC 6940 was a more pleasing site with 40 or more identifiable members, many of which appeared in a narrow-ish band across a kite-shaped asterism of brighter stars to the Southwest. From there I moved a little to the North over the Cygnus border and managed to find Campbell's Hydrogen star (PK 64 +5.1). This is a planetary nebula about five or six arc seconds across. At magnitude 9.5, it was an easy find but very hard to conclusively resolve. I would only go so far to say that it looked less like a star than the surrounding objects, even at 126x magnification. Sadly my scope loses its pin-sharp star view beyond 100x magnification, making small planetary nebulae a real problem for me. I then spent a little time trying to find the Andromeda galaxy NGC 812 but although I was sure I was in the right area, I could not conclusively see anything, possibly because my scope was misting up by this time. I consequently packed up the scope and got the binoculars out for some extended viewing. I concentrated on looking for open clusters in the Casseopeia / Perseus / Andromeda area. The Double cluster (NGC 869 and NGC 884) looked stunning as usual and from there I moved on to Stock 2, a very rich star field on the Perseus - Casseopeia border. To be honest, the whole area is packed with stars, whatever your weapon of choice happens to be. A lovely area of the sky. I moved on to see if I could find any new clusters in Casseopeia. From M103 and NGC 663, I managed to see NGC 654 just to the North of the latter but was unable to spot NGC 659 to the Southwest. Least impressive through the binoculars was NGC 7686 in Andromeda and so I will return to this with the scope at the next opportunity. Slightly better was NGC 6871 in Cygnus at the end of a chain of stars through the middle of the constellation. I am not sure whether any of the stars in the chain are true members of the cluster. Another one to review with the scope, I guess. Seven new objects found this session and particularly pleasing to get a non-NGC planetary nebula among them (even if it wasn't much to look at). __________________________________________________ ______ Observing Session: Tuesday 6th October 2012, 20:15 hrs to 22:15 hrs BST VLM at Zenith: 5.2 New - Revisited - Failed
  2. spaceman_spiff

    Double cluster ISO1600 15x5min Neb filter

    From the album: Photos from Bury

    Stack of 15 x 5 min exposures taken with a Nikon D200 at ISO 1600 10 Darks, 50 flats, 50 bias processed in DSS. Filter used: Baader UHCs Taken on 22-23/11/2015 Processed with less saturation. Only showing part of the double cluster :-(
  3. This started on 10/31/17 I had set my 8SE up at around 7:00 pm Transparency: above average 4/5 Seeing: average 3/5 I viewed a number of objects with my 8SE: M31, M32, M110 was not able to see. M57, M27 are always available. M13, M92 sitting very pretty in a clearer patch of sky than usual to the west. I was early enough to catch some favorites, M8, M16, M17, M20, M21, M22, M23, and M24 I then took a break and when I came back I grabbed my binoculars, 10x50's. First I viewed Pleiades, then Hyades, then over to Mirach, Nu, Mu, and above that to M31. I couldn't see M110 or M32 in binos. I've been searching for Kembles Cascade with binoculars, which I've found with the 8SE, though you can only see two stars at a time at that magnification and narrower FOV. So I'm looking around the general vicinity below Cassiopeia, in Camelopardalis and eventually wander into Perseus and find: The Double Cluster with my binos. I slewed the 8SE over to NGC 884, and NGC 869 to confirmed that I had in fact found the double cluster in my 10x50's I finished my bino tour of the sky on the Coathanger Cluster. I have never viewed the Coathanger cluster through my telescope. Well, maybe once just like M45 and Hyades. I always use binoculars to look at these objects now. I finished the evening on M42 which I end up looking at for nearly an hour through both the binoculars and my 8SE
  4. Astronomical twilight ends 6:18pm Transparency: 4/5 to 3/5 (above average to average) Seeing: 3/5 (average) Location: Fort Collins, CO Elevation: 4997 ft. (1523 m.) Bortle 6 to 7 skies depending upon which direction you're looking. The Double Cluster is pretty clear tonight. I can see it in my binoculars as well. M31 is very clear, and in the Binoculars as well. I then try and catch M8 which is just barely above the building down the hill from me. The time is 5:40pm MST. M8 gives up it’s nebulosity only using the LP filter I use. Orion UltraBlock Narrowband LP filter. I find M20, M21, M23, M10, M24 with my telescope (8SE) and then: At 6:15 pm, I go for M22, this is a new object for me. M22 is nice and clear, with good granularity, and some individual stars using the 17mm which gives me 119x. This is usually the best globular cluster eyepiece so i leave it in there for the next object. But before I do that, I decide I’m going to find M22 with the 10x50’s using my red dot star pointer. Note: The nice 9x50 RACI finder scope I’m thinking about will not be usable in this way like the crappy little star pointer does. A telrad would be nice I suppose and certainly it's clear why people like them. I'm just looking into making my 8SE non-GOTO (because I'm clearly a star hopper at heart and really want a 16 inch minimum travel dob from Hubble Optics). We shall see if i really even need to do that since I'm actually successfully using the 8SE to teach me the sky. Since I'm taking notes and all. I actually am able to find M22 with my cheap 10x50 bino’s. Fuzzy little ball but definitely there and visible to my binoculars. Next up: M55. It’s roughly 6:27pm MST and I continued through my list. M55 is a nice bright glob tonight. I get down and peer through the star pointer and gauge which section of sky I’m looking for and stand up, put the bino’s to my eyes and with very little searching I found M55! Next was M25, not sure I found that with my binos really. Then I was at M18, M17, M16 all three were lovely. It was roughly 6:48pm by then. Because I was mainly looking for nebulosity I didn’t try these three with the 10x50’s. I’m sure i should have. I catch a glimpse of M76 when I thought I was slewing to M16 in the prior group. I thought, what a waste of battery power. I looked at it briefly, and slewed back to the object on the list, M16. Next was M11 which I then found with my 10x50’s. A nice little dusting of stars in the binoculars! Following that was M13 which gave a particularly clear view this evening. I have been looking at star charts for quite a while now, and I have something of a photographic memory (comes in handy during band practice!). So I used the star pointer to give me the section of sky. This section of sky is really hard to look at and not loose your dark adaptation. I use an eyepatch and a black t-shirt pulled over my head backwards as a hood to keep stray ground light out. But trying to find something in the sky and star hop to M13 seems really not doable to me. However, the star pointer does show me where M13 is and I find it easily between Eta and Zeta Herculis. Just southwest? Of Eta Herculis. Now, this is the cool part. Because I’ve looked so often at the Hercules constellation, I had a good idea that you just went back to Eta and then you could find M92 between Eta and Iota Herculis. Slightly more than halfway. And there it is, a short star hop after finding M13, I find M92 without the telescope helping me. From a star chart in my memory. Awesome. Emboldened by this additional object added to my list of things I’ve seen with my 10x50 binos, I went back to Cassiopeia and hunted around there using the 10x50's to look for NGC 663 and NGC 7789. I definitely see NGC 663. I find M45, Hyades, Aldebaran, I use Delta and Gamma Cas to point me towards NGC 884 and NGC 869 aka the Double Cluster. As always, it is beautiful to see. I really like the 10x50’s. Really looking forward to the 20x80’s I’m getting next. Next I aimed my 8SE towards M57. I tried to see that with my 10x50’s but couldn’t. I thought I did but couldn’t confirm it. About 7:30pm MST I slewed over to M56. This is a nice Globular. Bright, granularity, some individual stars. Very nice. I go for this one in the bino’s and there it is! At 7:39 or so, M27 was up in the 8SE and i tried for that with the 10x50’s and I do believe I found that as well! M71 right after that, and yes, I did in fact use the 10x50’s on this object and found it as well. From M71 I found the Coathanger Cluster. So there are a couple new, easy to find (i think) objects M27 and M71 between Deneb and Altair just south of the coathanger cluster. I’m sure I can do better at star hopping but this is a lot of fun making my 8SE actually teach me something. M29, the cooling tower, very nice in the scope, very not found in the bino’s. I’ve been looking for this object in the binos for a while. It’s pretty easy to know where it is, there all close to Deneb and all. It being just south and above of Gamma Cygni. But seeing the cooling tower in the 10x50’s might be impossible. Maybe the 20x80’s. I went on to M15 around 7:43 pm MST. Very bright! Wow, this is amazingly bright! I handily found this in my binos as well!. M2, M73, M72 all found first by the 8SE and then by star pointer to my binos. Right at 8:00 pm MST I saw M30 on the list. I know this is a new object. So my crazy memory tells me. So i slew to M30 and gaze upon its beauty for many minutes in the 8SE. I find it easily in my binos with the help of my telescope. Last couple objects on the list: M77 - 8:09 pm MST this is only visible by slewing the telescope and introducing motion. I did not find it with the 10x50’s. M76, which was given a glimpse earlier was not findable by my lazy, about to call it a night, eye. The temperature was 36 degrees and my hands were beginning to hurt from the cold a bit. The thought of going inside and playing guitar instead of freezing in the somewhat stout wind (6 or 7 miles per hour) is probably why I couldn’t find the little dumbbell nebula. I see one object on my list from that night I skipped. M34. It keeps getting on the list then falling off at the last minute… it’s still early in the season for that object though. Although I didn’t even stay out long enough to see Orion coming up (over the tree). I thought to myself, as I packed things up around 8:20pm MST, that was a pretty short session. But it was action packed with lots of new bino objects found! Tonight (11-14-17) the transparency is “transparent” it is supposed to be cloud free but the seeing is bad (1/5) to poor (2/5) and 20 mile an hour winds. So no star gazing with anything but Binoculars in a parka on a zero gravity chair for me tonight. I'll let you know how many of those new targets I can see tonight. Pretty sure I’ll be able to find M13 and M92. M27 and M71 will be trickier But I think I can find M30 again. I'm going outside to try in a few minutes here after I post this.
  5. I took these images on Sat 25th Nov from here in W Oxfordshire. I've got the widefield setup running now using a RPi3 running KStars and Ekos. This controls a modded, uncooled 350d (with Baader filter) and a serial shutter cable, an Arduino motor focuser (as a Moonlite compatible focuser) and the Losmandy GM8 it all sits on. Images were taken through a Canon 85mm f1.8 EF lens at f4.5, exposures were 45 x 300sec (3h45m total) at ISO400 through an IDAS P2 filter. The field is a whisker over 15x10 degrees. Processing was in PixInsight and a bit of work in Photoshop to reduce a bit of amp glow that didn't calibrate out fully. Fairly pleased with this (though the Heart and Soul have come out maybe a little red - the colour calibration uses PI's PCC tool, and the IDAS filter might throw it a bit), but there's some other areas of interest coming through in the image. Annotated image attached but there are a few other bits that PI doesn't grab - there's a small area of reflection nebula (LBN 142.14+01.97) to the left of Sh2-202 that's just coming through. Also, unlabelled are Stock 2 (between the Heart and the Double Cluster) and for the interested clouded out astronomer, galaxies Maffei 1 and 2 are visible in frame just below the Heart (labelled as Sh2-191 and Sh2-197). Thanks for taking a look!
  6. Atlantean98

    Double Cluster (Wide View)

    From the album: Clusters

    Ahh, the Double Cluster... I cropped the image down so the clusters would be right in the middle of the image. Just as beautiful as it is when viewed in the telescope where the stars brighten up the eyepiece and you get countless amount of stars in a nursery brighter and hotter than our sun I took this at ISO 400, an Exposure time of 20 seconds (Could have done 15 seconds to prevent trailing), lastly an aperture of F/3.5. This was taken Friday the 27th October 2017, facing North-West at around 19:18. P.S: I know this isn't exactly the Double Cluster people were expecting, but it's the wide field shot, until I can get a better mount and something to move the telescope without disturbing it, it will be wide field shots. But it shouldn't be too long until i get a device for it
  7. orion25

    NGC 884 Perseus Cluster

    A perennial favorite, one of the two magical open clusters in Perseus known as the "double cluster". I took 10x30 second subs, no darks or flats, with my Nikon piggybacking my Orion 127 Mak-Cass, drive on. Considering getting a focal reducer for my cam so I can get both clusters in one shot. Clear skies, Reggie
  8. Sp@ce_d

    Double Cluster By Sp@ce_d

    From the album: The one's I nearly threw away

    This was taken on 13th January 2012 18 Lights comprising of 18 x 3 Min Darks & Flats Camera: Canon 1000D - Self Modded Filters: SW LP Scope: SW 80ED DS + .85 flat/reducer Mount: NEQ6 Guiding: 9x50 Finder guider + CoStar + PHD Processing: Nebulosity, CS3 I didn't get enough subs and got the camera orientation out. Still need to get some more time in to reduce noise... Anyway, this is it so far..
  9. Aenima

    double cluster 2

    From the album: The next step.

    One of my first targets but still trying to get a decent image - clusters are harder than they look to capture due to them being all stars so tracking errors and uncorrected optical problems are very quick to show up in the end result.

    © Aenima

  10. This is our first attempt of the Double Cluster (NGC 869 & 884) We used a Nikon D3200 and stacked 20 images at 30 seconds of exposure, The ISO was set to 1600. https://secure.flickr.com/photos/112147206@N05/12109371435/ Opinions please! we think it turned out well for a first attempt but i do think it's a bit red, hopefully the skies stay clear so we can get more images to stack. Thank's for looking
  11. find the gorgeous Double Cluster in the constellation Perseus. It’s a wonderful sight to see on winter evenings, here in the Northern Hemisphere. The Double Cluster consists of two open stars clusters, known as “H” and “Chi” Persei (also called NGC 884 and 869). This is my first light using the Takahashi FSQ85 telescope Captured from London on 13/09/2016 ( poor weather conditions ) Data Takahashi fsq85 QHY9s CCD Ioptron CEM60 LRGB 2 x 300 seconds filter Unguided Higher Res
  12. From the album: Starchasing

    Beautiful area of sky!

    © GALAXY CENTRAL

  13. Jannis

    Double Cluster

    From the album: Astro Gallery

  14. A couple of shots taken last week. WO FLT 98 APO, EQ6PRO,QHY8L,IDAS LP, FF/R TV 08X. M45 - 40X600SEK Double cluster - 40x300sek Rosette nebula - 18x600 sek.
  15. moise212

    Double cluster

    While waiting and calibrating the setup for the Heart and Soul, I decided to shoot ~15 minutes each RGB in 30s subs for the double cluster. I managed less on the B, but I still stacked and processed them. 15 min on R and G, 7.5 on B. ASI 1600, Tair 3s wide open. Unity gain, ~ -15C. Clear skies!
  16. Davide Simonetti

    Double Cluster

    The full Harvest Moon was so bright that the sky wasn't dark enough to capture galaxies and nebulae so the best option on the first clear night for weeks was to return to this old favourite. The previous attempt at imaging this cluster was done with a 400mm lens and the result was pretty good but I wanted to see how the 150mm Newtonian handled it and I quite like how so many of the fainter stars came out. However it always looks much prettier through the eyepiece. 32 x 75 second exposures at 400 ISO (40 minutes integration time). 64 x dark frames 31 x flat frames 21 x bias/offset frames (subtracted from flat frames only) Captured with APT Guided with PHD2 Processed in Nebulosity and Photoshop Equipment: Sky-Watcher Explorer-150PDS Skywatcher EQ5 Mount Orion 50mm Mini Guide Scope ZWO ASI120 MC imaging and guiding camera Canon 700D DSLR
×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.