Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

sgl_imaging_challenge_banner_dslr_mirrorlesss_winners.thumb.jpg.9deb4a8db27e7485a7bb99d98667c94e.jpg

riklaunim

Orion Trapesium

Recommended Posts

Well, stars aren't close, so I guess it's deep space :)

- DMK 21

- Red filter (from RGB set, passing red+IR)

- Newtonian 150/750

- no barlows

Version 1:

4249158932_8fa43a0b32_o.png

Hello, this is the blind astrometry solver. Your results are:

(RA, Dec) center:(83.7269169261, -5.40205673236) degrees

(RA, Dec) center (H:M:S, D:M:S):(05:34:54.460, -5:24:7.404)

Orientation:141.69 deg E of N

Pixel scale:1.54 arcsec/pixel

Parity:Reverse ("Left-handed")

Field size :16.41 x 12.31 arcminutes

Your field contains:

The star θ1Ori

The star θ2Ori

NGC 1976 / NGC 1976 / Great Nebula in Orion / M 42

Version 2, shorter exposure:

4249159426_c15f693ae5_o.png

Bit lower: l-Ori:

4249158468_d5be3a6db2_o.png

Your field contains:

The star ιOri

NGC 1980 / NGC 1980

Hm.... Good to know that there is a NGC there :) but not with such short exposure and bad polar alignment :mad:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Exposures are below 0,5sec, and this is 1/4" planetary camera. On the first version with bit longer exposure you can see some fog around trapesium - thats the nebula :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Exposures are below 0,5sec, and this is 1/4" planetary camera. On the first version with bit longer exposure you can see some fog around trapesium - thats the nebula :)

Lucky fella... to you the Moon will never appear half empty... :)

Guy..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Looks like the trapesium but what no nebula?

Let me tell you. I have been observing for nearly 30 yrs and a few nights ago i observed M42 with my new 130mm scope under a near full moon and there was no nebula to be seen.

I saw the "trap" stars and that is all i saw. Not a hint of nebula to be seen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's only a suggestion, but it's something I started to play around with before I got set up for DSI work:-

As you're using a short exposure planetary cam, you could try adding frames to muliply the signal. (I would take a few hundred images with the cam and then take batches of about 10, and add them together manually in PSP. Once done I would end up with about 20 "amplified images" which I could stack to reduce the noise). I did manage a few pleasing results on m42 but didn't really persevere with the technique as I acquired a Meade DSI and started on long exposure stuff instead - I did search in vain for software that would automate the process.

Worth a try if you've got the time.

Regards

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Took a while to spot it, well its not a rod, so perhaps an asteroid or satellite..

Good find and capture :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You could sell those nicely resolved Trap stars to a deep sky imager with a decent M42. I'll start the bidding at a tenner! (I'd have gone to fifty for the fifth star...)

Olly

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn't realise you could get all that light in 2 seconds. I get about the same detail with a 30s exposure! Newtonian (130/600)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, it's a 8-bit CCD camera, so the path from black to white is short. And greater aperture gathers more light in total :)

Using normal exposures about 1/900 sec with only 750 focal length I get nice small saturn, but when I set 10 second exposures - dim stars appear about 7-9 mag. So the DMK21 can catch a lot of light :eek:

Edited by riklaunim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Today I've shot trapezium with RGB and UHC-S filters (150/750 Newtonian, DMK21).

- A set of trapezium for each filter: http://i49.tinypic.com/28ldf13.png

Note how many stars you can see with the red filter (which passes also IR).

Friend made a color version of that monochrome Rubbish :mrgreen:

350lb9u.jpg

efhsat.jpg

With no barlow I couldn't use lumicon filter selector so I had to screw every filter to the camera (so every filter is at slightly diferent angle). But it's still cool :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Paradoxically, until I saw it for myself, I did wonder what / where the heck this "trapezium" thing was. In their zeal to capture nebulosity, few imagers show this, [iMO] rather interesting, multiple star system - Well done!?! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.