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graemlourens

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About graemlourens

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    Proto Star

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Interests
    AP
  • Location
    Warsaw
  1. @Rodd Help me if i missed that somewhere: Whats the designation of this target? Great picture.... very nice colours! You did a great job.
  2. A surprisingly happy update: After several days of careful drying of all components it seems that everything is working as it should! I must have been extremely lucky with the direction the telescope and the shutter were pointing and the rain must have not gone straight into the devices but more 'over' them and the water did not penetrate deep into USB Hubs, Cameras etc. I'll only really see if there are no hidden damages when i do the next real imaging. I was lucky that the past few days we have had extremely hot weather and the humidity in the observatory was around 40% even without a dehumidifier, i suspect this made a huge difference that the water evaporated very rapidly without me having to take everything apart. Looking into the lense and down to the filter wheel and camera i could not see any stains or residue of water. Currently i'm in the process to analyse this mechanical shutter error once and for all with ScopeDome company as i have totally lost the trust in the dome. Hope we get that settled before the nebula season starts again! Thank you for all your kind words & support. Kind regards, Graem
  3. Thank you all very much for your kind words & feedback! I will tomorrow assess the situation and see what are the next steps. Will post you how hard this rainfall hit the equipment. In the shock i forgot to make some pictures. Looks very strange seeing a telescope with a puddle of water infront of the lense Hopefully something many of you never have to see. Kind regards, Graem
  4. Hi everybody. I have to share a sad story. For around 4 years now i have been successfully remotely imaging with the scopedome 3M observatory. Great piece of equipment. It always had one bug though that sometimes with high temperatures the shutter would not open (we thought temperature was the reason). The control hardware needed a restart and then it worked. Together with the ScopeDome guys though we never found the issue and i rather got to live with it. I wrote software that would detect this problem and do a mechanical reboot that then 100% solved the issues. Yesterday while starting imaging a very unexpected cloud arrived and it immediately started pouring rain. The AAG System did its job and told the shutter to close. But it did not... At the time i was 70km away from the observatory, and tried via remote access to do the usual fixes one learns after so many years of operating these kind of devices. Nothing worked. Very unusual! I had to watch my observatory be rained into while i was driving 45 minutes to go and save what was saveable. The irony - when i arrived at the observatory everything was soaking wet, but i had beautiful crispy clear sky again. Just seriously one fat cloud passed... It took me a while to fix the issue, turns out that just rotating the observatory a few degrees did the trick, and the shutter was reacting again. I'll be investigating this further with the ScopeDome people. Now to the reason i am turning to you guys & gals here: Does anyone have experience with how to handle equipment that got a pretty decent amount of rain? My approach was to leave the dehumidifier going the whole night and i didn't touch anything, didn't move anything or unplug. My gut feeling tells me to not move around the water more than it already has, and let evaporation do as little harm as possible. (Obviously i turned off all electronics, except the dehumidifier) Any insight or hard lessons learnt from you would help me rescue whats left. Tomorrow i am going to to the observatory again to see the process of drying, and then one by one turn on all electronics, to see what survived the unintentional cleaning session. A very painful thing to endure! Kind regards, Graem
  5. Thank you for the high praise! It is indeed very satisfying to get this kind of feedback. After a many years of doing this, some things get normal and nothing special anymore. It does give back the joy to see how certain images can get such positive feedback. Kind regards, Graem
  6. Oh my, what a flood of responses! I'm overwhelmed! Not used to so much feedback! Thank you very much for your kind words, very motivating. I'm feeling a little pucky from trying, i guess i need those magic 3d glasses ? I'm proud to have never upgraded, even if i have been tempted many times before! It does have its limits though.... I'm in a pretty sexy spot on my piece of land. 0.64 on the lightpollution map VIIRS 2018 (light blue). Its getting worse and worse as major cities in poland are expanding fast, but i guess i've got another 5-10 years until it gets unuseable! I did experiment with drizzling, but for it to work in long exposure, based on my research & trial, you need to have pretty good seeing. If seeing is your limiting factor, then drizzling will not get you very much further. But please correct me if i'm wrong! Drizzling even with video astrophotography (moon) did not make huge improvements in my case, as again, seeing was my limiting factor. Thank you again all for your kind words! A nice surprise! Kind regards, Graem
  7. Hi everybody. I always thought i could do a little better with M51, especially that it is one of the most interesting galaxies for a rather wide angle scope like my ED80 (next to andromeda obviously). I continuously added data, and finally got to processing. It was a joy to pull out so much more detail, not only due to more signal, but also improved processing skills over the years. Side by side for comparison (all data from 100% same setup). Left is approx 12h, right is approx 19h exposure. And here the final image (as usual it gets pretty bright when posting here, due to colour profiles). Stars are horrendous but thats another topic... Hope you like it! Kind regards, Graem
  8. Great capture! Andromeda is a very rewarding target! It was one of my first, and also the first time i got stuck with the car in the field at 1am in the morning I'm sure that if you add the calibration frames and maybe a little more exposure time, you'll also get rid of most of the noise, and also the colour blotching in the background. Congrats! Kind regards, Graem
  9. A phenomenal image Rodd. Nowadays not much impresses me anymore, this one did! Kind regards, Graem
  10. Hi Carole, thank you for your nice Feedback! OIII is a nightmare indeed. Going the tone mapping approach was the only way i could get anything useful from the data, but removing OIII halos were a painful manual process due to my inferior equipment. But i don't regret it! Kind regards, Graem
  11. Hey David, thank you for your kind words! The only thing i do is add it on flickr in some groups and on astrobin, if it gets picked up there sometime somehow, i'll not say no Kind regards, Graem
  12. Thank you very much Olly! I really was trying to get it as natural as possible, nice to see that i've not gone too far off. This is also due to your help in May 2017, it took me a while to experiment with all the different possibilities of getting the most efficient and pleasant to work route (not sure if you remember you helped me on this one!) I wasn't too happy with it then, so let it rest for a year or so to brew along
  13. Thank you very much, Gorann! Your feedback concerning the signature is valued, thank you! In the Print-Versions (not published) it is way smaller, but in the Web Versions, as its displayed rather small, i try to keep it at a certain size, so its still readable, and i try always to position it in a way that its not in an interesting part of the image and 'shouldn't' disturb. I'll take it into consideration though in future placements & size decisions! Kind regards, Graem
  14. Wow guys you're making me blush! I didn't expect such positive reactions. You've made me a very nice Christmas present! Kind regards, Graem
  15. I was at exactly the same point not too long ago. It felt wrong to mix 2 softwares, but the possibilities when it comes to layers, masks, clipping masks etc Photoshop (at least for me) wins by lengths. THere is no comparison. But i love PI for the mathematical aspects and also Noise Reduction / HDRCombination / Mosaic merging, where Photoshop doesn't have the same capabilities. I'd highly advise you to give Photoshop a chance and read into it (astro-tutorials, or also here on the forum) to then make your own opinion. My biggest problem to date was 'where is the 'MASTER' history, as when you're switching between softwares, its still nice to be able to keep the history. I've not figured that one out quite yet though. Lightroom i love, but not for Astro. I've also not seen too many people use Lightroom for that usecase. Lightroom for me is more for simpler adjustment tasks & cataloging, i've never seen layers or masks in the context you'd use them for astro-image-processing. Kind regards, Graem
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