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Persony Person

5th Gas Giant in the Solar System's distant past?

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I am interested to know the opinions of more knowledgeable people about the possibility of there being a 5th Gas Giant planet as described by the Five-Planet Nice Model and Jumping Jupiter scenario in the Solar System's distant past, which is 1 explanation into how the modern day orbits of the 8 other major planets came to be. I am also intrigued into what you think the possible fate of this planet was if you do think it existed.  Was it ejected into Interstellar Space? Could it be Planet Nine? Or was it the impactor as described by Liu et al. (2019) to explain why Jupiter has a very diffuse core? Or something else?

All the indicators point to it being ~10 Earth Masses, A Mini-Neptune, and formed within the orbits of Neptune and Saturn (At the time, Neptune formed closer to the Sun than Uranus had). It possibly was part of the Solar System for 400 million years before it's demise occurred.

The link below shows a video simulation of the 5th Gas Giant being ejected as explained by the Jumping Jupiter Scenario.

https://youtu.be/VBzS9wqM55I

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I cant answer your question but have wondered how common planetary ejections from systems are, could be an awful lot of rouge planets out there..

Alan

Edited by Alien 13

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Many systems have Hot Jupiter planets. It is likely during their migration inward, they may have ejected the already present terrestrial planets. Their rapid gaining of mass could also destabilise planets that formed further out from the Hot Jupiter. There are probably more rogue planets than stars in our Galaxy. If anything from learning from our own Solar System's formation has taught us.

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