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How can I see color? Like red for M42...


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So how do these pictures have color? Do I have to take a photo with my camera or something?

pretty much, i'm suprised you didn't know this before buying a 8" scope.

I can see a tint of green in the orion nebula though, and some blue tint in the pleides

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I must admit I am not surprised, most advertising for scopes seems to have lovely colour images of DSOs or Jupiter giving a false impression of what you can see. But then a greyish smudge wouldn´t go well with the advertising brigade....

NC

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To see red in nebulae you need a scope of at least 20 inches aperture. Some have claimed to see red in M42 with less, but the reddest planetary nebula, the "Raspberry" in Lepus, is said to need something like 25 inches for its colour to be seen clearly. And that's assuming you have a sufficiently dark sky (limiting magnitude at least 6).

Green and blue can be seen with small apertures in many planetary nebulae (e.g. "Blue Snowball"), as long as you don't use a filter.

At low light levels the eye sees all things as "colourless" (meaning grey or some kind of blue or green, depending on the individual). This is how nearly everything looks through a telescope of small to medium aperture.

BTW the Orion 8-inch dob is a great scope - it's what I started out with.

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Thanks for the help guys. Can't say Im not dissapointed. I really though I'd see these amazing colors and clarity through my 8".

After looking through the POTW section and seeing people taking amazing photos with 8-12" scopes, I really thought I'd see something similar with my XT8.

It's my first scope. Regardless I am still excited at this hobby. A little less so, but still excited :rolleyes:

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I am still excited at this hobby. A little less so, but still excited :rolleyes:

Sorry to hear that.

I think for most people, visual astronomy is about feeling wonder and amazement at the fact you can merely see these things at all - followed perhaps by an internet lookup of a nice big colour photo and some facts and figures to ponder on.

Being able to sometimes see extra detail like dust lanes or planetary storms whilst at the scope is just the icing on the cake really.

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If you want to really see great images, why not start imaging yourself. This is how I started and the only thing that disappoints is the weather.

yea once im capable of spotting things myself Ill start going into imaging. Right now the only object I can spot without issue is Jupiter. Everything else takes a little time.

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I know what you mean, If you pointed a star to me and said" what's the name of that one" I'd be stumped on all but a couple of the bright ones. I'm getting to know a few constellations and use Stellarium software and a mount with goto capabilitys to help get the scope pointing at what I want to image.

I wish I could spend some time observing though, but due to the weather we've had in the UK of late I dont get time.

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Top analogy that - not entirely sure it holds for astronomy though ! But I agree with the basic concept that the pleasure people derive from visual is not only the art of finding, but actually looking in real time at photon's as they make their way across bazillions of miles right into your very own retina.

Direct observation is for me like being hard wired into the universe - but looking at an image... well... it may be stunning, [as many on SGL are] but it's an image.

Now, it's my turn to run for cover !

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yea once im capable of spotting things myself Ill start going into imaging. Right now the only object I can spot without issue is Jupiter. Everything else takes a little time.

I toke some advice from people here and bought a telrad finder. Since then finding things become a breeze. Cost me 39$ on ebay.

It draws 3 circles on the sky at fixed distances and allows you to align by the closest stars.

I just use this maps, they have the telrad circles layed over the objects. Or I make my own maps using Cartes du Ciel.

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Top analogy that - not entirely sure it holds for astronomy though ! But I agree with the basic concept that the pleasure people derive from visual is not only the art of finding, but actually looking in real time at photon's as they make their way across bazillions of miles right into your very own retina.

Direct observation is for me like being hard wired into the universe - but looking at an image... well... it may be stunning, [as many on SGL are] but it's an image.

Now, it's my turn to run for cover !

:rolleyes: fighting talk :) Steve

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But then a greyish smudge wouldn´t go well with the advertising brigade....

NC

Yup. We observers become excited about seeing smudges.

I got excited about seeing my finger print on the lens once.

Stupid, maybe...but I was happy for at least 5 minutes...:rolleyes:

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Are you sure you weren't looking at the Crab Nebula Lulu? I only found that visually once I'd seen it described as looking like a thumbprint!

But with an 8 inch scope there are loads of things to find and see. And remember to relax and keep looking when you find something - the longer you look the more detail you'll usually see. Averted vision (looking slightly off an object) helps you see more deatil too.

Helen

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Are you sure you weren't looking at the Crab Nebula Lulu? I only found that visually once I'd seen it described as looking like a thumbprint!

Helen

Oh, of course, the crab nebula - that was it!

(Sounds a lot more impressive than just being a klutz with lenses!:rolleyes:)

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