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clarkpm4242

Cassiopeia to Perseus - 1st use of CLS clip filter

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Interesting colour balance...this is from the jpg stack.  Still working out what to do with the RAW subs!  DSS, Lightroom/PS CS2.

This is from 14 x 100s at f2, ISO800, Canon 7D MkII, Sigma 24mm, AstroTrac.

Plenty of stuff up there!  Cheers, Paul.

LR-001 2400.jpg

Edited by clarkpm4242
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Now that's a few stars... 

Convert the RAWs to 16bit TIFFs..... that will work nicely...

 

 

 

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That's a great capture so much from a fast lens. Your camera is really picking up the red interesting bits is it modified?

Not sure what your raw subs comment refers to but if that is a new canon you will need to use DSS version 3.3.4.

Interesting to see this I've recently done the same area Garnet Star to Kemble's Cascade using my barn door but it's a wobbly mosaic.

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2 minutes ago, happy-kat said:

camera is really picking up the red interesting bits is it modified

Nope.  It is not modified.  Will check DSS when am back at laptop.

Thank you Paul 

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22 hours ago, MarsG76 said:

Convert the RAWs to 16bit TIFFs..... that will work nicely...

It does, thank you!  Used the Canon DPP s/w.

22 hours ago, happy-kat said:

use DSS version 3.3.4.

That helps, thanks.

RAWs are giving a nice outcome from the stacking using the converted files or direct.

Have taken some more subs on the Auriga/Gemini area.  Made sure that focus was definitely *not* on the red side but the clip filter does seem to encourage red halos.  Also have a band near one long edge that I've been cropping.

Cheers

Paul

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There is certainly a lot in that image for less than half an hour of data. FOR MY TASTES it is a little too crowded, but that does not detract from a good result.

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39 minutes ago, Demonperformer said:

FOR MY TASTES it is a little too crowded

I do have that dilemma myself...too deep/much in a widefield image!

I use these in presentations to convey the message that there is sooo much out there in the apparently empty night sky.

Cheers

Paul

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I can certainly get onboard with that.

A comparison shot with what can be seen in the same area from an urban sky with the naked eye would make for a dramatic contrast - especially if it was a presentation to a group of kids.

Edited by Demonperformer
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Wow, there is a lot to see.

So many stars but the dubbel cluster really pops out! Very nice picture!

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