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frustrated


mog3768
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spent several hours on the sun today but the seeing has proved uncoperative and very difficult to get decsent focus

but did manage this group of sun spots.

sun 23-06-22-1.jpg

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The only thing wrong with this image is the orientation and the rather odd colour.

Look up "Space Weather" for correct orientation.

Were you using a blue filter?

 

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The colour is because I was using a old colour camera not my usual 178mm . The orientation is because the camera was upside down. Personally don't think it matters

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8 hours ago, mog3768 said:

The colour is because I was using a old colour camera not my usual 178mm . The orientation is because the camera was upside down. Personally don't think it matters

An image of an astronomical object is a historical and "scientific" record of that moment or moments. This is not a trivial matter IMHO.

Would you post a picture of a hijacked bus or a famous person upside down? Presumably not. It would trivialise the moment. :wink2:

 

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NO it is just a hobby and fun .I am NOT a professional if you are going to be that critical of people's posts

Then you are going to put a lot of people who are trying there best off posting  in the future so in my opinion

I don't care for your opinion

 

 

 

 

  

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18 hours ago, mog3768 said:

The colour is because I was using a old colour camera not my usual 178mm . The orientation is because the camera was upside down. Personally don't think it matters

Agreed, I think this looks like a great work of art, that a keen “amateur “ (sorry if that’s the wrong word) has achieved.

I guess there are plenty of “accurate” pictures of the Sun out there already.

I’d be very proud of that picture but then I’m not as professional and expert as some on this forum. 😬

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9 hours ago, Rusted said:

An image of an astronomical object is a historical and "scientific" record of that moment or moments. This is not a trivial matter IMHO.

Would you post a picture of a hijacked bus or a famous person upside down? Presumably not. It would trivialise the moment.

Anyone wanting a "scientific" record of sunspots could look on the daily SOHO site.

As anyone who spends any time looking at astro images will know, the orientation of the images varies a lot.  Traditionally, many are shown inverted because classic refractors show the object that way.  I have also seen deep-space images that were mirror-reversed.

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I'm afraid you are missing the point. Every image has the potential to be uniquely important.

Solar flare? Incoming asteroid? Nova? Supernova? Neptune catches fire?
First Contact? Father Christmas on his sleigh? ISS crossing the field of view?

Not all instruments are recording constantly. Few are pointing at the same target.

Far, far worse, than any of the above:
Your fellow forum-mites will hold back from gushing praise.
For even the most unique and utterly astounding/outstanding image. 
Simply because you had your camera on upside down. 🤣

 

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I think rusted you should let the matter drop. You obviously have a strong opinion on the matter

Which I do not share so let's  leave it at that, and not take up forum time bickering.

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