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Finger Prints on Corrector and Eps


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Hi all,

So I am the happy new owner of a second hand 6SE (sorry about the clouds for the next few days/weeks, its all my fault), but I have noticed some finger prints on the corrector and some of the eye pieces.

I know you aren't meant to clean these normally, but what advice would you give if I need to?

They aren't major, but it would be good to know how to go about it, if its affecting things.

Thanks

C

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For lenses (and the corrector is a lens of sorts) I use the Baader Wonder Fluid and their micro fibre cloth. Before applying this I use a bulb type puffer to blow as much dust and debris off the lens surface as possible.

This approach has worked for me on SCT correctors, refractor objectives and eyepiece lenses. A supply of the fluid lasts quite a time:

https://www.firstlightoptics.com/astronomy-optics-cleaning-protection/baader-optical-wonder-fluid.html

Its important to follow the instructions given with the above and it's not suitable for mirrors.

 

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No, it is not a no go, but apply very little to no pressure!! Blow and brush off (with a camera brush) the surfaces before you touch them with fluid or clothes.
Do not spray the fluid on your lenses, but wet the cloth a bit with it.

Instead of the Baader fluid, propyl alcohol will work too. Do not use any detergent, cause that will leave a haze

Waldemar

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Here's a trick I learned for cleaning lenses in the field when you only have a microfiber cloth available.  Hold the dirty lens above your open mouth and slowly huff upwardly onto it to put a little condensation on the lens, then carefully wipe it with the cloth.  Using this technique, you minimize the chance of spitting on your lens.  Of course, you still need to lightly blow or brush it clean first to remove any grit that could scratch it during wiping.  I haven't scratched a camera lens or eyepiece in 30+ years using this technique.

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