Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

sgl_imaging_challenge_banner_through_the-_eyepiece_winners.thumb.jpg.236833c5815bb321211a43f4d5214ba8.jpg

M16

The next step(s)

Recommended Posts

Hi all!

I am plotting out the next set of purchases, err, milestones :) in my growing hobby and looking to get some advice.  First will be what I've got currently, then I'll follow with the different things I'm thinking to do next.  Let me know, please, what you all think should be the priority for me.  Generally speaking, looking to increase the mag for closer Jupiter and moon viewing. As FYI, massive light pollution zone.

Current gear:
Scope: 1250mm f4.92 AD10 

EPs included:
Eyepiece 1: 2", Superview 30mm 68° 

Eyepiece 2: 1.25", Super-Plossl 9mm 52° 

So far purchased:
Eyepiece 3: ES 18mm 82°
Eyepiece 4: ES 9mm 100°

Turns out I love a big FOV.  

My thoughts on future purchases in the pipeline for the scope are the following.  I need a new moon filter.  The one included in the kit is a 1.25 inch, and I basically retired the 9mm that came with the kit for the ES 100 Deg upgrade.  For the filter, I am considering the following:
1. Baader Planetarium Moon and Skyglow Filter - 2" FMS-2

For magnification, thinking of the following possible solutions
2. Tele Vue 3 to 6mm Nagler 1.25" Zoom Eyepiece 
3. Explore Scientific 82° 4.7mm Eyepiece
4. Explore Scientific 5.5 mm 100° 
5. Tele Vue 2.0x - 2" Powermate 
6. Explore Scientific 2" 3x Focal Extender 

Lastly, wondering about a further improvement to image quality using a paracorr
7. Tele Vue Visual Imaging Paracorr Type-2

On the magnification front, I've done my simple math of 1250/18, 1250/9 then *2 or *3 to give me different mag levels.  Thoughts please!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Depends on budget really - I think holding on just a bit longer to see what people make of ES82 LER (new series, or improved 82 range, not quite sure) would be a good idea.

With mine F/6 8" (almost the same FL), I would happy with those 3 eyepieces and decent x2 barlow (because I've already got ES82 11mm). Well, come to think of it, a bit more than decent barlow - would love to get myself Baader VIP barlow (for visual and other applications).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Worth remembering that the 3-6 Nagler zoom is a 50 degree eyepiece not a wide or ultra wide design. Very fine high power eyepiece though.

If you want wide field and high power think along the lines of a Powermate / Focal Extender / TeleXtender used with the 82 or 100 degree eyepieces.

Give these decisions lots of thought and research though - you could well be spending more than the scope has cost on these accessories and there are lots of good options at those price levels.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just one more point about the Nagler Zoom...... it delivers excellent high power views of the Lunar surface 😀 it is also very compact.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a moon filter and I think it came out of the box precisely once - to try it and show it didn't need it. Do you find the moon uncomfortably bright?

If you go for the 3* that gives you 6mm & 3mm, so if you got a 12-13mm that would give you about 4.5 and a nice spread - maybe a better length than 3mm except on those exceptional evenings.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Pig said:

Just one more point about the Nagler Zoom...... it delivers excellent high power views of the Lunar surface 😀 it is also very compact.

Agreed - and a Powermate / Telextender plus ultra / hyperwide eyepiece combo really isn't !

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got hold of a variable polarising filter for moon viewing. Can make things much more comfortable with just a quick twist to alter phase to phase.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The best filter for the moon and Jupiter is neodymium so stick with your choice. 

However, I think that binoviewers are the best option for lunar and planetary which means pairs of narrower FoV eyepieces. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 08/02/2019 at 14:49, M16 said:

3. Explore Scientific 82° 4.7mm Eyepiece
4. Explore Scientific 5.5 mm 100°

A bit too close together for my taste.  They might both be 5mm with the decimal points being merely marketing differentiation.

I'd probably get the 5mm APM XWA 110° instead for a lot less money than the ES-100 and 10 extra degrees AFOV.  Many folks on CN and SGL have found the APM XWA line to be better than the ES-100 line and very close to the Ethos line.

On 08/02/2019 at 14:49, M16 said:

Lastly, wondering about a further improvement to image quality using a paracorr
7. Tele Vue Visual Imaging Paracorr Type-2

I'd start with a much less expensive GSO/Revelation coma corrector to see if you notice the effects of coma at f/5.  I find mine works plenty well to remove 90%+ of the coma at F/6.  It should work nearly as well at f/5 for you.  It also has the advantage over the Paracorr in that it only magnifies by 10% instead of 15%.  You do need to add a 20mm or so spacer between the eyepiece holder and the optics section.  Separation isn't adjustable, so parfocalizing your eyepieces becomes important.  I've also found it handy for reaching focus with a DSLR in a Dob when using just the optics section.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Really appreciate the feedback so far.  Thank you.  A couple of clarifying points and replies, summed up:

1.  I am well aware that the EP collection is rivaling the price of the scope.  If the EPs are transferable to the second scope I eventually get, a MCT or SCT, then I think the investment is worth while.  The second scope will be when I finally dig into AP.  I promised my wife I'd wait (nearly) a year before doing that though :)

2. Filter - I have very light sensitive eyes.  Extremely so, per my ophthalmologist.  The moon at half full hurts my eyes when viewed through the scope at even 40x, when full it makes me reel back with blinding effect.  I have to get a 2" filter otherwise my favorite EPs can't be used for lunar observation.  Thank you for the confirmation on the filter, Ricochet, Unklewhale.

3. Louis D, I meant the 2 EPs as an either/or scenario, main difference as FOV.  Appreciate the recommendation on the APM XWA 5 mm 110° x-treme Wideangle Eyepiece.  So far I've only really considered the ES and TV EPs, I will have to check on the reviews for the APM.  Both this site and on CN, the ES 100 and Ethos get similar reviews, with TV at a slight advantage.  With a $200 higher price for the slight I went with the ES line overall.  Open to admitting it might be a mistake in the long run and would love to be schooled if that is the case.

4.  Binoviewers.  With binoviewing, I'd need to purchase 2 of each EP that is used, correct?  This can be a dangerous proposition at this time :D

5. Compact EPs.  I get that the wide FOV plus extender is some real weight on the scope.  This is a driving factor to consider the Nagler zoom.    I figure I can always just adjust the balance on the dob and/or look into trying the speaker magnet as some other posters have recommended as counter weight.

6.  Powermate 2x/Focal Extender 3x - with the 18mm and 9mm EPs (not counting the included 9mm & 30mm), 2x really only gets me the effective 4.5mm @ 277x.  The 3x extender would effectively add 6mm 208x and 3mm 416x.  Again though, its a lot of glass to look through and work with on the scope!  Kind of why I am leaning towards slowly adding individual EPs for each mag I'd like at my disposal.

Looking forward to any and all replies!  Thank you

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, M16 said:

Binoviewers.  With binoviewing, I'd need to purchase 2 of each EP that is used, correct?  This can be a dangerous proposition at this time :D

Yes, you need two but they may be cheaper than a single wide apparent field eyepiece, depending on what you go for. Also, using two eyes means that you don't get the same blinding effect when viewing the moon. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, M16 said:

I am well aware that the EP collection is rivaling the price of the scope.

I just did a quick summation of the value of my eyepieces' new values adjusted for current prices (or inflation adjusted for discontinued eyepieces), and it comes out somewhat north of $7500.  This is in the ballpark of the combined value of my telescopes as well.  Of course, spread out over 22 years of observing, that works out to an average outlay of about $700/year, so not so onerous.

6 hours ago, M16 said:

Binoviewers.  With binoviewing, I'd need to purchase 2 of each EP that is used, correct?  This can be a dangerous proposition at this time :D

Cheaper, narrower field eyepieces actually work better for many folks in binoviewers.  First, many folks can't fit their nose between wide eyepieces.  Second, a barlow may be needed to reach focus extending the focal ratio, decreasing the demand on the eyepiece design.  Third, you can't really look directly at the edge without losing one of the eyepiece views, so edge performance isn't such a big deal.  Fourth, 60 degree fields feel like 70 degree fields in monovision because both eyes are in on the action.

6 hours ago, M16 said:

I will have to check on the reviews for the APM.

Here's one CN thread directly comparing the APM to other 100 degree eyepieces.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.