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Oh no it isnt - Oh yes it is - Aurora Borealis - well is it?

Hawksmoor

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You could have knocked me down with a feather, when at 1.00 am. yesterday my partner said "why dont we go down to the seafront and see if we can spot the Aurora".  So off we went in the family truckster with tripod and camera box in the back.  We were originally going to set up base camp at the UK's most easterly point but the lights from the Birdseye factory were a problem. We ended up on Corton Cliffs with a fine view North towards  Great Yarmouth and the offshore wind turbines. Well after an hour we had both convinced ourselves that there was a green auroral glow hugging the horizon. I took a number of 30 second images at ISO1600 with the aim of putting together a panorama using Microsoft ICE.  Well here it is believe it or not?

The red glow is light pollution from Great Yarmouth - those 'Norfolk Boys' dont turn the lights off at midnight like us ECO warriors in Suffolk.:happy7:

We returned home for 3.00am and had some pea soup to warm up - nice.

 

Aurora Watch 081_stitch best03small.png

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There wasn't any activity last night, unfortunately. I did notice a green glow on the horizon, but I think it was centered around where the sun had just set, and not north. I would have thought it was just a cloud scattering light in a weird way.

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6 hours ago, JoeP said:

There wasn't any activity last night, unfortunately. I did notice a green glow on the horizon, but I think it was centered around where the sun had just set, and not north. I would have thought it was just a cloud scattering light in a weird way.

Real difficult to know with atmospheric stuff. The posted image was taken at about 2.00 am on 10th Sept looking NNE. so I would  have thought the sun would have been well below the horizon and much further west in September.  However, on balance both my partner and I were a bit sceptical about the 'auroral glow'. Trouble is when you want to see something you often do. :happy6:

Thanks for your comment much appreciated

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For what it's worth, I wouldn't have identified the presence of an Aurora in that photo.

What I see is some distant cumulus clouds illuminated by moonlight, some general lunar sky glow and the orangey glow on the left looks atmospheric; a thin layer of cloud illuminated from below by urban light pollution.

The Moon is quite bright as it's casting obvious shadows in the foreground..

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When the sun is low, you get a green-blue  belt above the horizon, presumably the moon makes the same effect but much fainter, and perhaps that's what you picked up?

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5 hours ago, Stub Mandrel said:

When the sun is low, you get a green-blue  belt above the horizon, presumably the moon makes the same effect but much fainter, and perhaps that's what you picked up?

Sounds likely as the moon was directly behind me and very bright. Thanks for your comment and explanation. I guess I will have to wait a little longer to see the Aurora from Suffolk. 

Best regards George

 

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