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M100 is located in the Virgo cluster at a distance of 55million light years, it is one of the brightest and closest galaxies within the cluster. It's a spiral galaxy with a pronounced bar at its centre.  Quite a few supernovas have been found here, the most recent being in 2019, designated SN 2019ehk which was discovered on 29th April. 

The LRGB image below represents 12.3 hours integration time and was taken with my Esprit 150

(For those that might be interested: the data was gathered between Feb and May 19 , so I was wondering why I couldn't see the supernova in the image. On examination of the individual subframes it transpired that I captured it in  only a handful of subframes, it's first appearance was on the night of 29th April.  So, when I stacked the image,  the supernova was simply rejected as a statistical error..... I think I've come to the conclusion that I'm not cut out for supernova hunting :rolleyes:).

Alan

333367797_29.Final.thumb.jpg.14d20762cc1fd0fd726aaaf92708148c.jpg

 

LIGHTS:: L:26, R:19, G:13, B:16 x 600s, DARKS:30, FLATS:40, BIAS:100 all at -20C.

 

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14 hours ago, alan potts said:

That's really nice Alan, why didn't I get a 150 Esprit when I had the chance, can you not change the setting to get the SN in shot?

Alan

Thanks Alan. On the Esprit 150 - Yes, I'm very happy with the scope, it is excellent quality for the price.

On the SN - unfortunately, the SN only appears in three of my Red sub frames so, attempting to force their inclusion isn't going to work - I'd just end up with a red SN :).  Personally, I doesn't bother me since a SN just appears as another star, albeit in an unexpected position. 

14 hours ago, MartinB said:

Ooh that's outstanding!  Beautifully processed.  Do you have quite a dark sky.  Who wants a supernova messing up the image anyway!?

Thanks Martin :hello: - yes, my site (aka back garden) in East Sussex is quite dark (no street lights), it is also relatively high which seems to help with good seeing. The only downside is that it does get quite windy, although my roll-off roof observatory protects most of the scope from the gusts. 

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12 hours ago, tomato said:

Great image of a subject not so frequently targeted. Was this taken with the SX Trius 814?

Thanks ! - yes, it was taken with my trusty SX Trius 814 - which gives me an imaging resolution of 0.7 arc seconds per pixel. I was a little concerned when I first used it with my Esprit 150 since I thought the imaging resolution might be too small, however, it turned out that for my set up/site that it appears about optimal.

Alan

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1 hour ago, alan4908 said:

On the SN - unfortunately, the SN only appears in three of my Red sub frames so, attempting to force their inclusion isn't going to work - I'd just end up with a red SN :).  Personally, I doesn't bother me since a SN just appears as another star, albeit in an unexpected position. 

ooo, I'd still be tempted to have a go though - red channel as luminance in lighten mode through a super-nova-only mask maybe ?

At least let us have a look at the subs with it in

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54 minutes ago, glowingturnip said:

ooo, I'd still be tempted to have a go though - red channel as luminance in lighten mode through a super-nova-only mask maybe ?

At least let us have a look at the subs with it in

Hmmmmmm.....however, just for you Stuart: here is the result of the image which results from the stacking of the three 600s red sub frames which contain the supernova.  Unprocessed, apart from the stretch and the arrow !

415322307_30.SupernovaM1003redframes.jpg.8471682aa8276f074db2514a6e841d69.jpg

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      M100 is located in the Virgo cluster at a distance of 55million light years, it is one of the brightest and closest galaxies within the cluster. It's a spiral galaxy with a pronounced bar at its centre.  Quite a few supernovas have been found here, the most recent being in 2019, designated SN 2019ehk which was discovered on 29th April.  The LRGB image represents 12.3 hours integration time and was taken with my Esprit 150.
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