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ISS Near miss?!


Simms

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Yikes, that came pretty close ;)

The astronauts all entered the escape pods. A while ago when I told one of my boys that the ISS had escape pods, he asked me, in all seriousness;

"Is that so that they can get out quick if burglars attack them?"

:hello2::D:)

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Scientists estimate that there are more than 300,000 junk fragments in space of up to 10cm (four inches) in length, but there are many millions more pieces that are smaller.

Even fragments a few centimetres in size are a hazard because they travel at many thousands of kilometres per hour.

The one thing I have always admired about our "human intelligence" is the way we plan for the future......

Still you have to laugh.....:hello2::D:D:D

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Read this earlier, wasn't it closer than the station is wide?

This is a problem we need to deal with though, wasn't there a Japanese proposal to catch quite a lot of it in a 'net' then get it to burn up on re-entry?

If thats true then thats very scary! :hello2::eek:

Haven`t heard the one about the Japanese trying to use a net.. Not quite sure how that would work..

WHilst trying to research a bit more on that, I found this page showing an ESA mockup of how much space junk is floating around. Its shocking!

Images of Earth Surrounded in Space Junk | Natural Environment Blog

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It amazes me how they detect these small objects racing around and only centimeters wide.... do they use some kind of sensitive radar system or something?

Using a net to scoop the junk up is an amazing idea, bringing the debris into the atmosphere where it can burn up would also provide a great photo opportunity:headbang:

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