Jump to content

740427863_Terminatorchallenge.jpg.2f4cb93182b2ce715fac5aa75b0503c8.jpg

Solar activity?


TheThing
 Share

Recommended Posts

As I understand it, we're coming towards the end of the Maunder (sp?) Minimum for solar activity, or it's end is possibly a little over due?

Could this be the reason that we've had pretty bitter winters the last two years or is it just a coincidence?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I do think the scare mongers such as global warmers and tree huggers do tend to forget these little events sometimes :)

We still not had as bad as the 1947 winter yet.......

yeah i know, stacks of evidence to support global warming and not taking into account individual events in time, but rather a series or events over years... But that is boring :)

Edited by Catanonia
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I do think the scare mongers such as global warmers and tree huggers do tend to forget these little events sometimes :)

We still not had as bad as the 1947 winter yet.......

yeah i know, stacks of evidence to support global warming and not taking into account individual events in time, but rather a series or events over years... But that is boring :)

Eeeeaaasy!!! That's hinting at a topic that seems to 'ignite' fury on 'some' Astro Forae!?!

I think there seems to be evidence in the sunspot activity of recent months and the lengths of blank periods... that we are 'out of the trough' and maybe... just on the way out of solar minimum, but who knows???

it will be interesting to see what happens over the next few years considering that much of the technology and techniques (beyond visual observing records) is younger than one solar cycle....

i just hope we are on the way out as, while not interested in solar astronomy (beyond eclipses/transits), the investment is just too great...

I need a boost from a genuinely good auroral display.

Steve

Edited by skye at night
Link to comment
Share on other sites

As I understand it, we're coming towards the end of the Maunder (sp?) Minimum for solar activity, or it's end is possibly a little over due?

The Maunder minimum lasted from 1645 to 1715. So actually we have been out of it for 295 years.:):eek::)

Please don't ask if one weeks cold weather is a result of solar activity, the sun doesn't operate on weekly cycles, 10,000 years cycles maybe but not weekly. More likely to be something called "Weather".

Edited by Capricorn
Link to comment
Share on other sites

the sun doesn't operate on weekly cycles, 10,000 years cycles maybe but not weekly. More likely to be something called "Weather".

Please feel free to correct me if i am wrong here but doesn't the sun have an 11 year cycle give or take the odd extended period of activity/inactivity? :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You're right, Jamie. :) Every 11 years the Sun flips its magnetic field, marking the peak of the maximum. With Feb 2001 marking the peak of Cycle 23, the peak of Cycle 24 is supposed to occur in 2012 but it doesn't look like it's going to happen.

If anyone would like to do some independent research, look into Sir William Herschel 's sunspot studies -vs- the price of grain in London. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As i understand it.

The Sun had a Grand Maximum in 1985 and the trend in activity has been downwards ever since.

If the theory is right then we could be heading for a new Maunder Minimum and looking at the Sun in white light will be quite boring.... :)

Cheers

Ian

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.