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Polar scope


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Been trying to get my head around this ,but going round in circles,searched on here ,but cant seem to get an answer!

Polar scope on an eq5....got as far as getting my latitude set up ,pointing north ,tested a dot at distance in the crosshairs of the polar scope doing the 180deg test,few adjustments made it spot on but now im puzzled!

1.Are all the skywatcher polar finders views of the crosshair and stars set the same in the actual housing of the finder? ive seen a few examples and mine seems to be different.Will doing the point polaris to the six oclock position ,its highest point for a given time and setting the date and time correct all this?

2.Transit time of polaris ,can find this easilly enough,but do we have to check it everytime we go out viewing?(if the transt time is 01.03.2010 and ive adjusted the dials,will this efffect me viewing 5 days before and five days after if i dont move the dials?)

3.Is there a different way of doing the above to get the same effect :)

4.Please excuse my utter bare bones knowedge of your hobby.

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This is all a matter of degree (oops - pun) - the position of the star Polaris changes from day to day in a natural progression but for visual use, 5 days either side is no problem but for imaging it is a real and present issue.

Once you have calibrated your Polarscope (this MUST be done) and you seem to have done that, then you could use the program 'PolarFinder' to tell you where Polaris is at any time on any day and you could then position your Polarscope by turning the RA axis until the view matches that shown in the software and adjust the altitude and azimuth controls until Polaris is in the little circle in the Polarscope - you are now reasonably polar aligned for visual purposes.

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you could then position your Polarscope by turning the RA axis until the view matches that shown in the software and adjust the altitude and azimuth controls until Polaris is in the little circle in the Polarscope

Ive seen one example that tells you to position your polar scope visuals to what your viewing ,if the big dippers to the left of polaris rotate your RA to match, then align polaris into the little cirlce.So when the RA is in its resting position ,polaris will be out of the little circle? Is this right?

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Assuming that your polarscope reticule has The Plough (Big Dipper) and Cassiopeia etched into it as many do then yes, you can use this method although again it is only suitable for visual use.

When the RA axis is in its resting position, in all likelihood, Polaris will not be in the little circle although once every 24 hours (give or take about 4 minutes or so) Polaris will be in the little circle by happenstance!

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It will indeedy! I have the same mount and am also a newbie but the polarfinder prog is a lifesaver, I use mine on the patio so I initially eyeballed the mount in with polaris and the N leg on the mount. Then using polarfinder I printed off the sheet and then adjusted till i got what polarfinder showed me, now have 3 chalk marks on the patio, one for each tripod leg and i know I'm 'in'. Tracks great.

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Im a bit confused here Tophouse!(which isnt hard to achieve)

If i just copy whats next to polaris in the night sky and move the RA axis to match in the rectile,then position polaris in the little outer circle why do i need to use polar finder?

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Polar finder gives you a clock position (as does a Synscan hand controller if you have GoTo). The clock position would be for instance 8 o clock in which case the Poloaris circle would be in the 8 o clock position on the reticule.

Generally I set my date/time circles once a month or so and then just use the setting circles on the polarscope to get date and time. Its not very hard to do really. Once they are set for the month just spin the RA axis until the date on the date crcle matches the time on the RA circle and away you go. Its plenty accirate enough for visual.

Alternately you can use the hour angle method IF you have GoTo. Which can be quicker depending on the reliability of your RA setting circle. Mine tends to stick as do quite a few HEQ5s.

POlar finder just gives you the clock position of Polaris but you can equally well take a look at the Big Dipper and Casseopia and check their position reletaive to the view in the polarscope if you prefer.

I just find using the date/time circles is pretty fast and a bit more accurate.

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