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WBL NEARBY POOR GALAXY CLUSTERS


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This thread can be used to post shots and info for WBL Galaxy Clusters.

Info below from an article.

A catalogue of 732 optically selected, nearby poor clusters of galaxies covering the entire sky north of -3° declination is presented. The poor clusters, called WBL clusters, were identified as concentrations of three or more galaxies with photographic magnitudes brighter than 15.7, possessing a galaxy surface over density of 104/3. These criteria are consistent with those used in the identification of the original Yerkes poor clusters, and this new catalogue substantially increases the sample size of such objects. These poor clusters cover the entire range of galaxy associations up to and including Abell clusters, systematically including poor and rich galaxy systems spanning over 3 orders of magnitude in the cluster mass function. As a result, this new catalogue contains a greater diversity of richness and structures than other group catalogues, such as the Hickson and Yerkes catalogues. The information on individual galaxies includes redshifts and cross-references to other galaxy catalogues. The entries for the clusters include redshift (where available) and cross-references to other group and cluster catalogues.

I am currently working on a list that will include constellation name and names of key galaxies (NGC, UGC, IC), now added (26/09/20). Not all the WBL groups can be located using the NGC, UGC, IC.

WBL galaxy cluster list.xlsx

https://vizier.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/VizieR-3 - gets you to the VizieR tables

19/09/20

WBL 611 in CRB. Includes UGC 10283 and 10285. The three members are bright galaxies in a spaced out triangle but there are other galaxies in view.

Mike

1054610412_WBL61120Sep20_12_01_30.jpg.e506563e8770c0c33f90746041f9a393.jpg1684480538_WBL61120Sep20_12_02_00.jpg.448b8cb9c900768a97215c21f740899f.jpg

Edited by Mike JW
added data base and a link
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Good to see a WBL thread! I haven't seen WBL 611 before now. It is the equal of many of the fainter Hicksons. Hard to tell how many of those blobs are galaxies -- quite a lot of them I imagine.

These groups can turn up some great surprises and quite often appear in starry fields. Here's WBL 666 -- so good I observed it twice (by mistake!), a year apart (it hasn't changed much). The 2019 (colour) version is longer in exposure but results in a much better-defined spiral. There is a lot of action here. The main face-on spiral is NGC 6962, accompanied by NGC 6964. I particularly like the (stellar?) configuration at about 5 o'clock that is another false Saturn.

 

1064827827_Screenshot2020-09-20at20_35_24.thumb.png.e4c550e26f5f2bfa02c47d33f144aad7.png

I have a csv file of these groups but it needs a little more work to convert the RAs and Decs into a non-decimal format. Will post at some point soon.

Martin

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WBL 612 (corona borealis) is a complete contrast. It is spread over a large area and I had to do four images and then combine them.

There are 10 galaxies in total NGC 6105/07/08/09/10/12/14/16 and two others. The group is about 400 million lyrs away. NGC 6107 is a big elliptical - 180,000 lyrs across. 6108/09/14/16 are spirals and about the size of the milky way. 

Screen shot is from Sky Tools 4.

Mike

761585985_WBL612collagephotoshop.thumb.jpg.e8be1e1090bef3e8e630c3aa4a9f8aee.jpg
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1762169381_WBL612ST4labels.jpg.142e564c215fb5a217ffdebf27b4ce48.jpg

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Mike - I had a bit of a look at WBL 612 earlier this year. I didn't do as much work on it as you have. I think I've rotated this snapshot to about match your orientation. It's only a single shot so not covered the full extent as well as you. Interesting to try and pick out some of the patterns. (Well I thought it was anyway!)

2126942165_WBL61227Sep20_21_43_11.jpg.5c2bac75ee39405acadb66243b15d4e2.jpg

 

Cheers

Bill

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Bill S
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Bill, Such a plus your wider fov, the shot is only missing 6107/05 at the bottom. The individual shots I used to make up the bigger picture show more detail.

Thanks for adding your shot into the mix.

I could try my 7" at f5 but the fov would still be more than your set up.

Mike

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  • 1 month later...

WBL 685 in Pegasus.

This group has 6 members. Top is NGC 7342 is a face on barred spiral. Over to the left is NGC 7345 - edge on spiral. There are four more members but the question is, which four?  On the second shot I have indicated the members with red lines. The other lines (yellow but look off white) indicate other galaxies, which when I checked in Aladin (NED data) they have similar redshifts suggesting they too are part of this group.

 

1137095755_WBL68508Nov20_14_53_16.jpg.5b84b14648dff940eb987d651169a930.jpg

 

1411795813_WBL68508Nov20_14_53_16LINES.jpg.68d1a4edafafed4d4b6d73a7e1243b58.jpg

WBL 680 in Pegasus has just three members NGC 7270, (right), NGC 7275 (left) and NGC 7271 (straight down from 7270). The two other obvious galaxies - no info found, so they could be part of this group or not.

 

2083094972_WBL68008Nov20_15_26_58.jpg.dfff0e0f6be1cb25d538427e1759f56d.jpg

WBL 687 in Pegasus - another three member group and what a lovely spiral to observe - UGC 12193 - a loosely wound spiral - SBc, some 150,000 lyrs across. Sky Tools 4 suggests it is interacting with another galaxy but I cannot find any papers on it.

 

93185542_WBL68708Nov20_15_38_53.jpg.eb6d4ba2a4ab6839f04ddab4fece5de7.jpg

 

Mike

 

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Good to see some more of these rarely-observed(?) groups. Agreed, the last one presents a lovely spiral. Some of them are really wonderful groupings. 

I've just dug out my WBL 685 observation from last year and I see from my log that I wrote: "Very interesting field. Star-rich, and with 7 decent galaxies. Seeing looks bad. Upper edge on is NGC 7345 and to its right is mag 15.2 type SBa NGC 7342. The group at the base have mags 14.7-15.6. One of the upper edge ones (the one to the right) appears to have a slight curve to it, or perhaps another gx. There are a bunch of fainter and/or more compact galaxies in this field too." (these descriptions make more sense with my original orientation, but to match yours I've redone the orientation)

635964137_WBL68508Nov20_19_35_30.png.0d9cddc518116b8173f8b417e6753f2e.png

Coincidentally, there was a striking WBL group amongst my observations last night -- will post in a moment.

Martin

PS Note I've added a choice of white or black frame to Jocular. I think I prefer the black frame -- less contrast and easier on the eyes!

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Mike JW, any idea what is going on with NGC 7270? (WBL 680) Looks like two galaxies colliding, seems there are two core’s.  Is there any other info on this? I will have my own dig and see what comes up.

Great work as always, keep it coming. Frankly I have no idea how you are all doing it. Dr Zarkov cloud gun?

Marvin

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This is WBL 086 from last night. As is often the way, I came across a group of galaxies with no clear designation and checked to see if they corresponded to a WBL group, and in this case they did... 

This small field contains 5 NGCs and a member of the Flat Galaxy Catalogue (FGC 337). The main galaxies are highly-contrastive. NGC 1067 is the face-on next to the FGC 337 and is an instance of a bulge-less spiral (SABc). These are really photogenic quite apart from anything else, and you might be interested in a recent dataset listing 200 of them:

https://arxiv.org/pdf/1902.09892.pdf

which argues for the face-ons being counterparts to the edge-ons of the FGC and revised FGC, so it is fascinating to find an 'orthogonal' pairing so close to each other. The third member of that grouping is a plain old elliptical, NGC 1066 and all that. The three are at 201-218 MLyrs, so presumably a physical group.

The right hand side of the image is dominated by the type E-S0 NGC 1060 (which often appears in studies of early type massive galaxies in the local universe). Just above it is NGC 1061 which is an intriguing Sb type. The close up (below) shows a fat core with thick arms. The object at the tip of the S arm might well be a star. Further out to the R is type S0 NGC 1057. This grouping is a little more spread in terms of distance estimates (196-279 MLyrs) but it seems likely that all of these are linked. There are quite a few patches of fuzz in the field.

I let this run for a bit as there was a lot to see (spending *only* 10m30s on this hardly does the galactic variety justice!)

 

589136253_Screenshot2020-11-08at20_10_17.png.85332ef71b334c8f60d578ffbca5666b.png

 

 

537427291_WBL08508Nov20_20_55_08.png.c27fd47cd228d06f63027341fd61359a.png

 

details of NGC 1061

1783239304_Screenshot2020-11-08at20_12_15.png.2d1d52695dea3a23aa5a0702d23c60ed.png

 

cheers

Martin

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40 minutes ago, Marvin Jenkins said:

Mike JW, any idea what is going on with NGC 7270? (WBL 680) Looks like two galaxies colliding, seems there are two core’s.  Is there any other info on this? I will have my own dig and see what comes up.

Great work as always, keep it coming. Frankly I have no idea how you are all doing it. Dr Zarkov cloud gun?

Marvin

Hi Marvin, I looked at Aladin/NED data for 7270 - the extra blobs are stars and not two cores. I wondered like you at first. 

Martin - WBL685 - you should see the Aladin/NED chart for that area - so many X marks indicating numerous objects. Love the WBL 685 image and the black surround.

Tomorrow I will spend time having a good peruse of your WBL 085.

Mike

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  • 2 months later...

WBL 368 - I mouthed a silent WOW as this shot appeared - it is all happening in this shot. There are 13 galaxies in this group but my narrow fov only got 10 of them. There are hints of other galaxies.

1167357_WBL36822Jan21_19_45_26.thumb.png.93147d018961628d6f92f9a654740ae6.png

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shot labelled using Astronometry.

3997 is a peculiar barred spiral (SBc/p), 3999 and 4011 are SO, the rest are spirals. 3987 wins the "dust lane" award. 4009 label is for a star but my SkyMap software labels the galaxy up and to the left of the green label also as 4009!

441213031_WBL368.jpg.34568cde1fea48e232edb7e62d736e0d.jpg

 

Need a wider fov shot from one of you guys with a different set up.

Mike

 

 

 

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I came across these when looking for VV 1487 (which I believe is NGC 3997), not realising this is also WBL 368 (ignore the placement of the WBL 368 label/circle -- still under development!). It really is a lovely field. My shot was not really framed to maximise the galaxy field, though I notice that I caught NGC 4018 -- yet another lovely edge-on.

330726840_NGC399323Jan21_17_55_07.jpg.9a0f6a977b699badf95709504d85961f.jpg

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It looks like a tumbling chain of galaxies. Really interesting capture. Boggles my mind to think hard about I what I am looking at in regards to distance, size and mass. Just a few galaxies in the palm of your hand, ridiculous.

Marv

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Martin, NGC 4015 - I thought it looked familiar - thanks too for your shot. It has taken about 36hrs to recover from the mad early morning outing - where did my youthful vigour go?

Mike

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  • 1 month later...

28/02/21. WBL 121 in Gemini gives you plenty for your money.  NGC 2275 (at the top) - a disrupted spiral, 160,000 lyrs diameter. NGC 2274 (an elliptical, 110,000lyrs across) is disrupting 2275. These two together are classified as VV1166. The third member of WBL 121 is the galaxy on the right - UGC 3537 (loose spiral Sc and about 67,000 lyrs across).

Below the pair and hidden by a star is a mag 17 LEDA galaxy.

1454418326_WBL12101Mar21_11_35_19.png.e5a16d7ecc5615e35b812e5253a83aac.png

Mike

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Interesting group with lots to see (1m45s is obviously enough to get a good image but not enough to savour all that is going on!). Is that a further companion galaxy just right of centre of the elliptical (within the halo), I wonder? A quick look on Aladin suggests a bulge in the right place but as is often the case the Aladin image is overexposed. There is a GAIA source in the right place but that doesn't necessarily mean it is stellar. Could be a supernova of course 😉 There have been SNs in that galaxy. 

Interesting to see the gx peeking out behind the star too. You can see its 'horns' (if I've got the right one).

Here we have 'calima' (suspended sand) in the sky just to add another spanner in the observing works.

Martin

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Hi Martin,

I too wondered about that bulge. There are also two other fuzz spots in the shot as well.  This shot was really just a little desert, the main course had been asteroids. The cloud arrived as I was doing this group hence the shorter exposure than normal. Yes you have the right galaxy with the horns.

Here in GB we a re plagued with low cloud, mist and fog - so that is it for observing for a few days.

The third member (out on the right) - looks like I have picked up a star forming region, below the central core, also hint of a dark lane.

Yet to check all this out on Aladin.

Mike

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WBL 126  in Gemini - I also visited this at the same time as WBL 121. The big 4 galaxies are mag 14, the tiny one is mag 15

Top left - NGC 2294, elliptical, (might be a ring galaxy), 62,000 lyrs diameter , 237 million lyrs away.

Top middle - NGC 2291, lenticular - looks spiral to me in high res images, 63,000 lyrs diameter, 241 million lyrs away

Right of centre - NGC 2289, lenticular, 77,000 yrs diameter, 229 million lyrs away,

Near the star - NGC 2288, elliptical (spiral?), 252 million lyrs away

Bottom  - (R) SAa - spiral with a ring formation, 54,000 lyrs diameter, 234 million lyrs away.

 

205870237_WBL12604Mar21_09_03_19.png.2cf1d7b09b85c852a77712e3de0d425a.png

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