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scarp15

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Everything posted by scarp15

  1. Yep National Parks, there is a campaign currently that the Scottish Parliament (now in collaboration with the Greens) to look at declaring a new national park in Scotland; Galloway & Dumfries is one of the contenders. Merging dark sky park status with national park status can only be a good thing.
  2. Cracking report John, I'd read your report last night and actually had this quite vivid dream about moving to some remote hilly dark sky place, prompted probably by this. Small wide field aperture, is very satisfying under those circumstances.
  3. A perfect serene scene Gerry vividly portrayed. I actually had a dream last night that we'd moved to a remote place on higher ground, across the road, there was a hilly ridge to the south with a dusting of snow along the top and I explored the back yard for the best place to locate the telescope and I knew that I would see the Milky Way from the back garden. Forgotten about until I read your report.
  4. Great report, pretty sure the Dob Mob, such as @estwing had encountered this - Pillars of Creation, some time ago.
  5. Yep, its deceptive - an optical illusion, the spots will be be on the outside.
  6. Wouldn't worry about it, the coatings are quite resilient and prone to this. Just leave uncapped, use an air blower and preferably perhaps on their side (both end caps off) if possible in a warm dry dust free environment. As mentioned, in due course, consider a clean, meantime order Baader Wonder Fluid from FLO with micro cloth and as Gerry say's check out the cleaning page on the TeleVue website.
  7. It does sound like you might not be achieving focus. That or else the seeing is just too unsteady. Also as above, take a look and see if there are any greasy marks on the glass.
  8. I got mine used from ebay at quite a good price. I have seen them listed very occasionally on classified, but yes a bit more expensive than the plossl range.
  9. You would like an 18.2mm DeLite should one come up on the classified.
  10. Hi, several possibilities. First of all, your telescope has not cooled adequately allowing thermals to escape from the tube. secondly the seeing conditions, the atmosphere might be unstable, meaning that as you increase power the image becomes distorted. Are you achieving focus with this eyepiece? A focal length somewhere between the two would be very useful i.e. 14 - 15 or 16mm. Also check your collimation.
  11. Nope, I don't believe it (at least this far north).
  12. It might therefore become necessary to get access to the Lynds catalogue - LDN - of dark nebulae. This was published in 1962 and there are some cross overs with Barnard's much earlier catalogue. Neil @Littleguy80 I understand that you have the Barnard's catalogue, could you delve into whats specifically there featured in NGC 7000?
  13. The top one looks like it will be B353, which in the Sue French article is referenced as 20h 57.4m +45' 29'. However it could also be likely the Birds Nest, described as a dark oval in the Hudson Bay region - B353 embedded in its eastern border considered the 'inkiest' section. These coordinates relate this image reference Gerry to my Interstellarum Deep Sky Atlas, so certainly the Birds Nest and possibly also B353. Not certain about the other sighting, LDN 935, referenced as 20h 56.8m +43' 52', this is located at a lower point below the Gulf of Mexico. Details are in the Sue French article, here though is the map.
  14. I met up with a friend who is a maternity nurse. Increasing numbers of young women having to give induced birth to premature babies because the mothers are quite severely ill with Covid. To compare with flu is nonsense, it ought not matter for how long common sense routine precautions should be implemented, just a pity that in England they are not mandatory any more. Other ways that sharing the experience at a star party or outreach event, will still have many virtues that have been highlighted in this thread.
  15. It perhaps depends upon what you anticipate observing. My backyard can reveal adequately, brighter objects including M1, it becomes necessary to embark on dark sky trips to see the Milky Way, become fully dark adapted and encounter subjects that will be impossible from home. Equally objects observed from home are starkly much more defined when observed in darker skies. It becomes a balance between different perspectives and yet binoculars or a small telescope at a dark site can become very exciting to. There are a few Barnard's class patches to include on a trip out in the coming two weeks mainly within Cygnus but will have another go for B174 in Cepheus. Doesn't matter either way, I will just be pleased to get out under the Milky Way.
  16. Nice report. The Cocoon Nebula is quite difficult and B168, the profile of the Dark Cigar, acts as a guide, leading towards this very dim fuzzy glow that constitutes the nebula, not too easy to discern amongst the inner stars. Haven't attempted it for a while, I used a H-beta filter to gain optimum contrast (still revealing the dark lane of the nebula) at low power with a 14" dob. Dark nebulae are best for late nights on a new moon phase with good transparency. They do require a distinctive mindset and skillful approach to become revealed, that maybe varies from that approaching other such challenging nebulae constitutions. Dark nebulae are being discussed in another thread and maybe this could be picked up more there. B142, B143; Barnard's E is tricky, yet when you get it, you really do get it, just as in the sketches, it is quite a eureka moment. You have to orientate your brain a little to reveal the structure within the very densely packed star field. What works for one does not work for another and seeing dark space as a nebula does require time and patience. My best encounters of Barnard's E, have been with 70x16 binoculars and a rich field refractor. Conversely, there are plenty of other dark nebula that has frustrated the hell out of me. The Helix is a nice bright and quite large subject, but as mentioned a little difficult to locate due to its placement, lacking in finder stars.
  17. Have not ascertained quite how accurate these references are, yet here is one further chart and with some relation to the NAN.
  18. Right, reading through some stuff I had, whilst creating an apirational target list, if this next new moon phase offers a credible opportunity to get out somewhere dark, I managed to locate without needing to photograph the Sue French article Navigating North America. Highly informative, very interesting, if you have not read this Gerry it is quite insightful in terms of clarifying the underlying dark nebulae regions. Barnard 353, is located near to the Birds Nest, there is also LDN 935. The descriptions, coordinates and charts are perhaps overall the most comprehensive analysis of the North America for visual scrutiny. https://skyandtelescope.org/wp-content/uploads/DSW_Oct2004.pdf
  19. Impressive and insightful image and description, cheers.
  20. You could still organise a social. Arrange for meeting to sit out, each bring along a camping chair, wrap up and point out the planetary movements, key constellations, if dark enough, encourage no light so that folk can dark adapt and maybe see aspects of the Milky Way. Could even be lucky and see the ISS or a meteor. That way maybe even enthuse someone to perhaps consider taking up astronomy. Of course if anyone had a pair of binoculars and whilst sat comfortably, could convey the disk a little. A few weeks ago I visited by aging parents, took my scope along, however I had been Covid tested prior to the visit and chanced them looking through an eyepiece at the moon. Would not wish to share with a mix of people, particularly now that delta cases are increasing again, one in seventy within the UK as announced today.
  21. It was great to had arranged a visit Piero and to gain a full insight into your 16" dob build, it is very impressive. A few years ago, when Moonshane was active on this forum, he was occasionally building dobs, both for himself and others and he had offered to build one for me and at a very reasonable cost. It would have required sourcing the mirrors of course such as through John Nichol Optics. However a VX14" OOUK Dob came up on ebay and with more helpful advice from forum members I went instead for that option. Besides my wife occasionally commenting about the 'junk in the corner', no regrets really except that in the past year and a half it has been very seldom used at all. I do admire members such as yourself and Faulksy, among others, who have built their own and having little previous knowledge or skill set. I fit into the same circumstance as others have remarked; in which I do not have the workshop, time, money, specialist tools etc. Also since most of my inspired observing time does require trips out to darker skies, having options with my other telescopes and binoculars is of equal value. For example, I cannot wait to get a chance to go on a dark sky wild camping trip again with my refractor later this year. Perhaps should we live in a more rural setting or even aspire to moving one day (no chance), then the larger truss dob build would become more viable and tempting.
  22. It is quite logical to go with a truss design dob for transportation on mid to large aperture. I use an OOUK 8 and 14" dob, which is of course solid tube. They are a little lighter than alternatives, but of course the 14" out into the street from my terrace town house is quite a spectacle for any passers by, not for everyone, understandably. I love the aperture but do somethings think an OOUK 10" would be the way the go. On the flip side, besides a bit of grunting, it is quick and easy to set up and then later slide back into the car. It can be about using what you've got, applying the way you want to use it, which most times for myself, does involve going out to a dark sky location; which is also long overdue.
  23. Yes the foam packaging acts as a buffer absorbing any vibration. The foam blocks that came with one of mine are used as a cradle which are combined with some foam camping mats. If just taking the 8" out, it is then seat belted across the rear.
  24. Here to is another link of interest, this time I was able to locate and not photograph pages of printouts. This topic has sure got me digging through my filing box. https://www.saguaroastro.org/the-best-of-barnards-dark-nebulae/
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