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acr_astro

Natural charcoal sketch of the H alpha sun, 2019-06-14

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Dear all,

today I had a look at the GONG H alpha network monitor (http://halpha.nso.edu/) and figured out that the filaments of the past week have now reached the solar limb and at least the final one of it appeared as wonderful set of prominences. On my left/right-mirrored sketch this is the one in the lower left sector - if I consider the 5 hours difference of daytime compared with the previous sketches correctly. So, here's the sketch:

20190614_Sun_H_alpha_small.JPG.e3e27814eb9e15b9f19b341cd2c38773.JPG

 

Telescope: Lunt LS 50 THa B600 PT
Eyepiece: Celestron X-cel 10mm
Date & Time: June 14th, 2019 / 1500-1530 CEST
Location: home terrace, Dusseldorf region, Germany
Technique: natural vine charcoal on white Hahnemühle Ingres mould-made pastel paper
Size: 24x31cm

Clear (and sunny) skies!

Achim

Edited by acr_astro
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    • By acr_astro
      Dear all,
      compared to four days ago, the solar disc and the prominences looked a bit more interestingly varied. I could do a sketch during the lunch break:

      Telescope: Lunt LS50THaB600PT
      Eyepiece: Celestron X-cel 10mm
      Date & Time: May 19th, 2020 / 1300-1330 CEST
      Location: home terrace, Dusseldorf region, Germany
      Technique: red and orange Koh-i-Noor pastels and pastel pens on grey Canson Mi-Teintes pastel paper
      Size: 24 x 32 cm
      Clear (and sunny) skies!
      Achim
       
    • By acr_astro
      Dear all,
      today after work I enjoyed the sunny afternoon on our terrace with the Lunt H alpha telescope. Here's the sketch with natural charcoal of our pretty calm home star.

      Telescope: Lunt LS 50 THa B600 PT
      Eyepiece: Celestron X-cel 10mm
      Date & Time: April 6th, 1530-1615 CEST
      Location: home terrace, Dusseldorf region, Germany
      Technique: natural vine charcoal on white Hahnemühle Ingres mould-made pastel paper
      Size: 24x31cm 
      Clear and sunny skies!
      Achim
    • By acr_astro
      Dear all,
      after weeks of cloudy weather especially during the weekends, I got an opportunity to have a look at our home star and do a pastel sketch of the H alpha sun with some solar prominences and a group of sun spots.

      Telescope: Lunt LS50THaB600PT
      Eyepiece: Celestron X-Cel 10mm
      Date & Time: January 26th, 2020 / 1300-1340 CET
      Location: home terrace, Dusseldorf region, Germany
      Technique: reddish Koh-i-Noor Toison d'Or pastels and pastel pens on white Hahnemühle mould-made pastel paper
      Size: 24 x 31 cm
      Clear and sunny skies!
      Achim
    • By acr_astro
      Dear all,
      this morning, before going off to work, I started the day with a lunar sketch of lunar sunset before sunrise at home. I had put the 5" MAK outside over night, so it was properly cooled.

       
      Telescope: Celestron NexStar 127 SLT
      Eyepiece: Explore Scientific 6.7mm/82°
      Date & Time: January 16th, 2020 / 0715-0745 CET
      Location: Home terrace, Dusseldorf Region, Germany
      Technique: Koh-i-Noor chalk, extra charcoal and whitecoal pens and pieces on Seawhite of Brighton black sketching paper
      Size: appr. 20x30cm
       
      Clear skies!
      Achim
    • By acr_astro
      Dear all,
      yesterday evening I have chosen the lunar crater J. Herschel (named after British astronomer John Herschel from 19th century, the son of William Herschel) which exposed a pretty convexed floor in the rising sun. The crater has a diameter of about 150 km and lies at the northern "coast" of Mare Frigoris.
      The sketch starts with Harpalus in the South, then you can see the 24 km crater Horrebow (named after a Danish astronomer from 17th century) just at the southern rim of J. Herschel. At the northern end of my sketch we have the 71 km crater Philolaus.
      The dominating crater J. Herschel (too be precisely a walled plain) has a quite rough surface which is said to be caused by ejecta from the impact that formed the Mare Imbrium. This rough structure and its convexed shape resulted in a nice three-dimensional appearance.
      Southeast of it, I sketched the secondary craters J. Herschel F and la Condamine B which are located in Mare Frigoris.
      So here's the sketch:

      Telescope: Celestron NexStar 127 SLT
      Eyepiece: Explore Scientific 14mm/82° (due to the poor seeing, I couldn't go for the 6.7mm/82°)
      Date & Time: January 6th, 2020 / 1845-1945 CET
      Location: Backyard, Dusseldorf Region, Germany
      Technique: Koh-i-Noor chalk, extra charcoal and whitecoal pens and pieces on Seawhite of Brighton black sketching paper
      Size: appr. 20x30cm
      And finally here's a photo of my observation place:

      Clear skies!
      Achim
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