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CentaurZ

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About CentaurZ

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    Nebula

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    https://www.CurtRenz.com/astronomy.html

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    Chicagoland
  1. Asteroid 1 Ceres (also dwarf planet) will appear in opposition to the Sun near the Libra-Ophiuchus border just north of Scorpius on 2019 MAY 29 at magnitude +7.0. That’s beyond naked eye visibility for most people, but it should be easily seen with binoculars. Ceres was the first asteroid to be discovered. That was by Sicilian astronomer Giuseppe Piazzi in 1801. It has a mean diameter of 945 km. Ceres is named after the Roman Goddess of Agriculture. Her statue is atop a building in which I worked for eight years, the Chicago Board of Trade where agricultural futures are traded. Photos and descriptions of Ceres would be welcome additions to this thread.
  2. Asteroid 20 Massalia will appear in opposition to the Sun near the Libra-Scorpius border on 2019 MAY 20 at magnitude +9.7. Massalia is a stony asteroid with a low inclination to the ecliptic. It was discovered in 1852 by Italian astronomer Annibale de Gasparis. Massalia has a mean diameter of 145 km. It is named after the French city of Marseille. Photos and descriptions of Massalia would be welcome additions to this thread.
  3. It’s nearly time for my monthly New Moon spotting challenge. I use the term New Moon in its classical sense of one’s first sighting of the Moon after its conjunction (Dark Moon) with the Sun. Sharp-eyed observers may want to attempt spotting the one-day-old Moon after sunset on Sunday May 5. Photos and descriptions of the young crescent Moon this month would be welcome additions to this thread.
  4. The annual Eta Aquariid Meteor Shower is already underway. It is expected to peak during the night of 2019 MAY 05-06, but for as many as three nights on either side the rate should be near the peak. Its radiant is in the constellation Aquarius. That is the direction toward which the meteor tails point, but the meteors are equally likely to appear anywhere in your sky. The Eta Aquariids are debris from the famous Comet Halley. The Eta Aquariids usually produce about sixty meteors per hour for sharp eyed observers in the southern hemisphere. Expectations are somewhat lessened for northern hemisphere observers due to Aquarius being a southern constellation. The show begins after midnight when Aquarius rises. It will continue through morning twilight. The waxing crescent Moon during the peak this year will not be a hindrance. Descriptions of the shower or perhaps even lucky photos would be welcome additions to this thread.
  5. As can be seen from the chart above, Flora will appear to pass near Beta Librae on May 16. Geocentric closest angular approach of 6.4 arcminutes will occur at 17:17 UT. Below is my more detailed chart for that event.
  6. Thanks for sharing your fine video of the occultation. Glad you got to see it live. There will be another Saturn occultation visible only from your part of the world during the evening of August 12.
  7. Asteroid 8 Flora will appear in opposition to the Sun in the constellation Libra on 2019 MAY 12 at magnitude +9.7. Flora is the innermost large asteroid. It was discovered in 1847 by John Hind in England. Flora has a mean diameter of 128 km. It is named after the ancient Roman goddess of flowers and gardens. Photos and descriptions of Flora would be welcome additions to this thread.
  8. Indeed, lit side. Thanks for the correction. It's now been edited. I had neglected to change that from words in a post for an earlier occultation. Regarding the Moon image, it is depicted in the standard manner for a geocentric observer with x-ray vision and head toward north. In some occultations the graze paths wander into both hemispheres, so I always make my graze map Moon depiction in the standard geocentric fashion. However, at my website is a page with event details for Sydney that correctly depicts the Moon as viewed from there. Sorry if my graze map Moon image creates difficulties for those of you down under. ? Meanwhile, enjoy the occultation that will be invisible to those of us up north. ?
  9. The waning gibbous Moon will occult (cover) Saturn for observers in New Zealand and eastern Australia during the night of 2019 APR 25-26 The current series of 14 monthly Saturn occultations extends from 2018 DEC 09 to 2019 NOV 29. However the large majority are not visible at nighttime from any particular location. The next series will commence on 2024 APR 06 The upcoming immersion will occur on the lunar bright limb and emersion on the dark limb. Any ocean observers on a graze path can witness the star winking on and off as lunar hills and valleys pass by. Those between the two paths will see a full occultation. Photos and descriptions of the occultation would be welcome additions to this thread. If you would like specific occultation or graze predictions for your location, please reply to this post with your longitude, latitude, elevation and time zone.
  10. The annual Lyrid Meteor Shower may already be underway. It is expected to peak during the night of 2019 APR 22-23. Its radiant is in the constellation Lyra near the bright star Vega. That is the direction toward which the meteor tails point, but the meteors are equally likely to appear anywhere in your sky. The Lyrids are debris from the long period Comet C/1861 G1 Thatcher. They have been observed for the past 2700 years, longer than any other meteor shower. The Lyrids typically present about 20 meteors per hour for sharp eyed observers, although this has varied considerably with 700 per hour seen in 1803. The show begins after Lyra rises, which is in the early evening for mid-latitude northern hemisphere observers, but much later in the southern hemisphere. It will continue through morning twilight. The waning gibbous Moon during the peak this year may provide some interference. Descriptions of the shower or perhaps even lucky photos would be welcome additions to this thread.
  11. The Lunar X may be seen by telescopic observers in much of North America during the night of 2019 APR 11-12 for an approximately four-hour period centered on APR 12 at 01:02 CDT (06:02 UT). The X should appear as the Sun rises on the clustered rims of the craters Blanchinus, La Caille and Purbach, while a waxing nearly Half Moon graces the sky. This is something to check-off from your astronomical “to-do” list. Photos and descriptions of the Lunar X would be welcome additions to this thread.
  12. It’s nearly time for my monthly New Moon spotting challenge. I use the term New Moon in its classical sense of one’s first sighting of the Moon after its conjunction (Dark Moon) with the Sun. For observers north of the tropics, being near the time of the Vernal Equinox is usually quite helpful for spotting a really young Moon. But this year the very young Moon in April will be well south of the ecliptic making it hard to detect, as made obvious in my graphic below. So most folks will need to wait for the nearly two-day-old Moon after sunset on Saturday, April 6. Photos and descriptions of the young crescent Moon this month would be welcome additions to this thread.
  13. Asteroid 2 Pallas will be in opposition to the Sun at magnitude +7.9 on 2019 APR 06. Below is my Pallas chart. Photos and descriptions of Pallas would be welcome additions to this thread.
  14. It’s nearly time for my monthly New Moon spotting challenge. I use the term New Moon in its classical sense of one’s first sighting of the Moon after its conjunction (Dark Moon) with the Sun. Some sharp-eyed folks might want to attempt spotting the one-day-old Moon after sunset on Thursday, March 7. Other observers should have better luck during the following evening. Photos and descriptions of the young crescent Moon this month would be welcome additions to this thread.
  15. Several popular science blogs are referring to the Full Moon coming during the morning of 2019 FEB 19 as not only the widest (angular measurement) so-called Super Moon in the current series of three, but also as the brightest Moon of the year. Actually the Full Moon last month was the brightest Moon since 2001 and until 2096. That peak was reached just as it left the Earth’s penumbra following a Lunar Eclipse. I calculated this with use of a Jean Meeus algorithm. For brightness, not only must nearness to the Earth be considered, but also nearness to the Sun and nearness to the anti-solar point. Other sources apparently assume that only nearness to Earth is what matters for brightness. Here are some results of my calculations:
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