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riklaunim

Orion Trapesium

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Well, stars aren't close, so I guess it's deep space :)

- DMK 21

- Red filter (from RGB set, passing red+IR)

- Newtonian 150/750

- no barlows

Version 1:

4249158932_8fa43a0b32_o.png

Hello, this is the blind astrometry solver. Your results are:

(RA, Dec) center:(83.7269169261, -5.40205673236) degrees

(RA, Dec) center (H:M:S, D:M:S):(05:34:54.460, -5:24:7.404)

Orientation:141.69 deg E of N

Pixel scale:1.54 arcsec/pixel

Parity:Reverse ("Left-handed")

Field size :16.41 x 12.31 arcminutes

Your field contains:

The star θ1Ori

The star θ2Ori

NGC 1976 / NGC 1976 / Great Nebula in Orion / M 42

Version 2, shorter exposure:

4249159426_c15f693ae5_o.png

Bit lower: l-Ori:

4249158468_d5be3a6db2_o.png

Your field contains:

The star ιOri

NGC 1980 / NGC 1980

Hm.... Good to know that there is a NGC there :) but not with such short exposure and bad polar alignment :mad:

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Exposures are below 0,5sec, and this is 1/4" planetary camera. On the first version with bit longer exposure you can see some fog around trapesium - thats the nebula :)

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Exposures are below 0,5sec, and this is 1/4" planetary camera. On the first version with bit longer exposure you can see some fog around trapesium - thats the nebula :)

Lucky fella... to you the Moon will never appear half empty... :)

Guy..

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Looks like the trapesium but what no nebula?

Let me tell you. I have been observing for nearly 30 yrs and a few nights ago i observed M42 with my new 130mm scope under a near full moon and there was no nebula to be seen.

I saw the "trap" stars and that is all i saw. Not a hint of nebula to be seen.

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It's only a suggestion, but it's something I started to play around with before I got set up for DSI work:-

As you're using a short exposure planetary cam, you could try adding frames to muliply the signal. (I would take a few hundred images with the cam and then take batches of about 10, and add them together manually in PSP. Once done I would end up with about 20 "amplified images" which I could stack to reduce the noise). I did manage a few pleasing results on m42 but didn't really persevere with the technique as I acquired a Meade DSI and started on long exposure stuff instead - I did search in vain for software that would automate the process.

Worth a try if you've got the time.

Regards

John

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Took a while to spot it, well its not a rod, so perhaps an asteroid or satellite..

Good find and capture :)

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You could sell those nicely resolved Trap stars to a deep sky imager with a decent M42. I'll start the bidding at a tenner! (I'd have gone to fifty for the fifth star...)

Olly

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I didn't realise you could get all that light in 2 seconds. I get about the same detail with a 30s exposure! Newtonian (130/600)

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Well, it's a 8-bit CCD camera, so the path from black to white is short. And greater aperture gathers more light in total :)

Using normal exposures about 1/900 sec with only 750 focal length I get nice small saturn, but when I set 10 second exposures - dim stars appear about 7-9 mag. So the DMK21 can catch a lot of light :eek:

Edited by riklaunim

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Today I've shot trapezium with RGB and UHC-S filters (150/750 Newtonian, DMK21).

- A set of trapezium for each filter: http://i49.tinypic.com/28ldf13.png

Note how many stars you can see with the red filter (which passes also IR).

Friend made a color version of that monochrome Rubbish :mrgreen:

350lb9u.jpg

efhsat.jpg

With no barlow I couldn't use lumicon filter selector so I had to screw every filter to the camera (so every filter is at slightly diferent angle). But it's still cool :)

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Paradoxically, until I saw it for myself, I did wonder what / where the heck this "trapezium" thing was. In their zeal to capture nebulosity, few imagers show this, [iMO] rather interesting, multiple star system - Well done!?! :)

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