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Here is my sketch of m81 and m82

sketched in good seeing and in my light polluted backyard

5C1E142E-9B60-4CB8-84AC-21A51C97EA71.thumb.jpeg.7845d9125744b067c5958f71be8f34a4.jpeg250C8F48-98A2-4552-81F1-07A8B7BF0B69.thumb.jpeg.b6a8640f7d7834edb03251118218b404.jpeg(Spiral arms fainter than the sketching , could just make them out as a halo outside of the core

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Well done Kronos for spotting 2 "dim fuzzies" from a light polluted location.

I have so far failed to bag M81 or M82 from my light polluted backyard with an 8" F/5 Newt.

I am  encouraged by your result, so I'll keep trying.

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Thank you lenscap! here is a little guide.

I use this to determine if im close to finding them.

Firstly i find this in my 8x50 finder

 

image.thumb.jpg.59a7cd825254adcb90dea9fc8a39e3f9.jpg

The star pattern out of the field of view towards the north helps me confirm if i found the right spot

once you have found that, look through your scope.image.thumb.jpg.ce8deeaf486e83dad2ce8bed652629b3.jpgyou should see something like thhis,after that, go west(about a first quarter moon diameter) , as the arrow points you should then,find the 2 galaxies.

Feel free to ask me any questions.

Best wishes,clear skies,

Kronos.

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