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robin_astro

bright supernova in M82 (mag 11.7)

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Caught early of course in this poplular target,  this should be one of the brightest sn for some time. Could  this be the first sn recorded by amateurs with medium/high resolution spectroscopy?  (nothing but clouds and rain forecast here though unfortunately)

Robin

----- Original Message -----
From: "Patrick Schmeer"
Sent: Wednesday, January 22, 2014 9:13 AM
Subject: [baavss-alert] Re: PSN J09554214+6940260: bright (11.7 mag) supernova in M82

> "Classification of Supernova in M82 as a young, reddened Type Ia Supernova
>
> ATel #5786; Y. Cao (Caltech), M. M. Kasliwal (Carnegie/Princeton), A. McKay (UT Austin), A. Bradley (APO) report on behalf of the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory Collaboration
> on 22 Jan 2014; 08:47 UT
> Credential Certification: Yi Cao (ycao@astro.caltech.edu)
>
> Subjects: Optical, Supernovae
>
> At UT 2014 Jan 22.305, we obtained a spectrum of PSN_J09554214+6940260 (discoverer: S. J. Fossey) with the Dual Imaging Spectrograph on the ARC 3.5m telescope. We classify this as a Type Ia supernova with a Si II velocity of 20000 km/s. The best superfit match is SN2002bo at -14d. The supernova has a red continuum and deep Na D absorption.
>
> We further note that at UT 2014 Jan 21.158, the supernova is visible in Palomar 48-inch images but it is too saturated to measure a magnitude. iPTF upper limits (R=20.4 mag) are prior to Jan 13.
>
> Panchromatic follow-up is encouraged."
>
> http://www.astronomerstelegram.org/?read=5786

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cool! I'll be looking with the school's space club if clear enough. a supernova in Year 5 - can't be bad.

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Nice one. Tomorrow night looks like it might be possible, a clear spell forecast for the moment. Fingers crossed, would be my first SN!

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Thanks for posting.   Comets, supernova ,FLO clearance sale - exciting times ahead !

andrew

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A rough estimate suggests that it could reach Vmag 8.5 (based on the standard candle brightness of type 1 supernovae, which is also in agreement with sn 2011fe in M101 which was at twice the distance and reached V mag 9.8.  The spectroscopy report did mention that the spectrum was reddened by interstellar extinction though so we may have to wait and see.  The  spectrum suggests  we are ~14 days from maximum

Robin

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Interesting post Robin. Maybe, just maybe there will be a clear moment in the next 2 weeks or more. Should be easy binocular SN (my second after SN2011fe)

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I always wonder about how many inhabited systems in the local area get taken out by these supernova's when they go off. It must happen time and time again.

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Caught this last night from Dublin. Got 3 subs before clouds rolled in. Didnt know  about the SN at the time  :D

Delighted.

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Caught this last night from Dublin. Got 3 subs before clouds rolled in. Didnt know  about the SN at the time  :D

Delighted.

Congratulations!

There could potentially  be  pre discovery  images around which would nail down precisely when this one went bang.

Robin

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Amazingly, this sn was visible in images from 15th January. there must be a lot of people who missed out on discovering this.  It was finally noticed by at 19:26 last night by Steve Fossey at the University of London Observatory at Mill Hill during a student training session.   Gianluca Massi took a spectrum using a Star Analyser the same night using his robotic setup, confirming a type 1a. (He has beaten the pros to a confirmation spectrum a couple of times, not sure if he was first this time though)

Cheers

Robin

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Here's my humble pick taken tonight. To be honest I'm amazed i got anything at all, clear, cloud, hazy, cloud etc. Eventually i gave up, cleared up, the sky cleared up..... We all know this story...

Anyhow I'm still very pleased to get a pic and to see it visually. An entire star blowing up millions of years ago!!! Lets hope we get a good look over the coming days/weeks.  :rolleyes: 

post-15373-0-06527800-1390437407_thumb.j

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I always wonder about how many inhabited systems in the local area get taken out by these supernova's when they go off. It must happen time and time again.

I wonder the same. Me and a mate (actually a member on here) decided to see how far SN remnants travel, then checked to see how far away Betelgeuse is. SN remnants travel a hell of a lot further! I wonder if Earth will be affected if/when Betelgeuse goes pop.

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The  first amateur spectra are starting to come in now.

Paolo Beradi using a LHIRES III with 150l/mm grating and David Boyd with a LISA

http://www.spectro-aras.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=766

David Strange using a Star Analyser, posted on the RSpec forum

http://www.flickr.com/photos/39492103@N03/12094578923/in/photostream/ 

(This one also shows nicely  H alpha emission in the spectrum from the galaxy core and a star forming region)

Robin

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for once the weather worked for me tonight. raining all day, cleared on the way home from work. got home to about 50/50 clear skies so put the grab and go 12" dob out. two minutes later I have the Sn in my sights with the 13mm Ethos at about 100x. easy with averted and better with direct vision within the mass of the galaxy - awesome!

went in to eat something while the scope cooled. went back out and complete cloud cover. at least the Sn is 'under the belt'.

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here's my sketch a bit later tonight

post-5119-0-14441600-1390515671.jpg

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Total newbie....where do I find it

Sent from my HTC One X using Tapatalk

If you download Stellarium and find galaxy M82 in Ursa Major, the supernova is in that galaxy. What scope do you have?

ha8a5apy.jpg5utamyga.jpg

These are a couple of star hop charts which should help too

Stu

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Thanks to Stu I learned this method a while back and had always struggled with the more often quoted method.


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