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Marvin Jenkins

Identification of this dso

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Any advice on the dso I stumbled onto. Work has been mad and the moon has been keeping me away from the scope. With the moon in a waining phase, I thought I would have an hour with Jupiter and Saturn before the moon rise and still be in bed before it impacts tomorrows work (Sunday).

Great view of the planets and before I packed up I cast around the sky between the two planets as the milkyway was directly between them (south). At the half way point between Jupiter and Saturn I saw an incredible gobular cluster with what looked like some nebulosity off to the left side (Newt) The two objects were separate from each other and I have looked on planetarium apps but I am left with a guess of M21 M20 trifid nebular.

M8 Lagoon Neb is nearby, could it have been that? or is Lagoon one single object. I feel a little foolish asking but what I see through the eye piece rarely seems to match up with the laptop as far as viewing is concerned, position is mostly spot on. I am going to go old school and look at the star charts.

Marvin

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9 minutes ago, Marvin Jenkins said:

Any advice on the dso I stumbled onto. Work has been mad and the moon has been keeping me away from the scope. With the moon in a waining phase, I thought I would have an hour with Jupiter and Saturn before the moon rise and still be in bed before it impacts tomorrows work (Sunday).

Great view of the planets and before I packed up I cast around the sky between the two planets as the milkyway was directly between them (south). At the half way point between Jupiter and Saturn I saw an incredible gobular cluster with what looked like some nebulosity off to the left side (Newt) The two objects were separate from each other and I have looked on planetarium apps but I am left with a guess of M21 M20 trifid nebular.

M8 Lagoon Neb is nearby, could it have been that? or is Lagoon one single object. I feel a little foolish asking but what I see through the eye piece rarely seems to match up with the laptop as far as viewing is concerned, position is mostly spot on. I am going to go old school and look at the star charts.

Marvin

OMG. Looked at the Michael Vlasov deep sky hunter atlas which I have laminated and ring bound (dont laugh) and the amount of targets in Sagittarius is insane. Only one thing left to do....... bigger scope, clear skies and work it all out with my eye balls.

Marv

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That's almost definitely M22 or - more likely M24 just above it from the description. Its a good one!

edit: actually no, thinking about the description of nebulosity it sounds more like the lagoon, it does have a sort of elongated fuzz off to one side if I remember right.

Edited by Mr niall

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Had a good look and M22 is visually spot on with some neb off to the right. What is the nebulosity? as at first I thought it was a distant spiral galaxy in the back ground of the glob. I only have a 130 newt so my perspective is probably different to star gazers with large aperture kit. 

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There is no nebulosity that you could see through a 130 Newt in the same field as (or even close to) M22. M22 itself is a big, bright globular, by far the brightest in that region. The nearest nebulosity to M22 that you could have seen is M8 - again very bright, but over 7 degrees away to the west.

You will see no galaxies in Sagittarius as you are looking through the densest part of our own galaxy in that direction.

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M22 is very easy to spot in that area but the moon will make it more difficult, there is no nebulosity around M22 though, As said M 8 and M 20 are nearby but whould not be over obvious with the Moon about.

2052843001_M225night07_08.thumb.jpg.cd19c65b9a30b088c2302d69bd317028.jpg

 

Alan

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There is another glob 1° west-north-west of M22, it's NGC 6642, magnitude 8. It looks nebulous when it's not resolved, and in an inverting scope it seems to be left of M22.

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Thanks all and a big thank you for the wide field picture. Definitely not M22 as that is very much on the east side of the milky way. I am still thinking M21 and the triffid nebula as the object was roughly half way between Jupiter and Saturn if you drew a line between them.

I only had one hours viewing before moon rise and that piece of sky that early in the night is low on the horizon, so not best conditions.

Marvin

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I tell you what though, sometimes it is nice to find stuff and even if you do not know what it was it is still an amazing sight to behold.

I quite like taking random tours of the sky as you find things that perhaps you would not have decided to look at. 

I bet the next clear night you will go back and try and find it again and it will then become one of your personal favourite places in the sky.

Enjoy

Mark

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