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astronomer2002

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About astronomer2002

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    Nebula

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  • Location
    Maidenhead
  1. The focus motor is intended for a Meade scope so I don't know if the bolt holes on the focus mount on the Celestron will line up. See the images in first post to see how it fits over the existing manual focuser. The hand controller has a momentary on-off-on three way action so you can toggle the focuser in either direction without having to lift your thumb from the switch. I have used it and it works well in either hand. The speed of the JMI electric focuser is controlled via a small rotary wheel on the motor itself. This is the way JMI built it. It may sound odd but it is quite easy to use in practice. Ramp it up to full speed to get course focus and then reduce it for fine focusing. Ian B
  2. I am selling a JMI focus motor for Meade SCT's. It has a replacement controller as the original was lost many years ago. Works fine on a LX200. Asking £40 for complete unit and controller plus £5 if you need it posted.
  3. I was not aware of this rule. I am trying to help a friend who is suffering health issues. I am selling the items and have them in my possession. If there are issues with them I will deal with those. I hope this is not going to be an issue, it would be sad if SGL forbids helping friends in need. Ian B
  4. For sake of clarity and compliance with the rules of selling, that have just been pointed out to me, I should make it clear I am selling these items . I will pass the proceeds on to my friend, but take responsibility for the transactions and the items being sold. I am selling some astro equipment for a friend who is unable to use them any more. The big items have gone but I am left with some accessories. Here is a list and what we are looking for:- JMI Robofocus for SCT's with controller - £45 Meade Electronic Eyepiece - £20 Off axis Guider for SCT's - £30 ********* Now Sold ********** Telrad with Solar Finder and new base - £25 ********* Now Sold ********** Postage on above will be £5 each but can be amalgamated. Pickup from Maidenhead also fine. All are in working condition and have been tested. The Telrad is unusual in that it has a Solar finder with it. There is a hood to protect your eyes from the sun when using the Solar finder. The Electronic eyepiece runs off a battery and needs a TV/monitor with composite image input or a video camera. It works well when showing a group the Moon or planets. The of-axis guider has the standard T2 thread allowing many CCD cameras to be directly attached or used with an adapter with your digital SLR The JMI Robofocus is designed for Meade's and I believe it will also fit Celestrons. The controller has a 9v internal battery and is operated by a toggle switch. Fits well in teh hand using your thumb to control the motor start/stop and direction. Speed is controlled on the motor itself
  5. 3 months after I acquired the ES68 Argon filled 40mm I was offered a 41 Panoptic and so now have both. Given the lousy seeing conditions we have experienced this year it is unfair to make too strong a claim for these two eyepieces that obviously require the darkest possible sky to perform to their max however I do have some initial observations. The 41 Pan turns out to be less of a problem to use than many on astro sites suggest. I find it quite easy to position my eye in the right place and the shorter eye relief actually makes using the ep more convenient than the ES 40 since the eyecup on that ep is too short to form a good barrier against external light interference. The adjustable eyecup on the 41 Pan scores here. The stars are definitely sharper across the field in the Panoptic and the sky a little darker. I do not find the field stop particularly fuzzy with the Panoptic, which was an issue I worried about. To be honest the slightly out of focus stars at the edge of the field in the ES are more noticeable than any lack of sharpness in the field stop of the Pan. Measuring the true FOV I would have to conclude there is little to choose between them. I got the impression the ES had a very slightly larger TFOV, though this is very hard to quantify. Both eyepieces seem to suffer some vignetting when used with a 2 inch star diagonal. The outer part of the field is definitely darker in both eps. Without the star diagonal the situation improves, but is still just about noticeable. I suspect that if the sky was darker it would be hard to detect. All in all the Pan wins out for me, but not by much. I will wait for darker, clearer skies before making a final decision because both eyepieces show too bright a sky background in the current nighttime conditions. As a result the 31 Nagler continues to be my favorite low power ep. If anyone want's an ES68 40mm in pristine condition in a couple of months I expect I will be passing that one on. Ian B
  6. Since I cannot find a 41 Pan for sale s/h I purchased an ES40 as suggested by several people here. It was s/h so would be a 'bargain' if it filled the role. The skies have not been brilliant since it arrived but I have seen enough to make comparisons. Compared to the 31 Nagler I see more sky, but the outer edges are not as sharp as the Nagler. There appears to be field curvature, which isn't apparent in the Nagler 31 and is certainly more noticeable than in the Panoptic 35. The sky background also appears brighter than in the 31 Nagler or 35 Panoptic. This may be due to the sky conditions but I have read that some ES eyepieces yield a 'dark gray' background sky so it may be a real effect. Oddly my ancient 40mm Meade SWA yielded a slightly smaller field but with a darker background. I'm trying hard to like this eyepiece but it may need a Paracorr to be a perfect eyepiece, which will defeat the advantages it offers namely cost and wider true fov. I wish I knew someone with a 41 Pan so I would know whether it's the holy grail of widefield eyepieces or not. ? Ian B
  7. Scope now gone to Steve. Yes, I am sad to see it go but I can't keep storing 14 inch SCT's ? When I've recovered from this wrench maybe I'll list the 14 RCX ? Ian B
  8. No replies so I wonder about trying a different tack? Anyone fancy trading their 41 Pan plus some money for my 40mm ES 68 degree eyepiece? Ian B
  9. Looks like the scope will be going abroad - if I can find a better box to put it in for the journey. The firm offers I have had have all been from EU countries and want the scope sent to them. I wonder if anyone here has a large box they aren't going to use? I really wanted to sell it in the UK but can't hang on to it forever, there's a large hole in my bank account made by the 16 inch ACF. Ian B
  10. All the kit we buy comes in sturdy boxes, many double ones, to keep the instruments safe on their round the world journeys. This usually works fine, but then what? I am struggling to find any supplier who can provide a box suitable to pack a Meade ACF 14 to send it to potential purchasers and just wonder what we do with the originals? I rarely throw any out, just in case it's needed, but even so I can see some have mysteriously disappeared. I even found a box for a 10 inch Meade I sold on over 10 years ago. I guess all boxes end up in recycling, which is a real pain when replacements are only made 10,000 miles away. I am reminded of the saying that "you don't know what you've got 'til it's gone". Seriously, if you have a Meade 14 ACF OTA box that you are being nagged into recycling please let me know! Ian B
  11. Thankyou for posting so many pics - was the show well attended as it didn't look as busy as Astrofest? That's good for browsing but perhaps not as good for vendors. Maybe it's just the size of the venue that makes it look like there's more scopes than visitors! Looks like it was mainly visual astronomy oriented from the displays, don't see any cameras on the stands.
  12. James, They don't come up that often. I waited over a year before this one came up when I purchased it from the original buyer about 5 years ago to replace a 12inch SCT. Looks like people keep the best ones as they don't crop up very often on the s/h market. I have 'stored' it for 2 years since moving to the F8 version. As I have an old C14 this F10 was just too similar although it has a larger, flatter, field making it a better all round scope. The older C14 is basically a planetary imaging scope and the later Edge versions horrendously expensive. If you have a stalled observatory project there is nothing that galvanises the build process better than having a scope ready to install!
  13. Having moved to the F8 SCT version I have decided to sell my 14 inch Meade ACF F10 OTA. Can't really justify keeping it any longer as a 'spare'. This is just the OTA with a Losmandy plate attached, no finder or eyepieces. I used it with a Moonlite focuser, which I have repurposed, so there is just the visual back, please see the photo's. The optics are in superb condition and the tube just has a few marks on the paintwork. The first owner stuck a couple of velcro pads on the OTA for sticking accessories such as the dew heater on. The scope has always been kept in a heated observatory It is a very heavy telescope, circa 28Kg, so you will need something like an Eq8 to mount it. This really is a pick-up only, though I do have part of the original box to make transportation easier. Scope is in Maidenhead in the Thames Valley. Could arrange a part-way meet and as we often go to Devon it would be especially convenient for anyone near the M4-M5 route from the Thames Valley down to Devon. Asking £2300
  14. Sounds like the ES works for you. I am glad it does as with my f4.3 Newt I find low powers with widefield eyepieces have too large an exit pupil. There's no doubt the big Newts score when it comes to seeing faint galaxies and nebulae though. Ian B
  15. Geoff, That's an interesting story. A friend purchased an ES 82/18 and was very happy with it in a F10 12 inch SCT. I tried it in my scope and the Naglers were just so much better. I was both happy and disappointed as there was no potential saving. As a result I chose to wait for the 26 Nagler to be available s/h and continue my Nagler odyssey. I have tried other ES eyepieces but felt they weren't any better than Meades. Price performance may put ES at the top, but for pure performance there are alternatives. Ian B
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