Jump to content

stargazine_ep35_banner.thumb.jpg.a7c1791d7e682021778de0def357bdbb.jpg

Did I see Uranus Rings and Moon in Nexstar 4se???


Recommended Posts

Hello stargazers, welcome. I had posted a picture yesterday of Uranus that had appeared to show its rings. I am using a Nexstar 4se, a 2x Barlow, and my Neximage Burst Color and capturing hundreds of photos and stacking them for my results. But still had me and others curious to if I were actually seeing the rings of Uranus or maybe just a glare of some sort.

So I got back out there this morning, might I note I live in FL where the weather tends to stay hot so clear imaging during this time of year can be difficult, but not impossible as this image that I stacked 150 out of 300 images taken may show that statement holds true..............or I could just be mistaken the object in the image, but all in all I am feeling pretty confident that I have a decently clear image(stacked 150 images) of Uranus, its rings, and one of it's distant moons. It may be necessary to zoom in on my photo in order to see the moon it should be down and to the right of the planet a good distance in relation to the size of planet, I noticed that looking at Uranus in the photo helped bring the moon out just like stargazing in real-time. 

If anyone can better distinguish what I might have done right or wrong here any help would be appreciated (also forgot to change format save for my images so I am stuck with .bmp and setting it as a download, sorry for any inconvenience.) - - - J47(JAY)

uranusringmoon.bmp

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't open the image but would agree. The rings were only discovered in 1977 with some fairly advanced pro kit, so I'm sure that whatever is in your image is an artifact of some sort.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh wow that is interesting to view them in IR, I was also believing it to be possibly an artifact coming from somewhere but I tried my focus knob both ways and didnt clear any of the fog which would make sense that it would be coming from the barlow and not my focusing. Do you believe that I captured a moon in this photo that appears about 45 degrees down to the right of the planet? very faint but does stick out more than it's surroundings

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the replies I do feel there could be something causing an artifact I was mainly I guess hoping it was not lol I shall try to get another photo stacked and processed tomorrow without the barlow and see what the rings may do then thanks again for the feedback guys. J47

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, J47 said:

Oh wow that is interesting to view them in IR, I was also believing it to be possibly an artifact coming from somewhere but I tried my focus knob both ways and didnt clear any of the fog which would make sense that it would be coming from the barlow and not my focusing. Do you believe that I captured a moon in this photo that appears about 45 degrees down to the right of the planet? very faint but does stick out more than it's surroundings

I played around a little with the levels to bring the "moon" out more and it looks like an internal reflection also.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Cornelius that is very helpful I shall try a few more adjustments next time and thanks everyone for feedback, much appreciated and thanks Philip I was having trouble locating Uranus this morning as my eyepiece is a 25mm so I get a pretty small view of uranus trying to find it is a hassle sometimes but fortunately while tracing around the early morning skies I managed to see within my eyepiece(did not take photos do to my concern with artifacts showing up) but I managed to sweep across and stop on a set of double stars for the first time, which was very interesting to see two stars so close.

Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, Captain Magenta said:

They look like diffraction rings to me...

Just managed to open the file, it foes very much look like a diffraction ring doesn't it?

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Captain Magenta said:

I'm currently in the middle Harold Suiter's Star Testing book, so naturally I'm suddenly an expert ;)

A fine read, but I must give it another go to understand a bit more of it!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By acr_astro
      Dear all,
      yesterday afternoon, the forecasts for the evening were good so I set up the 10" truss-tube Dobsonian on the terrace for cooling down. Actually in the evening the sky wasn't as clear as expected but the cirrostratus luckily did not harm too much. It could have been brighter but anyway ...
      So I tried my new 2x focal extender with the 10 inch scope for the first time and magnified up to 370x. Seeing was okay and I really enjoyed travelling along the terminator from Plato via Copernicus down to Clavius. For the 10"er the focal extender is really an enhancement when viewing the moon and conditions are okay: I saw much more detail in Clavius as I have ever observed before. 
      This would have been a good sketching target but finally I decided to go for a sketch of the magificient Copernicus (named after the famous Polish astronomer by Giovanni Riccioli mid of the 17th century): 
      The crater floor was still completely in darkness, one could only see the bright, round rim of this 93km wide crater. The terraced slopes were just partly in the lunar sunrise yet. Obviously the central peaks are as expected lower than the rim - they were still hidden in the darkness. The two craters north of it are Gay-Lussac A and Gay-Lussac on the way to the Montes Carpates with their eastern parts already visible.
      Here's the sketch:

      Telescope: Martini 10" f/5 truss-tube Dobsonian
      Eyepiece: Explore Scientific 6.7mm/82° with Explore Scientific 2x focal extender
      Date & Time: Jan 22nd, 2021 / 1900-2000 CET
      Location: home terrace, Dusseldorf region, Germany
      Technique: Koh-i-Noor charcoal, whitecoal and chalk blocks and pens on black sketching paper
      Size: 11"x11"
      Clear skies!
      Achim
    • By Kimboman
      Hi I went out this early evening to see if Saturn and Jupiter were observable but the clouds dominated this area.
      The Moon however was in a very clear area so I used my MeadeETX90 with a bino viewer with two 25mm eyepieces and spent some time viewing it.
      The views were really good as the Moon was in the first quarter which is when I feel is one of the best times to view it as it is not to bright.
      The shadows that were being cast were amazing but once again the clouds rolled in so until the next time??
    • By Kadersin
      Hey guys and gals!
      I currently own a Celestron Powerseeker 127EQ.  Do you think a NexStar 6SE is a worthwhile upgrade?
      Pros / cons?
      Thx!
    • By theonlypromg
      The Great Conjunction
      who else waiting for the Great Conjunction between Saturn and Jupiter in 21 December 2020
      Click here to watch
       
       
       
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.