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alanjgreen

Supernova in M77 (SN AT2018ivc) Mag 14.5

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Thanks for the headsup. If this weather ever clears(!) might have a go at imaging it.

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Thanks Alan for the 'heads up'. Mag 14.5 is pretty faint for visible attempts - I might need your 20". I will be interested if you get it visually.

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Brightening. Now at 13.6 mag.

classified as a type II

Edited by alanjgreen
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A spectrum from last night using my ALPY spectrograph (modified for faint SNe) and as it looked in the spectrograph guider

Robin

Rsn2018ivc_guider_20181124.png.6e129a0e13877a75e59535d184d15018.pngsn2018ivc_20181124_798_Leadbeater_galaxy_subtracted.png.84130c53a755793359527d066570c290.png

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52 minutes ago, Mark at Beaufort said:

Excellent Robin - I wish the clouds would clear

Thanks Mark,

This was one which got away for me. I was alerted to it the night before by Prof Subo Dong of the ASAS-SN team asking for a classifying spectrum. (He is following up any nearby type Ia SNe) but it was too low by then and the professionals in Japan had already classified it by the time I got to it last night. 

Cheers

Robin

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Nice one, Robin. The spectrograph is very interesting - there seems to be a lot going on at the blue end of the spectrum.

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2 hours ago, Demonperformer said:

 There seems to be a lot going on at the blue end of the spectrum.

That is probably mostly noise at the blue end (The sensitivity of camera and spectrograph grating drops off rapidly at the blue end)  The key features are the slope towards the blue (something hot) and the H alpha emission line which is redshifted and matches the galaxy redshift confirming it is likely a type II (core collapse) supernova in M77 and not something in the foreground. Actually the H alpha line is rather narrow so it could possibly  be a "supernova impostor" Luminous Blue Variable but the way it evolves will probably rule that out.

Cheers

Robin

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Having a look at M77 with my 6" Newt. Its a bit misty and I cannot see the SN but the 10.8 (HIP12668) star nearby is clearly visible with the 9mm Myraid. Hopefully I will be able to put the 12" Dob on M77 later in the week if it stays clear for Friday.

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Fascinating. Needs to brighten to near side of mag 13 for me to stand any chance of seeing it visually though.

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Had a good go at this tonight without luck. Transparency wasn’t great so conditions weren’t on my side. There’s a mag 13 star fairly close by that I did pick up. Doesn’t look like the SN has brightened anymore based on that. Hope you guys managed a go at it. This is the most time I’ve spent with M77 so a worthwhile venture!

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I had a go last night with my 16" at x 200. Couldn't make out anything. Conditions weren't fabulous but I'd say if you see it, it might be using averted imagination. (love that phrase...)

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I managed to bag SN2018ivc tonight with the 20” but it was a challenge. 

Firstly, I tried with conventional eyepieces, the ethos21 and ethos13. It was a struggle to even focus with the ethos13 the conditions were poor down low. I could see the large galaxy disc with both eyepieces but no detail within.

Next I moved to my pvs-14 night vision and was successful initially when attaching it to a panoptic 27mm (x77 magnification) where I was able to see two small point sources within the galaxy disc, one at either end. I made a sketch and based on the location of the nearby bright star, the point source within the lower part of the galaxy was the SN.

I tried with the 55mm Plossl attached to my night vision at x38 magnification and was once again able to see the two tiny point sources within the galaxy disc.

Hopefully a better night will come along and I can get it using some real magnification from my conventional eyepieces.

But it looks like another application where night vision can help us to see what otherwise would not be seen!

Alan

Edited by alanjgreen
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Very interesting and helpful Alan. I will have a go with the 12" but unless the sky conditions are perfect its not looking good. I look forward to your further observing reports.

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I managed to get it tonight with a 10" Newtonian from Edinburgh. Seeing was a bit fuzzy but it's there.

Mark

(Sorry this is observing - should have been in imaging - feel free to remove.)

 

M77 SN ivc L 10x90s 1x1.jpg

Edited by markarian
90s exposures not 120s
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Saw this tonight with the 12" refractor in Cambridge. It's quite tough and is definitely nowhere near the mag 13.2 or 13.6 that has been claimed - it's probably 14.5 if that, and the fact that it's not against a completely dark background doesn't help.

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Looking at this which is so far away and we are able to observe it does it not make you wonder that when Betelgeuse does decide to explode will we actually be a safe. 

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Well I tried last night with the 12" Dob using various mags but could not see it. I notice that on this website - http://www.rochesterastronomy.org/sn2018/sn2018ivc.html that Martin Mobberley stated that his estimate on 1st December was 15.3. So I don't hold out much hope of seeing this visually.

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