Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

sgl_2019_sp_banner.thumb.jpg.a0ff260c05b90dead5c594e9b4ee9fd0.jpg

Sam

Members
  • Content Count

    7,374
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

384 Excellent

About Sam

  • Rank
    Human

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    www.milky-way.kiwi

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    New Zealand
  1. I made these two movies on how to find Omega Centauri and Eta Carinae Nebula in the Southern Sky. This was on the back of a great night two nights ago where the conditions were pretty good and got views of both of them. Though Omega Centauri was quite low on the horizon so would have been a lot better if I waited a few hours. Eta Carinae Nebula was just fantastic, it’s a huge object and the nebula extends a long way from the central bit. How to find Omega Centauri How to find Eta Carinae Nebula
  2. Yep, we should be able to see it here, as long as it’s not cloudy...
  3. The Electron is supposed to launch today, it was delayed from December - launch window is in 5 hours.
  4. Sam

    PST got!

    You are going to get a lot of enjoyment from your PST, they’re a great telescope and the Sun is fantastic to look at.
  5. Hi, The link below is for the night sky next week, in the Southern Hemisphere. Because the Moon will be up, it focuses on the Moon, Jupiter, Mars and a few clusters. The night sky for 22-28 January 2018
  6. My most memorable moment would be seeing Saturn for the first time, I’ll never forget how awesome it looked, just hanging there in the eyepiece.
  7. Hi, if any one wants to know what’s going on in the Southern Sky next week, have a look at this link: Night Sky 15-21 January 2018 The bit about the planets should be fairly similar to what you’ll see in the Northern sky so that might be helpful. Sam
  8. Great questions, I did an update with the “how far away are things” question: How far can we see?
  9. That is amazing, I can’t believe how awesome that is. I was amazed by the NASA animation around the pulsar a few years ago but this takes it to whole new level. Wow! Thanks for sharing the link.
  10. Sam

    Hello folks

    Welcome to SGL Paul.
  11. Oh yeah, that is a fairly common question, and true, not an easy one to answer.
  12. I do a fair bit of community outreach for astronomy and have found a bunch of common themes in questions that people ask, so me and my colleague, who gets asked similar questions, wrote a blog post about. Six common questions to ask an astronomer. It’d be interesting to hear what others get asked when people find out you’re into astronomy.
  13. Sam

    Hello from Cumbria

    Welcome to SGL Mark!
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.