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Tim99

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  • Content Count

    323
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About Tim99

  • Rank
    Star Forming

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Interests
    Music, Photography,Ham Radio, Astronomy, Woodworking
  • Location
    Western New York
  1. For those of us who like to watch construction videos, here is how I built my deck for the observatory.
  2. One helluva pier alright! It's a 12" Sonotube (which actually measured 11"). It sits on a foundation at a depth of 48 inches. We get heavy freezes here in Western New York. That big tube you see around the sonotube was filled with stone just to help support the sonotube while I poured the concrete. After the concrete cured, I removed that big outer tube and spread the stone around. Total height of the pier was less than 8 feet. Here's a video of the pier project.
  3. Thanks for checking out the project. I considered building a roll-off building but it would probably cost about the same in the end. The SkyShed POD is an easy and portable solution for my Astro-obsession. Down the road, my family would have no use for a permanent roll-off building but they could sell this POD. The 'Tiny House' cabin can be used for many years on this site or even moved to a different location or sold. Just being practical, I guess. I really like the POD. So far, I have spent two nights under the stars in this thing. There is plenty of room for all my gear in those five bays and opening the clam-shell style dome reveals a wide view of the sky and open air feeling. The 4' side walls really gives me a feeling of being outside which is what I like. Having a permanent telescope mount is the best part of the deal. No more dragging equipment outside!
  4. The project began in March and was finally completed in September! It began with clearing the land of trees and brush. I built a "Tiny House" here at home and then hauled it to the site. This will serve as my 'Warm Room.' Then, I build a deck for my SkyShed POD. I am finally up and running in the new observatory and I am very pleased to have a permanent site for my telescope. Here are a few pictures:
  5. I have had some decent success so far with DSO AP. Using Nebulosity for capture and preprocessing. Now, I am ready to take the next step to try to do good post processing. Should I just get PhotoShop and be done with it or what about Pixinsight? I know there is free software out there but i don't want to settle for something that I can't get great results with. I'm at the fork in the road and any suggestions would be appreciated. Tim
  6. Thanks Dan, I found that development and it did indeed fix the problem.
  7. Hello friends, I recently purchased the ZWO ASI224 camera for planetary work and I thought I would also use it for my guide camera. I downloaded PHD2 and the ZWO driver for the camera. I have the camera attached to the computer and mount using cables provided. I opened PHD2 and a set-up wizard appears. I chose ZWO ASI in the supported camera list but I get a message "no camera found". Any ideas? I am using a new Dell Laptop running windows 10. Thanks, Tim
  8. Hello Everyone, I have the ASI224MC and I thought I would use it sometimes to Auto Guide. How do I connect the camera to the guide scope? There is an adapter that came with the camera. Is that what I use? Do I unscrew the lens on the camera and screw in the adapter? How does this work? Tim
  9. Thanks everyone for the encouragement. Some friends have pointed out some things related to "Astronomy" like building orientation and control wiring tips. Hey! Who has more fun than us?
  10. Thanks everyone for your kind words. I still have several issues to work out .... like how AM I going to seal between the two buildings? I have a tree line to my NW. I planned to have the roof roll in that direction. The telescope deck should have good views to the N - NE - E - SE -S - SW - W. That's the plan right now. I am going back up to the site to check out the orientation after dark so I can see for sure which way to orient the Obsy.
  11. Hello friends. I am planning to break ground next spring for my Observatory. This building will be located six miles from home on land that we own. I need a "Warm Room" as Western New York winters get pretty cold! I have looked at a lot of buildings that others have built and after thinking a lot about it, I came up with my design. I draw up my buildings using graph paper and this time I build a scale model so I can refine my ideas over the long winter and be ready to go in the Spring! I decided that I wanted short walls in the telescope room. I like the idea of being able to stand on a deck and view the entire sky all the way to the horizon ( and I am a bit claustrophobic ) so, I decided to build a Gambrel Roof to "roll-off" on these short walls. The Telescope Room will be elevated to allow the Gambrel roof to roll over the top pf the Warm Room with its shed style roof. Tell me what you think. Suggestions. I have all winter to make changes. Thanks, Tim
  12. About Nebulosity ... I downloaded a bunch of programs for the PC then I discovered NEBULOSITY. This is a very good program for about $100. I use Nebulosity exclusively now for Image capture and preprocessing. It yields very good results and is easy to use. One license allows you to use it on a PC and a Mac at the same time so I capture on my PC the come home and process on the Mac..... all with one program. No need to stack with one program then switch to another for preprocessing. Nebulosity has a very cool focusing routine that helps you to focus and fine focus. No need for masks. Here is a very good tutorial on Nebulosity's preprocessing capabilities if you want to watch it:
  13. yeah, I know what you mean about the quality of the display on a Mac. I bought the PC for around $400 and while it's 1/3 the cost of a Macbook, you get what you pay for! I just didn't want to take my Macbook out into the elements. BUT... just the minute I get my Observatory built, I will go back to my Mac.
  14. Hello everyone. I have been reading a lot to figure out which way I want to go to get set up for guiding. I use an Explore Scientific ED80 for my imaging scope. Would a side-by-side arrangement be the way to go? I am using a CGEM and I see adaptors are available to mount my 80mm scope and then mount the guide scope next to it. I was thinking that I have my finder scope on the ED 80 and how would I mount a guide scope on there also/ that lead me to the side-by-side idea. Just wondering how others are mounting their guide scope when using a short tube refractor for imaging? Tim
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