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The March edition of the Binocular Sky Newsletter is ready. As well as the usual overview of DSOs, variable and double stars, this month we have:

  • The "extra" star in Cygnus
  • Goodbye Uranus
  • Vesta at opposition
  • Grazing occultation of 52 Geminorum
  • A look at mass segregation in open clusters

I hope this helps you to enjoy these spring nights with your binoculars or small telescopes.

To pick up your free copy, just head over to http://binocularsky.com and click on the Newsletter tab, where you can subscribe (also free, of course) to have it emailed each month, and get archived copies.

Graze20210322_52Gem.png.7a22cd4a8877f1bb436191257a2d3cfe.png

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  • 2 weeks later...

OK, I admit it, it's all too easy to be carried away by  solar fever, aperture fever, DSO fever, astrophotgraphy fever etc. But ... when all's said and done, if I had to swap *everything* for just one piece of kit, it'd be a pair of 15x70 on a clear, calm night (all too rare in W Cornwall)...

M36m M37 and M38 in Auriga (plus half of a bottle of brandy) and what more could anyone want. (except, perhaps, sweeping left and right a little).

Thanks Steve, for your indefatigable support of the simplest and best.

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