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Spectacles for stargazing

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My day to day specs are varifocal, photochromatic and plastic lensed. They have some astigmatism looking at stars due to the varifocal design.

So I really need a distance single focal clear lens pair. They must have largish lenses, lightish weight, have an anti-reflection coating and be scratch resistant on the outer surface as well as small field curvature. ūüė•

So can anyone recommend the lens material which would be best suited to all the above please?

 

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I have never had any problems with quality plastic lenses. My (Zeiss) varifocals don't seem to produce astigmatism, but there is a gradient of focus over the field of view (a curious field curvature, if you like, so I often don my computer glasses (also Zeiss), which have a uniform correction for a distance of about 1m. I do have to swap around glasses to see in the distance, so I might get some uniformly corrected lenses put into an old frame.

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I have varifocal glasses, but also prism and astigmatism, so asked my optician for a pair of distance glasses to the long end of my prescription.

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I bought a pair of basic distance-only glasses from eyebuydirect for under $20 shipped.  The basic plastic lens has the lowest index of refraction short of glass, so it adds the least off axis chromatic aberrations to images.  I've not had issues with scratching, but I've also become cognizant of pushing in too far after scratching expensive polycarbonate lenses in the past.

One upside to a dedicated pair of glasses is that they don't accumulate microscratches from daily wear and cleaning, so there's very little scatter or flaring caused by them in use.  I keep them in a case in my astro toolbox of miscellaneous bits and pieces.

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I've worn glasses since I was four, they great at sorting out my really bad eyes, to the point that with them I have 20/20 vision.  In addition they sort out the stigmatism that I have (everyone has one apparently).   When working at the scope, I'll tend use my glasses if I need to be sure that the focus is correct for other people.  But if I'm working alone, I'll tend to remove my glasses.   The stigmatism isn't that bad for me, so removing the glasses completely means that I don't have to worry about eye relief and things like that.

Just wanted to point out the obvious that rather than getting more lenses, you might want to try simply removing the glasses from the equation.   (if not for you, then maybe this is useful for someone else reading the thread later)

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