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Skywatcher Skyliner 200P Dobsonian/250PX Dobsonian?


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Hi, I have been into astronomy for only about a year. I use star charts, naked eye and bino's but we want to get a telescope. I have spent a few months researching telescopes and many people have recommended the Skywatcher Skyliner 200P Dobsonian and the Skywatcher Skyliner 250PX Dobsonian. I really can't decide which to go for. I know that they are both big but is there a massive difference in the sizes of the two? I am also wondering if I will be able to move it in and out of the house on my own, is the 250XP much heavier than the 200? Finally, are these scopes physically easy to use, (not too heavy to turn whilst viewing around the sky and nothing that needs a strong grip?)

Thank you.

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Hi Kerry - both scopes will glide on their teflon bearings so you'll have no trouble moving it round to point. Even really big ones of 24" are dead easy to point.

You really need to see the two scopes to see if you can handle them on your own. They will come in two main parts - the base and the tube. Each is easy enough to handle. The 8" will be a bit lighter and smaller than the 10".

Mines a 12" with motors and both tube and base are about the most I want to lift individualy. Some folks attach wheels and handles to just wheel it out of a shed or conservatory into the garden.

I'd suggest a trip to a scope shop or local astro soc to get a good idea of size and weight. Hope that helps :)

Edited by brantuk
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Thanks, that's very useful. I have tried in vane to view either of these scopes, I have called dozens of stockists in my area and nobody has one, they have either all sold out or informed me that the scopes are too big to stock so will only order one if I wish to buy it. I'll have to try and find an astro society near here. It's tempting to just go for the 10" as I have the money saved but would hate to not be able to lift the thing on my own! Thanks for your help.

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Hi Kerry - both scopes will glide on their teflon bearings so you'll have no trouble moving it round to point. Even really big ones of 24" are dead easy to point.

You really need to see the two scopes to see if you can handle them on your own. They will come in two main parts - the base and the tube. Each is easy enough to handle. The 8" will be a bit lighter and smaller than the 10".

Mines a 12" with motors and both tube and base are about the most I want to lift individualy. Some folks attach wheels and handles to just wheel it out of a shed or conservatory into the garden.

I'd suggest a trip to a scope shop or local astro soc to get a good idea of size and weight. Hope that helps :)

As a newbie I also find the 12" just managable in 2 parts, the base is a bit awkard, the actuall scope is not too bad on its own, good luck in choosing.

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As Brantuk stated, the 12" is as much as you would want to handle, even in 2 parts. It's also so heavy and bulky that you have to be very careful moving it in the house. The base will easily damage door jambs and furniture and the tube, due to it's mass & relative fragility will damage itself at the slightest contact with a solid object.

Also, measure your car boot carefully. My 12" Rev only just fits diagonally into the back of my Xsara Picasso, which although it's smaller than a big Volvo, is not a particularly small car!

For observing, 8" to 12" is like night and day (though an 8" would keep you happy for years). The 12" is also more comfortable as there is less need to bend your back. A stool or chair is adviseable for the 8" as even at the zenith, you need to bend.

If you go for 12", I think the modern Rev altitude bearings are far superior to the Skywatcher and they also have the facility to slide the tube fore and aft, for balancing heavy eyepieces etc.. (The tube has to be removed from the base to set the balance though.)

EDIT: Whoops!! 250mm is 10", not 12!!!! Many of the above comments still apply though.

Edited by derekm
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