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johnfosteruk

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Posts posted by johnfosteruk


  1. 3 minutes ago, steppenwolf said:

    Great report and a lovely image that proves that there is still plenty of detail to be captured even when the Moon is nearly full

    Thanks Steve, there's so much detail. I studied so much more than my meagre notes attest, but I've always struggled to tear my eye away from the eyepiece long enough to take notes!

    • Like 2

  2. 47 minutes ago, dannybgoode said:

    Nice report. I had a similar session last night and thoroughly enjoyed it. I can see this lunar observing becoming a bit of an obsession 

     

    By the look of your report, I think it already has! 👍

    • Like 1

  3. 29 minutes ago, Alien 13 said:

    Great images, am I imagining it or does the Skymax 102 produce better Luna images of a full disk moon than any other scope, from what I have seen it certainly beats the 127mm hands down.

    Alan

    Thanks Alan, I don't know about beating the 127 but the 102 does certainly punch above it's weight!


  4. Although I've had a few quick observing sessions this year, my last proper session when it wasn't full moon was 7 months ago and I've been missing it, a lot. 

    Last night when I left the office the skies were clear, the moon looked spectacular and the forecast was clear for the whole evening, as was my diary. So I put the little Skymax 102 out to cool and after dinner I had a cracking session.  Seeing was a reasonable 8/10, the Moon was at a respectable altitude, and after spending 30 minutes doing maintenance I spent 2 hours observing.

    Lots of fun was had at the Lunar tourist spots then I grabbed the Nikon and captured some images.

    Small RGB moon, best 10% of 500 video frames

    1910172151_RGBMoon09-12-19.thumb.jpg.2cc50368fc4dbb55b444ecfd9889fa26.jpg

    Closer, 25% of 100 still frames, Mono

    137059918_MonoMoon09-12-19.thumb.jpg.5ed28a0bb0a9e0b58dea21b3734bde71.jpg

    Closer still, best 10% of 1000 video frames with the 2.5x Barlow. RGB

    290550727_RGBMoonCU209-12-19.jpg.26aa72c64ba1aa4f02dbd3539c8bc51a.jpg

    618098038_RGBMoonCU109-12-19.jpg.4def1d1d9dee9ef9afd16ced065e4986.jpg

    • Like 10

  5. Although I've had a few quick observing sessions this year, my last proper session when it wasn't full moon was 7 months ago and I've been missing it, a lot. 

    Last night when I left the office the skies were clear, the moon looked spectacular and the forecast was clear for the whole evening, as was my diary. So I put the little Skymax 102 out to cool and after dinner I had a cracking session.  Seeing was a reasonable 8/10, the Moon was at a respectable altitude, and after spending 30 minutes doing maintenance I got stuck straight in with the 13mm Hyperion, the whole disk filling the field at 100x. Aristarchus shining like a jewel, Schroter's valley clearly visible at this magnification, familiar friends along the southern terminator inviting me to look closer, I quickly switched to the 10mm giving 130x and browsed over the southern terminator. Lots of browsing around, reacquainting myself with the Lunar tourist spots followed :)

    45 minutes was consumed with Schickard and the surrounding area. The shared northern walls of Phocylides and Nasymith form a summit of sorts and cast an impressive shadow, I spent 20 minutes just making sense of that!

    On to Reiner Gamma, the peculiar swirls seeming oddly out of place then a switch to the 8mm for a closer look at Aristarchus at 162.5x (which def gave some benefit over the 10mm). On to  Schroter's valley and the Cobra's head.

    Finally, I meandered up towards the North Pole for a look around Pythagoras, Babbage, Markov. Pythagoras' central peak was poking it's head out of the blackness below and Babbage A&C added some interest to their otherwise plain looking parent crater.

    Then I switched to the Nikon and grabbed some images to finish of a very nice couple of hours.

    1322703352_MonoMoon09-12-19.thumb.jpg.41846a99f1db18fafbd6a1fea55e9f49.jpg

     

    • Like 5

  6. Just now, PhotoGav said:

    Thanks John, I’m going to take that as a ‘yes’! I look forward to comparing notes as we progress in this branch of astronomy.

    You'll probably progress further sooner than I Gav!! But yes at some point I'll have notes to compare.

    • Haha 1

  7. 12 minutes ago, PhotoGav said:

    I am investigating the whole area of spectroscopy on a budget... how ‘easy’ is it to establish a star’s spectral type by using a Star Analyser? Would I get any usable results or is this a step too far for the humble amateur astronomer?

    I've been looking into this as well Gav, as long as you can produce a reasonable curve, you can determine type and temperature. 

    I've been looking at the Star Analyser SA-100.

    • Like 1

  8. I haven't had a telescope out in anger for 4 months thanks to crazy work commitments and things going on at home, and that was only a quick session.

    Yesterday I saw the forecast for the evening, decided that although it was probably wrong (because forecasts are often wrong, in case you hadn't noticed :)) I was going to setup to observe the Harvest Moon. 

    I know it's just another full moon just like any other cycle but it's special. It's lovely to sit outside with the bins studying ejecta rays, remembering harvest festivals when I were a lad (somebody always brought a can of Campbells soup!).

    As I grabbed 200 frames to finish off the session (I stacked 20%, Pipp, AS3!, IMPPG to process) I remembered a little Longfellow -

        It is the Harvest Moon! On gilded vanes
        And roofs of villages, on woodland crests
        And their aerial neighbourhoods of nests
        Deserted, on the curtained window-panes
        Of rooms where children sleep, on country lanes
        And harvest-fields, its mystic splendor rests!
        Gone are the birds that were our summer guests,
        With the last sheaves return the labouring wains!
        All things are symbols: the external shows
        Of Nature have their image in the mind,
        As flowers and fruits and falling of the leaves;
        The song-birds leave us at the summer's close,
        Only the empty nests are left behind,
        And pipings of the quail among the sheaves.

    I've not been unhappy with my recent astronomy-less state, but I think I shall be making more of an effort to make the time now, happily work has started to ease off a little, much obliged. :)

    Mono

    1367398430_MonoMoon13-09-19.thumb.jpg.c0986e370a97fcf57c6e9e124d209bc5.jpg

    RGB

    1208262999_RGBMoon13-09-19.thumb.jpg.7a6a00e9f6bc21657ccbd65136ad5178.jpg

     

     

    • Like 7
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