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I'm starting to daydream about EEVA. Do you need a guided mount or will unguided work ? I suppose the answer will depend on what you are trying to view but I live in Bortle 9 and it's all new to me so almost anything is a bonus (although I think it would be great if I could see some DSOs)

If unguided works OK, is it just a question of picking a mount with sufficient payload capacity for the rig plus a margin of safety ?

Thanks in advance

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Having done some more research, I'm going to have a go at answering my own question......... the answer is, generally, no you don't need to guide.

The question of which mount is probably down to budget and personal choice as I see people are successfully doing EEVA with a wide variety of mounts.

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That's right, you don't need to guide. You don't even need an equatorial mount so long as you keep to the typical EEA exposure lengths of sub 30s. I've been quite happy unguided on an alt-az mount for years. I do have a guide camera though -- its the camera I use for EAA 😉 

Martin

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In Bortle 9 skies you probably won't need to go even that long with your exposure. I think just a couple of seconds per exposure will be needed - this of course means almost any decent mount will do - as long as it can carry your scope / camera combination.

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Well that all depends - I have started experimenting with narrow FOV EAA (already did EAA before) with a slow F10 /fl2350 scope and small sized chip CMOS camera - I get images(not great quality) on bright DSO's very fast <15secs BUT there is no way I could stack the images in real time as the movement is too great due to the narrow FOV and movement. So in this case guiding would help but then I am not looking for high quality Astro Pic's.

It depends what you are looking for - if its Astro high quality DSO images then unless you are prepaid to pay mega bucks for your kit then stick to normal Astrophotography IMHO. I am old school and still believe there is  a major difference between EAA and "Normal" Astrophotograhpy . I still support the old views (which no longer seem to exist on SGL) that EAA means  Electronic Viewing of DSO's with either no stacking or just real time stacking. But then thats my take on it and others will disagree.

There is room for any method but for me, EAA on SGL seems to have become too much like "normal" astrophotograhpy and not near real time Electronic Viewing. Even if KIT is evolving to narrow the gap.

Answer to your Questions IMO

1). guiding - not needed but doesn't cause problems either with EAA

2). Mount - alt or EQ will work BUT as with any mount it should be able to carry your kit with ease as you stated.

3. Camera - Mono is better as its more sensative. But I have(still do) done DSLR EAA with Astrotoaster live stacking no problem but confess to guiding(due to using DSLR) depending on the other factors invovled - DSO brightness,Wind strength,Sky quality,kit etc

4. Scope - as fast as possible but there are many variations/combinations is use with EAA.

5. Deep pockets - its can be very expensive as with all Astro stuff - if you let it 🙂

6. Portability  - if you intend to work in the field or at remote dark sites. EAA with a small ALT Mount,Fast Wide Lens or small fast scope can give great views of the night sky.

Continue doing your research as more time finding facts and deciding if EAA meets your wishes the better IMO.

Clear Skies

 

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Like stash,, I'm old school with what I do,, but I embrace any tech that will advance video astronomy,, I did say I was old school.. 

I don't guide,, and I don't stack either these day's,, but did stack using byeos and astrotoaster,, fantastic way to it. 

Myself,, I've came a long way and found that live view is what I like,, looking at live/near live images on the laptop,, I have always been a fan of lunar images and continue to do so,, but I'm looking at narrow band video astronomy this year,, how will it pan out,, no idea,, but the great thing about video astronomy is we can find out very quickly if it doesn't work due to our short exposures, 

Video astronomy has progressed a long way since I got into it back in 2011, the folk who know me are aware of how passionate I am in promoting it,, but I move with the times and not stuck in the analogue years,

as stash says,, equipment wise,, astrophotography and video astronomy use much the same kit now and it's down to what technique is used,,

me I do it my way,, and it's a hobby we do it to relax ( ha ha) and be happy,, do what makes you feel happy doing it,, 

We've always been shepards and not sheep,, we're round pegs in square holes. 

Davy 

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Thanks for all your responses - very helpful.

I'll be back with more questions, I'm sure !

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