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Found 18 results

  1. Hello! I'm from Hungary. This is my first post. I am glad to be here. Recently I'm trying to sketch some deep-sky objects. I've made this observation yesterday. Cygnus was near to the zenith and the sky was pretty dark. NGC 7000 is one of my favourite target. I like to observe it with any telescopes, especially with RFTs and with UHC filter. Please excuse my language errors. Gyuri
  2. Kronos831

    M81 and M82

    Here is my sketch of m81 and m82 sketched in good seeing and in my light polluted backyard (Spiral arms fainter than the sketching , could just make them out as a halo outside of the core
  3. Observations of the Sculptor Galaxy ( NGC 253 ) by William and John Herschel ......... Part 2. Observations of "Caroline's Galaxy" by Sir John Herschel, 1830's Sir John Herschel, the only child of Mary Baldwin and Sir William Herschel, was born in 1792 when his father was in middle age and already famous as one of world's leading astronomers. Having excelled in school, and no doubt inspired by his famous elders, John Herschel decided upon a career as a 'man of science' and set out to pursue a wide range of interests; with one particular focus being a continuation of the study of the heavens commenced by his father and aunt, Caroline Herschel. In 1820, with the assistance of his father, John Herschel supervised the construction of a new telescope at Slough in England. As described in the extract below ( from a paper presented to the Royal Society in 1826, titled "Account of some observations made with a 20-feet reflecting telescope ... " ), the telescope had a polished metal mirror with clear aperture of 18 inches, focal length of 20 feet and was modelled on the same design created by his father. It is this telescope, in the 1820’s and early 30’s, following the death of his father and the return of his aunt Caroline to Hanover, that John Herschel used to 'sweep' the night sky and extend the catalogue of nebulae and clusters of stars that was published by his father ( see W. Herschel's Catalogue of One Thousand new Nebulae and Clusters of Stars ). On the 1st of July 1833, having complied sufficient observations, John Herschel presented to the Royal Society an updated list of the positions and descriptions of the Nebulae and Clusters of Stars that he had thus far observed. As noted in the introduction to the paper published in the Philosophical Transactions, he had planned to wait before publishing until he had complied a fully comprehensive general catalogue of objects visible from the south of England. However, due to his expectation of “several more more years additional work” needed to complete the task and his assessment that he now was in a position to address, at least in part, the then current “... want of an extensive list of nebulae arranged in order of right ascension ...”, he elected to present his list, “ ... simply stating the individual results of such observations as I have hitherto made ... “. It was not until October 16, 1863, some thirty years later, that Sir John would deliver to the Royal Society his General Catalogue of Nebulae and Clusters of Stars. As well as introducing many objects that had not previously been recorded, Sir John’s list of 1833 included a re-examination of, and in some cases a small correction to, the positions of many of the deep sky objects observed by his father and noted down by his aunt. One of these re-visited objects was, unsurprisingly, the large and bright nebula discovered by Caroline Herschel in 1783 and recorded in Sir Williams’s catalogue as V.1 / CH 10 ( object number one, of class five ( very large nebulae ) / Caroline Herschel #10 ). In total, John Herschel records around 2500 observations of nebulae and clusters of stars in his 1833 paper; with observation #61 being V.1, the “ Sculptor Galaxy “ . The measured position of V.1is given in RA and the angle from the north celestial pole ( all reduced to epoch 1830.0 ). The description can be interpreted by reference to the legend in the paper. Thus, “ A vL mE vB neb “ becomes “ A very large, much extended, elliptic or elongated, very bright nebula “. He also notes that in addition to this observation, #61, noted down from sweep #306, V.1 was also observed in sweep #292, “but no place was taken”. The figure to which he refers , figure 52, is included towards the back of his paper and is a sketch he made of the Sculptor Galaxy. to be continued ...
  4. After viewing Vesta for the first time last night, I thought I'd sit down tonight as the clouds have stopped any observing tonight so far to do a sketch of what I saw. I inverted the image I drew to make it look more realistic, and marked up the position of Vesta (brightest object in the FOV), and also one other star for location. Should have added in also on the sketch that it was viewed with my Celestron 4SE Mak, with a 18mm Celestron X-Cel LX EP. FOV was about 49 minutes (49'). Thanks for looking. Any tips or suggestions (criticisms even) welcome! Gus Mark II which gives a better idea of magnitudes seen in the EP FOV I think.
  5. Hi everyone, Here's my submission... A sketch (old school, I know...) made on Friday, 27 October. I drew the sketch using my 20 year-old Meade LX10(!), with a 12.4 Super Plossl EP. The sketch was made with white Conte crayons on a black paper A3 sketch book. I'm way, way out of practice, having only recently dusted off my scopes after a long hiatus, so looking forward much more observing, and much more sketching.
  6. Hi, On Saturday the sky was clear. It was nice to go out into the yard. It was nice to draw a bit ... More on my website...
  7. From the album: Sketches

    2B pencil and blending stump on white cartridge paper. Scanned and inverted in Photoshop, stars overdubed with soft brush tool.
  8. Observations of the Sculptor Galaxy ( NGC 253 ) by William and John Herschel The very large and bright 'nebula' discovered by Caroline Herschel in 1783, that we now know as the Sculptor Galaxy, was observed a number of times by her 'dear brother' Sir William Herschel and by her 'beloved nephew' Sir John Herschel, Baronet. Some of these observations were recorded and published in the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society and, with respect to those by Sir John in South Africa, in the book of Astronomical Observations at the Cape of Good Hope. ......... Part 1. Observation of the 'class V nebula', H V.1, by Sir William Herschel, 1783 In 1782, with the fresh patronage of King George III, William Herschel, together with his sister Caroline, undertook the not inconsiderable task of transferring his astronomical equipment from Bath to Datchet ( near Windsor ) in England. Shortly afterwards, in 1983, Sir William began a "sweep of the heavens" with the very large Newtonian telescope of his design and construction. With this mighty telescope's twenty foot focal length and clear aperture of a little over eighteen and half inches, William was able to see fainter objects and smaller detail than any other astronomer of that time. ( source: The Scientific Papers of Sir William Herschel, Vol.1 ) ...... On the 30th of October, 1783, in the course of one of his "sweeps" with the twenty-foot telescope, Sir William Herschel observed Caroline's 'nebula' and noted down ( or perhaps more likely, dictated to Caroline ) a description of what he saw and a reference to its position relative to a 4th magnitude star in the Piscis Austrainus constellation, #18 Pis. Aust. ( with reference to Flamsteed's Catalogue ( or HD 214748 , HIP 111954 as we might call it )). Over the course of the next three years, Sir William would go on to view the Sculptor Galaxy a total of seven more times; as recorded in his paper "Catalogue of One Thousand New Nebulae and Clusters of Stars", presented to the Royal Society on the 27th of April 1786. ( Source ) Sir William's somewhat cryptic notes can be translated by reference to the key provide in his paper and doing so reveals the following: Class: V. ( very large nebula ) Number: 1 Observed ( by WH ): 30 Oct 1784 Reference star: 18 Piscis Austrainus ( Flamsteed's Catalogue; the best reference for the time - we might use epsilon Pis. Aust. or HD 214748 / HIP 111954 ) Sidereal direction rel. to star ( following or leading ): following star Sidereal time rel. to star: 128 min 17 sec Declination direction rel. to star: north of star Declination amount rel. to star: 1deg 39min Observed: 8 times ( up until April 1786, the date of the paper ) Description: - cB: "confidently bright" - mE: "much extended" - sp: "south preceding" - nf: "north following" - mbM: "much brighter middle" - size: 50' x 7 or 8' " CH" denotes that it was discovered by his sister Caroline Herschel The note he refers to expands on details of Caroline's discovery ... ...............................................
  9. RJ901

    NGC 1528

    NGC 1528 at 150x Spent just under 45 minutes at the eyepiece, so ran up against the issue of field rotation (really for first time in my limited sketching experience) and realized the importance of not only anchoring features to certain areas within the eyepiece, but also (and probably more importantly) using the relative locations between 3 and 4 stars at a time to make as accurate a sketch as possible.
  10. Hi all, yesterday evening, I could do yet another lunar sketch with my tiny 3" Mini Dobsonian. Round about one and a half day before the full moon, there were still some craters at the western limb favourably lit showing fine shadows. Telescope: Skywatcher Heritage 76/300 Eyepiece: Skywatcher Planetary 5mm Date&Time: October 25th, 2120-2205 CET Place: home terrace, Dusseldorf region, Germany Technique: chalk and charcoal pencils on black sketching cardboard Size: 3" Diameter Hope you like it! Clear skies, Achim
  11. Yesterday's transit of Mercury in front of the Sun was almost entirely visible from the Netherlands. The transit started around noon in a perfecly clear blue sky and it stayed that way untill around 6pm, when high clouds slowly came in from the south. Unfortunately I missed the end of the event, but nonetheless I was able to watch everything non stop for hours. And it was absolutely wonderful! It started with one of the greatest views I ever saw through my 60mm h-Alpha telescope: the tiny planet's black disk just grazing the side of a prominence. While the dot was just making a dent in de solar disk, the rest of the planet's dark side was ghostly visible against the background of a very dim "halo" next to the brightest part of the prominence. An incredible sight! When the transit proceeded I started making a pastel sketch of the entire Sun's disk. Some small prominences were visible around the edge, and the northern half of the Sun was decorated whith nice filament and mildly active regions. After one hour I finished the drawing with the tiny and inky black dot of Mercury. I photographed the sketch the same evening, and used Photoshop to give it an orange hue and to correct the mirror reversed image. No further alterations were made. And this is a close-up of the same drawing, to show the tiny planet's dot more clearly:
  12. RMcCallum

    M97 and M108

    Hello, This is my first ever attempt at cosmic sketching, any tips or tricks would be much appreciated. I have no scanner, so had to photograph and then invert as a result my skies are grey
  13. RJ901

    IC 4996

    The ongoing deluge continues in my neck of the woods so, instead of enjoying the lack of a moon, I’ve scanned my first sketch, made this past October: Open Cluster IC 4996, in Cygnus. I’ve got a long way to go, especially with getting the scale right, but I definitely enjoy the almost Zen like state of focus that I fall into while spending 30+ minutes on one DSO. It’s also made me spend more time on each object while not sketching; its incredible the details that pop out after 15+ minutes, even in light polluted skies.
  14. Observing Information DSO - M42/M43 Date - 15/03/17 Time - 20:15 Lunar Phase - 89% Seeing - Good Equipment - Celestron Nexstar 6SE Eyepieces - ES 24mm 68 degree Additional info - Wow is all I can say with this one before last night my favourite Nebula was the eagle Nebula now I'm not so sure. First thing that struck me when I started observing was the beautiful pattern of stars the 4 close together in the middle with the bottom right one being the brightest and the 3 star at the bottom. The longer I observed the more detail jumped out at me the swirl of gas almost like an arc was simply breath taking not since I first observed M13 my first ever DSO have I been so overwhelmed. M43 was a bit strange though I could make out the star but no gas cloud or shape to it it's at mag 7 so shouldn't have been to much of a problem maybe next time I will use one of my Nebula filters but my O lll stayed in its case as I didn't feel the need. I also spent some time observing Jupiter, I could make out 4 of the moons 2 of which were very close in proximity these turned out to be Euopa and Lo. The other 2 being Ganymede and Callisto in that order. I could also make out the 2 main bands of Jupiter the north and south equatorial belts but no luck with the Great Red Spot still beautiful to observe though here's an image of stellarium. The moon unfortunately was up a bit late but got about 15 mins observation time beautiful crisp craters and lovely shadows again along the terminator. So a very good session and one of my favourite sketches to date ? Clear skies ?? Richard
  15. From the album: Vicky's Artwork

    The Pillars of Creation Coloured pastels on black paper Sketched 20.11.2015

    © vicky050373

  16. Hi all, today I could just have some quick glances at our home star trough small gaps in the clouds. There was a nice prominence which was already lifted off from the solar "surface". So I gave it a try with a quick pastel sketch. Unfortunately the clouds won and I had to do the sketch in a bit of a hurry. Anyway, I'll sharing it here with you... Telescope: Lunt LS50 THa B600 PT Eyepiece: TS HR Planetary 5mm Date & TIme: March 6th, 2016 / 1200-1215 CET Location: home terrace, Dusseldorf region, Germany Technique: orange pastel pen (Koh-i-Noor Gioconda) on black sketching paper Hope you like it! Achim
  17. RMcCallum

    M51 - 13.03.13

    From the album: Sketches

    Drawn in the cold. Touched up in PS. Scope: SW 130M EP: 25mm BST Magnification: x36 Conditions: Clear then patches of cloud Seeing: Good

    © Rupert McCallum

  18. RikM

    M1 20130206 mcrae SK SGL

    From the album: Sketches

    2B pencil and blending stump on white cartridge paper. Scanned and inverted in Photoshop, stars overdubs with soft brush tool.
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