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My first Jupiter (disater)


Richard C
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First decent night viewing since Christmas - so used the opportunity to have a look at Jupiter for the first time and then took this photo...

Any tips for astrophotography taken with a point and click pointing into the eyepiece? Or is is time to get a decent DSLR?

Added: I know I've got a typo in the thread title.

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Edited by Richard C
Smelling pistake...
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I started with point and click afocal imaging like you. The best way to do it is with a remote switch and an afocal adaptor like this one: Adaptors - Skywatcher Universal Camera Adapter

Even with this kit though lining up the camera with the eyepiece is really tricky and you'll never get great results or bring out any fine detail, only vague smudges of cloud bands. You'll want to set your camera to auto and surprisingly I found keeping the flash on brought out surface details, but the best afocal pic of jupiter I ever got was this one, which still shows only a fraction of the detail I've since achieved with webcam imaging. Webcam/planetary imaging cameras really is the best way to do it.

Good luck!

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Cheers for the info Jupiterholic. I was using a camera adapter at the time, but judging by your flash comments I just need to play with the settings a little more.

Also I'm impressed with the above results you did achieve. It's nice to know that there is hope for pointy click after all.

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  • 2 weeks later...
...You'll want to set your camera to auto and surprisingly I found keeping the flash on brought out surface details...

I see what you mean about keeping the flash on - this was an accident last night with the moon, phone camera straight down the eyepiece.

I have no idea why this happened...

Only post processing was cropping and resizing in PS.

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I see what you mean about keeping the flash on - this was an accident last night with the moon, phone camera straight down the eyepiece.

I have no idea why this happened...

Only post processing was cropping and resizing in PS.

You've got your camera just a little too far back from the eyepiece there I think, you need to get it as flush with it as possible. Here's a few of my best afocal moons that happened when i had a really tight space between camera lens and eyepiece. To be honest its been a while since I took these and have forgotten whether I used the flash or not, I think I did but I'd experiment with it if I were you. Just make sure your camera is really butting against the eyepiece and the rubber eyepiece ring is blocking stray light from around the camera lens.

The moon is just the best target for afocal photography. It does wonders for your confidence. You have the makings of a great pic there underneath the flash reflection. Good luck with your next go!

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Edited by Jupiterholic
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I use an adapter for my little lumix. You have to keep practising. My Jupiter shots have the moons but no cloud detail but at a max exposure of 1 second I don't expect much!

My attempts are on my blog (address on auto signature) but all i can say is don't buy a dslr just yet. The pictures given as examples above are evidence that with patience and the right conditions you can get great shots.

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  • 4 weeks later...
I started with point and click afocal imaging like you. The best way to do it is with a remote switch and an afocal adaptor like this one: Adaptors - Skywatcher Universal Camera Adapter

Even with this kit though lining up the camera with the eyepiece is really tricky and you'll never get great results or bring out any fine detail, only vague smudges of cloud bands. You'll want to set your camera to auto and surprisingly I found keeping the flash on brought out surface details, but the best afocal pic of jupiter I ever got was this one, which still shows only a fraction of the detail I've since achieved with webcam imaging. Webcam/planetary imaging cameras really is the best way to do it.

Good luck!

Hmmm, the camera flash might have helped (I'm guessing here!) because the camera automatically lowered the shutter speed to allow for the flash, the flash then went off into your garden and the result was a shorter exposure of Jupiter!

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