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acr_astro

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About acr_astro

  • Rank
    Star Forming

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    Male
  • Location
    Germany, Dusseldorf area
  1. Hi Martin, great lunar sketches! Thanks for sharing with us here. Clear skies Achim
  2. Dear all, thanks a lot for the great feedback and the likes! Clear skies Achim
  3. Dear all, even though the current solar images on the GONG H Alpha Network Monitor on the internet (http://halpha.nso.edu/) seemed to be pretty boring, I set up the Lunt on the terrace to give it a try. Surprisingly I saw several wonderful but faint proms on the solar limb. So I did a sketch with natural charcoal once again: Telescope: Lunt LS 50 THa B600 PT Eyepiece: Celestron X-cel 10mm Date & Time: February 25th, 2019 / 1145-1215 CET Location: home terrace, Dusseldorf region, Germany Technique: natural charcoal on white Hahnemühle Ingres mould-made pastel paper Size: 24x31cm So the GONG images give a good hint for visible details on the sun. But if possible, have a personal look with your own H alpha telescope. Clear and sunny skies! Achim
  4. Hi Pete, great sketches of M42 an M43! Clear skies Achim
  5. Wow, that's really an impressive sketch of M42! Thanks for sharing with us. Achim
  6. Dear all, today I once again had a look at our sun with the H alpha telescope and at first glance, it was really boring! Only when looking in more detail, some tiny - and not at all spectacular - prominences and some light and dark spots on the disc became visible. Not at all a spectacular sketch but anyway here we go: Telescope: Lunt LS 50 THa B600 PT Eyepiece: Celestron X-cel 10mm Date & Time: February 24th, 2019 / 1030-1100 CET Location: home terrace, Dusseldorf region, Germany Technique: reddish Koh-i-Noor pastels and pastel pens on white Hahnemühle Ingres mould-made pastel paper Size: 24x31cm Clear skies! Achim
  7. Hi all, here's my contribution to the challenge. The sketch has been done by me at the telescope and is showing the terminator between Grimaldi, Lohrmann, Hevelius and Cavalerius (named from south to north): Telescope: Celestron 5" MAK Eyepiece: ExploreScientific 14mm/82° Date & Time: February 17th, 2019 / 2100 - 2210 CET Location: home terrace, Dusseldorf region, Germany Technique: Koh-i-Noor chalk and charcoal pens on black 'seawhite of Brighton' sketching paper Size: 21 cm x 28 cm Clear skies! Achim
  8. Dear all, thanks a lot for the great feedback and the likes @happy-cat: Thanks for heads up! I'll give it a try. @Ruud: Wow, that's an excellent painting! Thanks for sharing. Clear skies! Achim
  9. Dear all, the sunny weather today once again lead to a H alpha sketch of the solar disc. This time I once again did it with natural charcoal on mould-made paper: Telescope: Lunt LS 50 THa B600 PT Eyepiece: Celestron X-cel 10mm Date & Time: February 18th, 2019 / 1200-1230 CET Location: home terrace, Dusseldorf region, Germany Technique: natural charcoal on white Hahnemühle Ingres mould-made pastel paper Size: 24x31cm Clear and sunny skies! Achim
  10. Dear all, yesterday evening, I set up my 5" MAK on the terrace and had a look at the lunar terminator. A cone shedding some light to a dark and large crater attracted me. After doing the sketch, enjoyed looking up the craters in my lunar atlas books and in the "Geologic History of the Moon" (Don E. Wilhelms) to learn a bit about what I have sketched. Grimaldi: With a quick check in the maps it turned out to be basin Grimaldi. Named after an Italian physicist and with a diameter of around 170-170 km, this pre-Nectarian basin filled with dark lava (Eratosthenian age) is dominating the western part of the full moon. Yesterday the sun has raised just on the eastern rim of that nice area. Lohrmann: North of Grimaldi, a small lentil-shaped, bright crater rim with still black crater floor was popping up from the darkness: This was the crater Lohrmann with a diameter of just 30km which is supposed to be Nectarian age. Hevelius: The next crater at the terminator has been the Nectarian crater Hevelius. The surface of that crater named after the famous Polish astronomer Johan Hewelcke (Hevel) is supposed to have formed in later Lower-Imbrian age. Inside the 115km large crater, its central peak and the eastern rim of secondary crater Hevelius A appeared in light above the dark floor. Cavalerius: The last crater of the sketched chain further north, Cavalerius, has formed later in Eratosthenian age. Like Grimaldi named after an Italian, this time the mathematician Buonaventura Cavalieri. The diameter of the bright rim is about 60km. The crater floor was still in Lunar darkness. But now have a look at them: Telescope: Celestron 5" MAK Eyepiece: ExploreScientific 14mm/82° Date & Time: February 17th, 2019 / 2100 - 2210 CET Location: home terrace, Dusseldorf region, Germany Technique: Koh-i-Noor chalk and charcoal pens on black 'seawhite of Brighton' sketching paper Size: 21 cm x 28 cm Clear skies! Achim
  11. Hi, you're showing fine sketches here. And what I like most is how you describe the relaxing effect of sketching the moon. That's exactly what I enjoy when doing the lunar sketches. It's much more relaxing than searching for faint fuzzies and trying to see details on them that can be sketched. I'm not at all good in sketching deep sky objects! Hope to see more of your sketches here! Clear skies! Achim
  12. HI Danny, thanks for posting that picture for comparison! Clear skies! Achim P. S. Thank you all for the likes
  13. Hi all, thanks for the great feedback! I really appreciate this! Clear skies! Acihm
  14. Dear all, the second tiny crater sketch of tonight's session depicts Kepler. I must admit that I was a bit disappointed how small lunar crater Kepler is. Telescope: Martini 10" f/5 truss-tube Dobsonian Eyepiece: Explore Scientific 6.7mm/82° Date & Time: February 15th, 2019 / 1930-2000 CET Location: home terrace, Dusseldorf region, Germany Technique: chalk and charcoal pens on black sketching cardbox size: appr. 8cm x 12cm Clear skies! Achim
  15. Dear all, tonight, I sketched lunar crater Gassendi for the 3rd time. This one is done on a small sheet of black sketching cardbox (just 8x12cm): Telescope: Martini 10" f/5 truss-tube Dobsonian Eyepiece: Explore Scientific 6.7mm/82° Date & Time: February 15th, 2019 / 1900-1930 CET Location: home terrace, Dusseldorf region, Germany Technique: chalk and charcoal pens on black sketching cardbox size: appr. 8cm x 12cm Clear skies! Achim
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