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scarp15

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About scarp15

  • Rank
    Brown Dwarf

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Interests
    Astronomy , cycling and hill walking
  • Location
    Newcastle Upon Tyne
  1. scarp15

    Bring On The Astro-Shed!

    Looks good and nice idea about using bamboo to help block out some stray light.
  2. scarp15

    Observing goal for life

    A general goal at present is to actually start to get out again to dark sky sessions, too many other foreseeable circumstances currently, so patience is needed. I gain fresh ideas and incentives from here or CN forum. Scrutinise Interstellarum and use as a reference Reiner Vogel, The Sharpless Observing guide; pdf file. Observing habit is quite random, I like to research prior to an intended session what to observe, yet do not dedicate following specific catalogues. My main goal / quest this season is to explore new remote places to venture into and measure the sky brightness with my SQM-L device.
  3. scarp15

    Are you comfortable standing when observing?

    That can be the case and I think I probably stand in that situation to, although I can just extend my observers chair to its max height placement, for my 14" dob (so long as you say, you don't tip and tumble forward i.e if on soft ground, onto the scope). Otherwise perhaps place a knee on the chair, set at a lower position. Observing planets at higher power if standing is I find to be slightly bothersome, surprised by how much you wobble and find it easier to at least lean against something (such as a shed door), or if a stool is available though at the wrong height, rest a knee on for stable support.
  4. scarp15

    Eastern Veil without filter

    Very much looking forward to a seasonal first observation of this region Stephan. Interesting account comparison with a UHC and without a filter.
  5. scarp15

    Just like buses

    I was curious to where the title would lead to. Very nice session again Neil and great to share with your Dad (and to an extent the nocturnal forager). The mix of familiar and new subject not just stimulating for yourself but good to experience the response of another.
  6. Lovely session Alan, those descriptions paint a picture, to those of us who explore this region under darks skies, filtered observing, of something very enticing.
  7. When initially a few years ago I purchased a second hand OOUK VX14 Dob, I did not like the gap created by a baader steel track focuser, as fitted by the former owner. Therefore I used a sealant adhesive which is solid when dry, has worked perfectly well.
  8. scarp15

    Navi - Glare Vs. Nebulosity

    However, Wikipedia has an interesting account for this star, that is seventeen times the mass of the sun. Quote; When combined with the star's high luminosity, the result is the ejection of matter that forms a hot circumstellar disk of gas. The emissions and brightness variations are apparently caused by this "discretion" disk.
  9. scarp15

    Navi - Glare Vs. Nebulosity

    Void of nebulosity around this star as far as I know, so yes probably just glare. The two nearby reflection nebulae, would require a very dark sky and no filter. The easiest nebula to see in Cassiopeia is the Pacman NGC 281, use an OIII, again only in a dark sky and very good transparency.
  10. scarp15

    kielder star party Spring 2019

    Details will be published on the Sunderland Astronomical Society; Kielder Forest Star Camp web page, perhaps a little early to confirm as yet, usually up to six nights around the new moon phase in March.
  11. scarp15

    a nagging Nagler dilemma

    The 13mm T6 had become my first nagler and provided me with my initial encounter of M13, quite superb but subsequently replaced with 100 degree eps for dobsonian use. If considering anew for use with a small aperture refractor and in a compact format, I would perhaps favour a 13mm DeLIte.
  12. scarp15

    A spot of darkness

    Yes possibly, binoculars to would be good for sweeping across. My subsequent attempts last year, were thwarted due to less than ideal transparency or location had become too low, therefore maybe one to persist with.
  13. scarp15

    A spot of darkness

    Located as embedded within the density of the milky way star field, this dark nebula is considered structurally to be one of the easier of its class to observe and visually can be quite impressive. Aperture is not an issue, very good transparency and of course dark skies are necessary to see this quite large pronounced feature stand out against the background star field. A wide field at low power is necessary, no filter required. Begin by drifting across from the star Tarazed, just north of Altair and is featured in Interstellarum. My own encounters, well last year, I used my 8" F6 dob, 31mm e.p, transparency was very good and I did hit on it - however at the time I was not completely clued-up, having not fully researched, definitely a feature I want to explore and resolve fully this year. There are various accounts to read up such as the 'Belt of Venus' observed accounts / sketches, if you do get a chance to observe this Neil, look forward to hearing how you get on.
  14. scarp15

    A spot of darkness

    When we do get an effective return to dark skies, Low power wide angle for Barnard E, B142 & B143, dark nebulae Aquila, will be back on the agenda. Yep that looks like a good trip lined up Stu, so much to look forward to late Summer, early Autumn.
  15. Interesting, I have tried, with difficulty, and some certainty, to observe the little Veil, this involved image is very appealing.
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