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L8-Nite

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About L8-Nite

  • Rank
    Brown Dwarf

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    California & Wales
  1. I find the age profile to be mainly mature and older adults in my encounters with other observers. For me this has been mostly a go it alone hobby which started long before the internet.
  2. If you have some bush wheels for that Cub, there's room to land at Forest Fields; first checking with the management of course.
  3. For me, it was when I realized it wasn't about the size of aperture, but about having a manageable scope with premium quality optics. Your views are only going to be as good as the weakest link in your optical train.
  4. Fabulous Atlas. Been out of print for awhile and very few were made. I feel fortunate to own one.
  5. Not that one, but mine is an almost identical story which took place around 1964 in Los Angeles, where I witnessed a fireball streaking across the sky towards the west, and actually over the Griffith Park Observatory in the distance. I've posted about this before, and its what got me interested in Astronomy.
  6. Overseas when we had an invasion of wasps or bees in my barn, it was easy to convince them to leave by fouling the air with some chlorine bleach from a repurposed spray bottle.
  7. Acquiring cardboard boxes for shipping a large scope shouldn't be a problem, just go to an appliance dealer and ask if they might have any washing machine, dishwasher, or refrigerator boxes destined for the skip; that's how I got mine. For international shipping I didn't trust cardboard alone, so I bought some 6mm plywood and some battens and made lightweight crates. I then stapled cardboard over them so they could be sent as parcels instead of freight.. For packing I used old foam coushins from a charity shop, which I cut to fit . This might seem a little overkill for some people, but all arrived safely even though the outer cardboard was damaged. The best insurance for a safe delivery is packing everything with the mindset that unconcerned handlers are going to do their best to try and destroy your package. .
  8. Thanks, its my favourite observing spot on the mountain above our home in South Wales.
  9. No, don't buy on a whim, I'm pragmatic in that respect; but have found some Questar and Zeiss gems
  10. Never sold a scope to purchase another. Have always done extensive research including viewing through a scope of similar interest before considering a purchase. I try to apply the minimalist approach to "necessary" equipment in this hobby and have been happy with my choices. Over the years I have acquired more astronomy gear than I'll ever realistically need here in the UK, which means presently we have 5 scopes; which is two too many. I've only sold one telescope, and that was years ago, but have given away several with related accessories to friends and family.
  11. Our 127 Mak came packed in a valise, but as there are other accessories including a dew shield it became necessary to find an alternative method for transport ; and the simple solution was to find a moulded plastic suitcase on wheels large enough to carry everything in one go. So I suggest you save yourself a lot of money by looking in charity shops. I usually look for Astronomy books but often find other useful items for the hobby. The case in the last picture cost a (£) fiver. .
  12. Best time would be around September / early October when summer holidays are over and most people are back to work and the kids are in school. It takes a couple of days to get use to the elevation so camping would be a good option, and the small town of Lone Pine can provide the civilized comforts anyone might require.
  13. If you have the opportunity the next time you are in California, Horseshoe Meadow a few miles east of Mt. Whitney is a fantastic location for observing, although you will have to acclimate as its above 9000 ft elevation; great fishing for golden brown trout also.
  14. I'm confident you will get a chance Paul, I had it at the South Wales star party in Brecon where I recently met you ; Unfortunately the weather was uncooperative so most of us just ended up in the Pub instead of bringing our scopes out.
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