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Skywatcher 70!


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Just bought a  cheap beginners telescope it's all set up see the creators. In the moon but not four any planets only Mars but tried using different lens with the Barlow n all I get is a marble shape object. Like if you look at the sun when it's hazy n don't hurt your eyes  will I be able to see Saturn or Jupiter. With this telescope. Thanks adidaz 29

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Jupiter yes, 60x should manage Jupiter, Saturn really needs over 100x around 120x is what I saw it nicely at and that is pushing your luck. Save yourself the trouble and forget Mars. Mars is always small and a lot of magnification is required for it, and a lot of luck.

I am not great on barlows, prefer single eyepieces. 60x should be easy on the scope try a 15mm eyepiece, 900/15 = 60x. If you want then try a 12mm, 900/12 = 75x. Problem is that Jupiter and Saturn are too low to see anythin of detail. Just too much murky atmosphere in the way. For Saturn you will need something like an 8mm eyepiece for 112x. To me this is likely to be at maybe beyond what the scope can deliver.

You will also find that the supplied eyepieces are not particularily good. SW are not going to supply £100 eyepiece for free on a £100 scope. Plossl eyepieces should be OK on the scope. You can get them for around the £25 area. Check for used ones, think there may be a couple on here or on ABSUK.

Standard advice: Download and install Stellarium. Then set your locatioon. Next press F4 and set the DSO magnitude to 6 and apply. All the faint DSO's will disappear what remains the SW70 should see. M13 in Hercules is presently easy, M92 (a bit above and left) is also possible. M31 Andromeda is too big to fit in the view = use binoculars. Split a few double stars - Almaak, Albireo and Mizar.

P.S. Is the 70 the one on the Orange and Black mount ?

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I've got a 70mm refractor that I use occasional just as a very quick grab and go scope. Got it for £50 just over a year ago, and to be honest just bought it for the az3 stand thaT went with it. Was surprised how good the scope was when I got it for the price. Surprising what you can see with just a humble sized scope. Jupiter and Saturn will be easy to see. Mars yes, but will be small. Plenty of globular and open clusters you should be able to see, along with M31 and M42 etc depending on skies and light pollution. 

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When I started out around 1972, by far the most common telescopes that people had were the 60mm F/15 Achromatic-Refractor. So at 70mm, you've got a more capable telescope than most people had back then - though I managed to get myself a 3" (75mm) F/15 refractor.

You'll be able to get a very nice view of Saturn and Jupiter. Mars will always be a small, orange-red disk - even in much larger instruments. It's a small planet. And you'll be able to see many impressive sights with your scope. If you haven't downloaded Stellarium yet, you may wish to do so as Stellarium will help you learn the nighttime sky and all the treasures it contains. Please do let us know if you'd like to learn more about this wonderful software-program, which is absolutely free. One of the greatest bargains for us astronomy lovers!

Oh, and welcome to SGL, it's nice of you to join us!

Clear & dark skies,

Dave

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10 hours ago, Dave In Vermont said:

When I started out around 1972, by far the most common telescopes that people had were the 60mm F/15 Achromatic-Refractor. So at 70mm, you've got a more capable telescope than most people had back then - though I managed to get myself a 3" (75mm) F/15 refractor.

You'll be able to get a very nice view of Saturn and Jupiter. Mars will always be a small, orange-red disk - even in much larger instruments. It's a small planet. And you'll be able to see many impressive sights with your scope. If you haven't downloaded Stellarium yet, you may wish to do so as Stellarium will help you learn the nighttime sky and all the treasures it contains. Please do let us know if you'd like to learn more about this wonderful software-program, which is absolutely free. One of the greatest bargains for us astronomy lovers!

Oh, and welcome to SGL, it's nice of you to join us!

Clear & dark skies,

Dave

Thanks Dave

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