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stevepeverall

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About stevepeverall

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  1. The AZ4 can be picked up with one hand and thrown into a boot of a car and can handle 5-6Kg scope no problem The Skytee can be lugged out into the gaarden with 2 hands, can handle up to a 15kg scope and is a very stable mount.
  2. Looks like you're more qualified than most to answer your own question! Have to agree with the above posts that recommend a good quality 100 - 120mm frac. It will get used the most because it is the most convenient.
  3. That's a really good looking set up you have there. Beautiful.
  4. I had a similar dilemma a year or so ago and decided to go for from a 110ED to a Mak 180. I loved the extra light grasp, observing from a suburban area in the midlands with reasonably dark skies (you could see the milky way unaided on some nights). The thing was I loved the extra light grasp but missed the pinpoint stars of the refractor so I sold the Mak and went for a APM 140ED. That would have been great if I hadn't moved to London. With the light polluted skies there's not a huge amount of difference between a 110 and 140. The biggest difference is portability. The 110 is as grab and go frac on a an AZ mount, easily taken to somewhere dark. The 140 is much larger on a beefier mount and stays indoors (I don't have a garden at the moment). In the long term when I move back out of London and have a garden the 140 will come into it's own but if your living in London and intend to travel with your scope to darker skies, portability is an issue. PS. I wouldn't worry about CA if you're just using it visually. I see none.
  5. Thanks for posting this. I was feeling guilty about owning three fracs until now. The Ikharus 102 is a good looking scope. The 80mm version was my first scope.
  6. Hi Perky Welcome to SGL. I go camping down in the New Forest several times every summer and stay at a place call Roundhill Campsite about a mile east of Brockenhurst. It's not the cheapest campsite but there's a wide open space with no light pollution and no one bothers you. I always have my travel scope handy in the back of the camper.
  7. For my somewhat cheaper APM 140 F/7, I remained consistently mean and bought a cheap but fully functional case for around £60. Trifibre sell these as drum cases. The shop link for the case I bought is here: https://store.trifibre.co.uk/drum-hardware-case-39x12x12.html, but at the time of writing the site has a bad certificate so you may have a problem with the link. The main site entry is here: http://www.trifibre.co.uk/index/. Here's another option for about £75. They sell handles as accessories. Thon Accessory Case 105x30x28 BK http://www.thomann.de/gb/thon_zubehoercase_105_32_28_schwarz.htm
  8. Thanks Knight of Clear Skies. This has just gone on my summer reading list.
  9. This documentary gets shown once or twice a year on BBC 4 under the title "The 2000 year old supercomputer" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BoS75-0BRWo I've seen it a few times and it's well worth a view.
  10. I've been through exactly the same thought process Chris. The TEC was just a little more than I was willing to spend and for visual only the APM ticked all the boxes. Apparently they've been very popular and the company making the lens cells have run out of glass hence mine will arrive around the end of February.
  11. Had my first ever view of Jupiter's Great Red Spot with this scope. Detail on the moon was mind blowing and great on smaller star clusters. I bought a black camping mat as a cheaper alternative to dew shield and haven't experienced any problems with dew.
  12. I noticed this too. Seems a little expensive SH though considering the price new. http://www.telescopehouse.com/acatalog/TeleVue_Radians.html
  13. I bought a second hand Mak180 on the back of Dave Armeson waxing lyrical about one earlier in the year. http://stargazerslounge.com/topic/216208-skywatcher-180-mak-or-celestron-c8-sct/?hl=%2Bmak+%2B180+%2Bvs+%2Bc8#entry2323270 Before, using small refractors, globular clusters were just tiny smudges which faded on magnification. Now hundreds of of stars are visible in in them at x193 magnification. This blows me away everytime I look at them now!
  14. It doesn't make any difference. Purging eyepieces with a an anhydrous gas simply removes moisture from the inside of the EP and prevents them from fogging up in cold conditions (which let's face it doesn't happen even with eyepieces that haven't been purged). As a chemist purging stored chemicals or doing moisture sensitive reactions under argon has a slight advantage over nitrogen because argon is heavier than air and forms a moisture free layer over the chemicals. With an EP which can potentially leak the gas from the top or the bottom over time regardless of the fact that the seals are watertight means that there is no difference between the two gases. Personally I think that eyepiece purging is a gimmick which offers no real benefits.
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