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Celestron Astromaster 70AZ


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Hi

I'm fairly new to astronomy, having owned a pair of Celestron Skymaster 15x70 bins for the past couple of months, and am now ready to take the plunge with a basic scope!

I want to be able to observe solar system objects for now and learn to find my way around the night sky (before getting anything too sophisticated which would allow me to view DSO), plus budget is an issue, so I'm thinking of getting the Celestron Astromaster 70AZ refractor, which I've seen online for around £70.

I was wondering if this is the best scope for this price; I appreciate that there aren't that many scopes close to the above price, but I've seen the Skywatcher Mercury 707 (with 10mm and 25mm eyepieces), which is a similar spec and price, although the focal length is 700mm, whereas the Celestron is 900mm (with 10mm and 20mm eyepieces). However, the Skywatcher does come with a x2 Barlow lens thrown in...

Should I go for the Celestron, that gives me more focal length but would mean that I'd need to buy a separate Barlow lens, or go for the Skywatcher with a shorter focal length but with the Barlow lens thrown in??

Any advice is welcome.

Many thanks!

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Hi,

My advice would be to keep using and enjoying your 15x70 Skymasters (which are great binoculars) and keep saving for a bit longer to get a better scope. I think you would very quickly get frustrated with a 70mm refractor - your binoculars will give a better view of many objects than the scope would.

If you can get £130 or so together then you can think about a 130mm newtonian which would be a worthwile option I feel.

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Thanks for the reply.

I agree, the 15x70 Skymasters are great! :D

I've read that a refractor is better for viewing planets - is that true, and, if so, why?

Could I expect to see any of Jupiter's cloud belts or Saturn's rings with the Celestron (given decent observing conditions, of course!)?

Thanks

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