Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

sgl_imaging_challenge_banner_inspirational_skies_winners.thumb.jpg.94f78e21c195e385c5621d89ea0b51b9.jpg

SiriusB

Hardest Messier object?

Recommended Posts

I struggled with M83 for quite a while, not because it isn't bright enough but because the low altitude makes it almost disappear due to atmospheric extinction. I finally managed to see it a few weeks ago with my 8" from a really dark spot (latitude 53 deg N, altitude just over 7 deg) but it was very, very subtle. Saw M74 on the same night, also not really standing out but a lot easier than M83.

I heard M83 is not that difficult and a beautiful sight when it rises high enough.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

M101 drove me mad 😬, all those nights in my backyard with a 70mm achromatic refractor searching for hours and hours fighting a unwinnable battle. 2 years later under a dark sky with a 120mm refractor there she was, still a faint fuzzy. It's still a struggle for me.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quite a few of us have been there. It took me weeks to see this galaxy in an 8".

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Waddensky said:

I heard M83 is not that difficult and a beautiful sight when it rises high enough.

Last month I was in California on a mountain top close to the Lick Observatory. M83 was very easy in some 12x70 binoculars and even better in a 9.25 Celestron SCT.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My nemesis is the Eagle Nebula. Try as I might, I just can't see the nebulosity. Thought I once saw a couple dark lanes with averted vision, but couldn't reproduce it for confirmation. But I will get it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the Peak District I've seen M101 in a 4.5" Newtonian on a moonless night near the zenith. It's a very big, but faint galaxy. A 4 to 5mm exit pupil is key for the detection of M101.

M83 was also visible in the 4.5", but it is a very hard object due to its low altitude in the UK. 

For M83 I managed to see a glittering haze covering the area where the galaxy is located.

It is truly amazing what one can see with a 4.5" on a mooonless night in a dark sky location.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.