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Shibby

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Everything posted by Shibby

  1. Hi @ecuador, is there a problem with the US server at the moment that you're aware of? Edit: Sorry - ignore that, the problem was my end!
  2. Now that is a classy image - I think it could be perfect!
  3. Excellent. Love this, particularly seeing it in so much context!
  4. Yeah I have no ventilation in my warm room, but it is fully lined with vapour barrier. Just open the door when you finish and let it vent through your well-ventilated scope room. @Gina if you vent in to the scope room, you'll inevitably get turbulence as the warm air escapes and this could actually affect your images. If I ever have my warm-room door open while focusing, the difference is huge - the image goes all blurry!
  5. It depends what you mean by clear. As your DSLR is one-shot colour, you'd want accurate colour correction - that's expensive when it comes to refractors. Newtonian reflectors need a coma corrector and good collimation. Good tracking is very important. As you're in a suburb, a light pollution filter is also something you need to factor in.
  6. Just a quick note on the reflector issue you mention - imaging DSOs with a barlow is definitely not a good idea for a number of reasons and will prove difficult. I understand that brands like Skywatcher do not sell their "DS" editions in the US? [EDIT: sorry, just realised you're in Aus!] There surely must be other brands that have the extra back-focus required to easily reach prime focus with a DSLR though? You asked about cheaper refractors - the problem here is that refractors really need to be very good quality to achieve good quality images, whereas you can get excellent images with a much cheaper Newtonian telescope + coma corrector. In my opinion, the only potential downside that's relevant is that they're slightly higher maintenance and larger, although not necessarily heavier. Remember that the mount is massively important for DSO imaging, so it's wise to invest in that first, giving you the option to upgrade optics later.
  7. Some really impressive and beautiful images! Also, an image by me..?
  8. Congratulations! There were some amazing images last year. No DSOs in the top 3, I think maybe these images speak more to people as they're less "abstract" (in addition to being excellent). Well, @James' image got my vote anyway
  9. Sorry for the very belated reply, but I'll add it anyway in case it's of use to anybody. I used www.clearviewbuyonline.co.uk collection in Peterborough and cost me £16.80 for a unit which was I think about 600x300. They have a nice online designer that lets you add your specs for real-time price.
  10. Shibby

    M78 LRGB

    Very nice. It really is a faint nebula though, isn't it? I imagine you'd need longer subs to bring out all the dusty bits. Ahahahaha!
  11. Very nice - what a tidy little galaxy! It can't have had many interactions with its neighbours (a bit like me )
  12. Hi Sam Very nice work! It's a great nebula. It's a slightly unusual colour balance (with the Ha luminance?), but the detail is really excellent! Try removing some green perhaps?
  13. That's come out very nicely indeed! You've managed great colour considering that you've merged the Ha in and have a relativity smalls set of colour data. 12 hours?? I just don't have the patience for that kind of effort! It was certainly worth it, though.
  14. Nice image with excellent colour - a interesting collection of galaxies!
  15. It looks good to me, the Ha regions are much clearer than the original image.
  16. I found that, with the Baader filter, the raw star sizes were pretty similar. However, as Oiii is generally fainter we tend to push the data harder, increasing the chance of star bloat. I now have a 3nm Oiii which seems to match up pretty well with the 7nm Ha stars after processing.
  17. Thanks, I'll have to try that. I tried adding an additional blue Oiii layer which helped a bit but not much. It's a real problem how different it can look - my newest/best monitor is far brighter than my laptop & work monitors. Do colour profiles help in some way?
  18. Very interesting and different view of this region. I like stars personally, but this does look great - all that data has brought out the really faint stuff, too.
  19. Awesome little galaxy. Lovely detail and colour!
  20. I'm not particularly happy with this one having processed it. The Oiii is a bit noisy and I had to reject a few subs as my balance wasn't quite right on the night. However, I don't think I'll be getting any more data soon, so I'll post it as it is now! I've also been struggling to get the brightness right, as it looks very different on each monitor. How does it look on your screen? Anyone got any tips? The image is bi-colour Ha+Oiii. I gathered some RGB data for the stars, which I applied as a colour layer. The upload is at 50% - it does get scaled down in the post, so click through here for the full upload. Acquisition Ha 7nm: 15x600s Oiii: 3nm 16x600s RGB: 3x4x120s Equipment Atik 460ex Skywatcher MN190
  21. Hmm, sorry I don't know then. As you've probably seen, the documentation just says this:
  22. +1 for this tool. It's so easy to use and gets you nicely aligned.
  23. Binning should be present within the advanced camera settings (Camera tab). https://openphdguiding.org/man-dev/Advanced_settings.htm
  24. Hi Mark, I hope this doesn't sound funny, but I can't help but wonder why you have bought all these filters if you're not sure what they're for?? They all have different purposes in different situations. I suppose the first question is : What camera are you using?
  25. Toggle latches for mine. You can see them in this picture:
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