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How can I measure seeing quality?


emadmoussa
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Long time of astronomy, but I really never bothered looking into this subject thoroughly. I simply decide the seeing conditions based on what and I can and can't see in the night sky.

Is there some kind of calculator or specialized forecast to determine this factor before hand?

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About as useful as relying on the weather forecast ... :p

As the quality can change by the minute , especially this time of year , I'd rely on the eyeball to tell you what it's like . . . :grin:

Just log-off and get out there , precious few nights to spend half of it worrying about these things if you're in a LP'd urban setting , if you move to a seriously dark location away from the usual UK problems then it maybe of more significance.

If you wait for the nights that are set clear , moonless , perfect transparency and excellent seeing you will spend all your time on here and not outside "doing it" . . . :rolleyes:

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About as useful as relying on the weather forecast ... :p

As the quality can change by the minute , especially this time of year , I'd rely on the eyeball to tell you what it's like . . . :grin:

Just log-off and get out there , precious few nights to spend half of it worrying about these things if you're in a LP'd urban setting , if you move to a seriously dark location away from the usual UK problems then it maybe of more significance.

If you wait for the nights that are set clear , moonless , perfect transparency and excellent seeing you will spend all your time on here and not outside "doing it" . . . :rolleyes:

lol I tend to agree, I only use it in advance to get an idea of what it might be like the next day, more for cloud cover than seeing.

once I've decided to go out I do like to use sat24 though because it shows you the likely cloud movements over the next hour or so. :grin:

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Hi Richard ,

Sat24 is most peoples saviour I think , or should be .... :p

We all KNOW there's cloud coming from somewhere , sometime soon , it's great to be able to see it approaching in pretty much real time . . . :laugh:

I'd have missed many a Solar disc shot without being able to see exactly where the gaps were and when they'd arrive ... :rolleyes:

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Most of our bad weather comes from the west. Worth while keeping an eye on the west.

Avoid buying anything large in a box , this summons clouds when you need

clear skies,

Nick.

Ironically I received a little something a couple days ago and it's been almost clear. Knock wood!

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About as useful as relying on the weather forecast ... :p

As the quality can change by the minute , especially this time of year , I'd rely on the eyeball to tell you what it's like . . . :grin:

Just log-off and get out there , precious few nights to spend half of it worrying about these things if you're in a LP'd urban setting , if you move to a seriously dark location away from the usual UK problems then it maybe of more significance.

If you wait for the nights that are set clear , moonless , perfect transparency and excellent seeing you will spend all your time on here and not outside "doing it" . . . :rolleyes:

Can I at least wait until it's dark :D :D

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Thanks Richard. this is exactly what I had in mind -- downloaded and ready to go out tonight. :)

Yes meant to be clear here too so I'd like to go out tonight but I'm already going out tonight..... If you know what I mean :grin: so don't think I'll trust myself with my scope when I get back.

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Yes meant to be clear here too so I'd like to go out tonight but I'm already going out tonight..... If you know what I mean :grin: so don't think I'll trust myself with my scope when I get back.

I think I'm going out light - EQ3 and 80ED. Last night I was almost caught in thundery rain.

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Here's the latest aviation METAR weather report for your area...

Latest METAR information for EGHI - SOUTHAMPTON

EGHI 031850Z 19009KT 150V220 9999 FEW037 19/12 Q1018
In plain english is....

This is a METAR report for
EGHI - SOUTHAMPTON
.

The report was made
28
minutes ago, at
18:50
UTC.

The wind was blowing at a speed of
9
knots (
10.4
miles per hour,
4.6
metres per second) from the
South
(
190
°).

The visibility was
greater than 6.2
miles (
greater than 10
kilometres).

There were
a few clouds
at a height of
3700
feet (
1128
metres).

The temperature was
19
°C (
66
°F), a dew point of
12
°C (
54
°F) and a relative humidity of 63.8%.

The altimeter setting (airfield QNH) was
1,018
hPa (
30.06
inHg).
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A reference to seeing quality...

Pickering Scale

The Pick­er­ing Scale was cre­ated as a way to describe atmos­pheric dif­frac­tion by William Henry Pick­er­ing (see Wikipedia arti­cle). The scale was cre­ated using a 5inch refrac­tor as a ref­er­ence telescope.

While this scale is not uti­lized these days it still pro­vides a way to demon­strate the effects of the atmos­phere on see­ing con­di­tions in a tan­gi­ble way for peo­ple get­ting started in astron­omy. The scale is shown with a com­puter gen­er­ated approx­i­ma­tion of how the atmos­phere affects dif­frac­tion and over­all see­ing conditions.

Search: Sim­u­la­tion Image Descrip­tion pickering_01.gif Scale 1 — Very poor pickering_02.gif Scale 2 — Very poor pickering_03.gif Scale 3 — Very poor to poor pickering_04.gif Scale 4 — Poor pickering_05.gif Scale 5 — Fair pickering_06.gif Scale 6 — Fair to Good pickering_07.gif Scale 7 — Good pickering_08.gif Scale 8 — Good to Excellent pickering_09.gif Scale 9 — Excellent pickering_10.gif Scale 10 — Excel­lent / Perfect

Showing 1 to 10 of 10 entries

Breadcrumb Trail -> Home » Astronomy » ERAO Tools » Pickering Scale

E.R.A.O

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A reference to seeing quality...

Pickering Scale

The Pick­er­ing Scale was cre­ated as a way to describe atmos­pheric dif­frac­tion by William Henry Pick­er­ing (see Wikipedia arti­cle). The scale was cre­ated using a 5inch refrac­tor as a ref­er­ence telescope.

While this scale is not uti­lized these days it still pro­vides a way to demon­strate the effects of the atmos­phere on see­ing con­di­tions in a tan­gi­ble way for peo­ple get­ting started in astron­omy. The scale is shown with a com­puter gen­er­ated approx­i­ma­tion of how the atmos­phere affects dif­frac­tion and over­all see­ing conditions.

Search: Sim­u­la­tion Image Descrip­tion pickering_01.gif Scale 1 — Very poor pickering_02.gif Scale 2 — Very poor pickering_03.gif Scale 3 — Very poor to poor pickering_04.gif Scale 4 — Poor pickering_05.gif Scale 5 — Fair pickering_06.gif Scale 6 — Fair to Good pickering_07.gif Scale 7 — Good pickering_08.gif Scale 8 — Good to Excellent pickering_09.gif Scale 9 — Excellent pickering_10.gif Scale 10 — Excel­lent / Perfect

Showing 1 to 10 of 10 entries

Breadcrumb Trail -> Home » Astronomy » ERAO Tools » Pickering Scale

E.R.A.O

This has just visually shown me what was happening last night,with about 3 on the listed Pickering scale & this coincided with transparent skies,which may be unusual.

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