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Somehuman

Good telescope for beginners.

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In the past few months, I have become very interested in astronomy and have wanted to buy a telescope. I have looked around on the internet and wasn’t sure what to get so I came here to ask for a good telescope for a beginner astronomer. In case it helps, I’d like something to view the planets or deep sky objects with, I don’t mind which. Also I want a price range between £200 and £300.

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Welcome to the forums.

I'm poorly positioned to enable  a good view of the Planets, though my best detailed view of any planet has been that of Jupiter, stunning detail, even the shadow of one of Jupiters Moons was visible. Ive also seen the crescent shape of Venus. 

My telescope of choice is this one, https://www.firstlightoptics.com/dobsonians/skywatcher-skyliner-200p-dobsonian.html and I like BST Starguiders for my eyepieces.
Together they make a good combination, as long as the clouds are not here and the seeing conditions allow.

The supplied link is as good a place as any to start investigating what's available, reliable too!

Edited by Charic
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Any good 8" (200mm) Dobsonian will fit the bill. S/H £200 

 

Ron

Edited by Ronclarke
added text

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I agree, an 8" Dob will give you an excellent start. With a Dob you'll make new discoveries for at least 10 years to come.

If the solar system is your sole passion, you could consider a Maksutov because planets are it's speciality, but for the rest it isn't nearly as suited as a Dob.

 

 

 

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FWIW, I endorse 100% what Charic, Ron and Rudd have recommended!

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Hello and welcome 🙂 

While I agree that the scope recommended is indeed a great scope you might want to think about size, portability and storage.  Where will you observe?  Do you need to carry it?  where will you store it?

Also, are you happy to find objects yourself or would you like the scope to help you?

Let us know and we can guide you a bit more  🙂 

Helen

 

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20x80 binoculars on a tripod. They resell almost instantly and it makes upgrading easy.

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6 hours ago, Charic said:

My telescope of choice is this one, https://www.firstlightoptics.com/dobsonians/skywatcher-skyliner-200p-dobsonian.html and I like BST Starguiders for my eyepieces.

+1 for this. You will not regret getting this scope. I own an 8" Orion XT8 Plus and absolutely love it -- this looks like the equivalent. 

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10 hours ago, Somehuman said:

In the past few months, I have become very interested in astronomy and have wanted to buy a telescope. I have looked around on the internet and wasn’t sure what to get so I came here to ask for a good telescope for a beginner astronomer. In case it helps, I’d like something to view the planets or deep sky objects with, I don’t mind which. Also I want a price range between £200 and £300.

A 200mm f/6 Newtonian on a Dobson alt-azimuth is the usual suggestion, but there are other types of telescopes.  A Newtonian offers the most aperture per pound spent, but that does not come without a price of another stripe.  Newtonians oft require collimation, the alignment of the optical system, at times upon their arrival to the user from the factory, and occasionally thereafter as the telescope is moved about, travelled with, and used.  Look over this tutorial to see if collimating a Newtonian would be to your liking...

http://www.astro-baby.com/astrobaby/help/collimation-guide-newtonian-reflector/

Actually, no one really likes to collimate a telescope, but many muck on through the process, and for the extra aperture.  The need for an accurate collimation increases as you go up in magnification.  For the low to medium-low powers, the collimation doesn't have to be bang-on,  just "good enough".

In order to effectively suggest and recommend, it would be of help to let us know as to the level of light-pollution where you will be using a telescope.

Edited by Alan64

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